2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC vs 2020 Toyota Sienna

2020 Toyota Sienna
2020 Toyota Sienna
$29,715MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC
2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC
$43,200MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2020 Toyota Sienna
$29,715MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC
$43,200MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now

CarGurus highlights

Winning Vehicle Image

According to CarGurus experts, the overall rating for the 2020 Toyota Sienna is 7.8 out of 10, while the 2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC scores 8.0 out of 10. Based on these ratings, the 2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC is the recommended choice for its superior design, technology, and performance.

Overview

MSRP

$29,715

MSRP

$43,200

Average price

$31,922

Average price

$34,511

Listings

403

Listings

1259
Ratings & Reviews
User Reviews
User Reviews

Expert reviews

7.8 out of 10

Expert reviews

8.0 out of 10
Pros
  • Great handling
  • Plenty of cargo space
  • Standard advanced safety features
Cons
  • Poor ergonomic design
  • Twitchy steering
Pros
  • Multiple powertrain options
  • Premium interior materials
  • Impressive technology
Cons
  • Uninspired styling
  • Underwhelming base engine
  • Advanced safety features are not standard

2020 Toyota Sienna Reviews Summary

Since the second half of the 20th century, each decade has had a hot-topic family car, and, as we’ve noted in a number of reviews this year, the crossover is our current darling vehicle. Before the crossover, there were big, truck-based SUVs. Before that, there were station wagons.

And for the past 35 years, there's always been the minivan.

The Dodge Caravan has been widely considered the Patient Zero of the minivan segment. From there, seemingly everyone joined the party, including Toyota, Nissan, Ford, Chevy, GMC, Volkswagen, Oldsmobile, Ford, and more. Heck, even Mercury had a “Nautica Edition” version of the Villager.

The minivan was king once, the crossover is king now, and some other type of vehicle will likely dominate in the near future. But in all this, the 7- and 8-passenger minivans will always represent the ultimate in versatility. The crossover is an image-forward fad with a dash of usability, but the minivan continues to prove itself as the pinnacle of practicality.

The 2020 Toyota Sienna is neither the newest nor flashiest minivan out there, but when you absolutely need space for people and gear, there’s nothing better. Additionally, the Sienna is the only minivan to offer all-wheel drive (AWD), which is something specifically desired by many car buyers.

2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC Reviews Summary

The modern compact luxury SUV market is an embarrassment of riches. Shoppers have more options than ever before, and all of them are terrific vehicles. There’s the BMW X3, Audi Q5, Volvo XC60, Acura RDX, Alfa Romeo Stelvio, and even the newcomer Lincoln Corsair. Not to be left out of this dizzying list is one of the segment’s most popular options, the 2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC.

While the X3 arguably kicked off the small luxury SUV craze, the bar was raised with the GLC’s predecessor, the GLK. But even the GLK felt like a stopgap compared to a fully realized vehicle like the GLC. It encapsulates everything that buyers are looking for in a compact luxury SUV—an upscale cabin, cutting-edge infotainment and safety technology, and driving dynamics that are equal parts athletic and comfortable. Many vehicles in the aforementioned list have some or all of these things, but few combine them all as elegantly as the GLC. Mercedes-Benz happily boasts the GLC is its best-seller, and with good reason. But should you count yourself among one of their customers? Read on to find out.

Popular Features & Specs

Engine

3.5L 296 hp V6

Engine

2.0L 255 hp I4

Drive Train

FWD

Drive Train

RWD

Seating Capacity

2

Seating Capacity

5

Horsepower

296 hp @ 6200 rpm

Horsepower

255 hp @ 5800 rpm

MPG City

19

MPG City

22

MPG Highway

26

MPG Highway

29
2020 Toyota Sienna
2020 Toyota Sienna
$29,715MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC
2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC
$43,200MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2020 Toyota Sienna
$29,715MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC
$43,200MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now

CarGurus highlights

Winning Vehicle Image

According to CarGurus experts, the overall rating for the 2020 Toyota Sienna is 7.8 out of 10, while the 2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC scores 8.0 out of 10. Based on these ratings, the 2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC is the recommended choice for its superior design, technology, and performance.

Overview
MSRP
$29,715
$43,200
Average price
$31,922
$34,511
Listings
Ratings & Reviews
User reviews
4.9
4.6
Expert reviews

7.8 out of 10

Read full review

8.0 out of 10

Read full review
Pros & cons
Pros
  • Great handling
  • Plenty of cargo space
  • Standard advanced safety features
Cons
  • Poor ergonomic design
  • Twitchy steering
Pros
  • Multiple powertrain options
  • Premium interior materials
  • Impressive technology
Cons
  • Uninspired styling
  • Underwhelming base engine
  • Advanced safety features are not standard
Summary

Since the second half of the 20th century, each decade has had a hot-topic family car, and, as we’ve noted in a number of reviews this year, the crossover is our current darling vehicle. Before the crossover, there were big, truck-based SUVs. Before that, there were station wagons.

And for the past 35 years, there's always been the minivan.

The Dodge Caravan has been widely considered the Patient Zero of the minivan segment. From there, seemingly everyone joined the party, including Toyota, Nissan, Ford, Chevy, GMC, Volkswagen, Oldsmobile, Ford, and more. Heck, even Mercury had a “Nautica Edition” version of the Villager.

The minivan was king once, the crossover is king now, and some other type of vehicle will likely dominate in the near future. But in all this, the 7- and 8-passenger minivans will always represent the ultimate in versatility. The crossover is an image-forward fad with a dash of usability, but the minivan continues to prove itself as the pinnacle of practicality.

The 2020 Toyota Sienna is neither the newest nor flashiest minivan out there, but when you absolutely need space for people and gear, there’s nothing better. Additionally, the Sienna is the only minivan to offer all-wheel drive (AWD), which is something specifically desired by many car buyers.

The modern compact luxury SUV market is an embarrassment of riches. Shoppers have more options than ever before, and all of them are terrific vehicles. There’s the BMW X3, Audi Q5, Volvo XC60, Acura RDX, Alfa Romeo Stelvio, and even the newcomer Lincoln Corsair. Not to be left out of this dizzying list is one of the segment’s most popular options, the 2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC.

While the X3 arguably kicked off the small luxury SUV craze, the bar was raised with the GLC’s predecessor, the GLK. But even the GLK felt like a stopgap compared to a fully realized vehicle like the GLC. It encapsulates everything that buyers are looking for in a compact luxury SUV—an upscale cabin, cutting-edge infotainment and safety technology, and driving dynamics that are equal parts athletic and comfortable. Many vehicles in the aforementioned list have some or all of these things, but few combine them all as elegantly as the GLC. Mercedes-Benz happily boasts the GLC is its best-seller, and with good reason. But should you count yourself among one of their customers? Read on to find out.

Video
Popular Features & Specs
Engine
3.5L 296 hp V6
2.0L 255 hp I4
Drive Train
FWD
RWD
Seating Capacity
2
5
Horsepower
296 hp @ 6200 rpm
255 hp @ 5800 rpm
MPG City
19
22
MPG Highway
26
29
Look and feel
2020 Toyota Sienna
6/10
2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC
10/10
The 2020 Toyota Sienna, in its third generation, had been around since the 2011 model year. Despite a 2018 update that introduced newer infotainment tech and minor changes, the 2020 version still felt dated. The front doors emitted a hollow "thud" when slammed, indicating a lack of attention to fit and finish. The instrument panel seemed to come from Toyota's 2010 parts bin, though its simplicity made the controls easy to use. The Sienna offered various trims, from the well-equipped base L to the luxurious Limited Premium, with features like a power rear liftgate, leather upholstery, and a JBL premium audio system. The Nightshade Edition added dark accents and wheels for those prioritizing a "cool" look. In contrast, the 2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC embraced a timeless aesthetic with soft curves and rounded edges, while still exuding modern aggression through its menacing LED headlights. The GLC's long hood and wide grille gave it a dramatic stance, reminiscent of a raised C-Class or E-Class sedan. Inside, the GLC's cabin was an automotive work of art, with flowing lines and a floating center touchscreen. Mercedes-Benz was moving towards larger screens and a minimalist approach, but the GLC's interior design set a high bar for compact luxury SUV cabins. The GLC was available in both conventional SUV and crossover "coupe" body styles, with the latter sacrificing some cargo space for a sharper look.
Performance
2020 Toyota Sienna
7/10
2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC
8/10
The 2020 Toyota Sienna came equipped with a 3.5-liter V6 engine producing 296 horsepower and 263 pound-feet of torque, paired with an 8-speed automatic transmission. The Sienna offered stout acceleration in normal Drive mode, with a Sport mode for livelier throttle and shift response. It also had a manual mode, which was seldom used but could be helpful for its 3,500-pound towing capacity. The Sienna's power was routed to the front wheels, with an optional AWD available for all trims except the base L. The FWD Sienna returned 19 mpg city, 26 highway, and 21 combined, while AWD versions returned 18/24/20. The Sienna handled surprisingly well for a minivan, with a low center of gravity and broad base, though its twitchy steering required constant attention at higher speeds. The 2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC 300 featured a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine making 255 horsepower and 273 pound-feet of torque, mated to a nine-speed automatic transmission. Power was routed to the rear wheels or available 4MATIC AWD. The GLC came with steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters and Dynamic Select with Eco, Comfort, Sport, and Sport+ drive modes. Even in Comfort mode, the turbocharged engine provided ample power, with precise turn-in and confident high-speed turns. For those seeking more power, the AMG GLA 45 offered a twin-turbocharged V6 with 385 horsepower, while the AMG GLA 63 featured a twin-turbo V8 with up to 503 horsepower.
Form and function
2020 Toyota Sienna
9/10
2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC
7/10
The 2020 Toyota Sienna excelled in cargo space, offering 150 cubic feet with the second-row seats removed. This was more than competitors like the Chrysler Pacifica, Honda Odyssey, Dodge Caravan, and Kia Sedona. However, accessing this space required removing the second-row seats, which was easier with captain’s chairs than a bench seat. The third row folded seamlessly into the floor, but getting into the backseat could be challenging. Toyota also offered mobility access features, such as the Auto Access Seat, making the Sienna a practical choice for those needing mobility conversions. The 2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC 300 provided 56.5 cubic feet of cargo space with the rear seats folded, and 19.4 cubic feet with the seats up. The GLC Coupe's fastback profile reduced these figures to 49.4 and 17.6 cubic feet, respectively. The GLC's cargo space was mid-pack for compact luxury SUVs, with the BMW X3 offering more. The GLC had a decently sized center console, deep door pockets, and retractable cupholders, making good use of its interior space. Rear-seat space was adequate, with plenty of legroom and headroom in the SUV, though the Coupe's low roofline cut into headroom.
Technology
2020 Toyota Sienna
9/10
2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC
8/10
The 2020 Toyota Sienna's base L trim came with a 7-inch touchscreen infotainment system supporting Amazon Alexa and Apple CarPlay. Other standard tech features included Bluetooth connectivity, five USB ports, and a WiFi hotspot with a 6-month trial. Higher trims offered additional features like navigation and a JBL 10-speaker premium audio system. The Limited trim also included Driver Easy Speak, an intercom system that broadcasted the driver's voice to the rear speakers, making it easier to communicate with passengers in the back. The 2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC featured the Mercedes-Benz User Experience (MBUX) infotainment system, with a 10.25-inch center touchscreen, center console touch controller, and advanced voice-control system. The steering wheel had two touch-sensitive pads for customizing the digital instrument panel and navigating the main infotainment screen. The system included Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, though switching between the GLC's radio and smartphone music apps required navigating through menus. Despite a learning curve, the MBUX system was intuitive and seamless once acclimated.
Safety
2020 Toyota Sienna
9/10
2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC
8/10
The 2020 Toyota Sienna came standard with the Toyota Safety Sense (TSS-P) suite, including lane-departure warning, lane-keep assist, forward-collision warning with pedestrian detection, dynamic cruise control, and automatic high beams. Blind-spot monitoring was optional on lower trims and standard on XLE and Limited trims. The Sienna earned five stars in NHTSA crash testing and top scores from the IIHS, including a Superior rating for its standard driver-assistance features. The 2021 Mercedes-Benz GLC came with standard safety features like automatic emergency braking, forward collision warning, blind-spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic alert, front- and rear parking sensors, hands-free parking assist, and a driver drowsiness monitor. Optional features included a 360-degree parking camera, dynamic cruise control, automatic high beams, and lane departure warning. The parking and proximity sensors were overly sensitive, but could be deactivated if desired.
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By: CarGurus + AI

At CarGurus, our team of experienced automotive writers remain at the heart of our content operation, conducting hands-on car tests and writing insightful guides that are backed by years of industry experience. To complement this, we are harnessing AI to make our content offering more diverse and more helpful to shoppers than ever. To achieve this, our AI systems are based exclusively on CarGurus content, ratings and data, so that what we produce is both unique to CarGurus, and uniquely helpful to car shoppers.