2020 Land Rover Range Rover Sport vs 2021 Volvo XC90

2020 Land Rover Range Rover Sport
2020 Land Rover Range Rover Sport
$68,650MSRP
Overview
Overview
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2021 Volvo XC90
2021 Volvo XC90
$49,000MSRP
Overview
Overview
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2020 Land Rover Range Rover Sport
$68,650MSRP
Overview
Overview
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2021 Volvo XC90
$49,000MSRP
Overview
Overview
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CarGurus highlights

Winning Vehicle Image

According to CarGurus experts, the overall rating for the 2020 Land Rover Range Rover Sport is 6.7 out of 10, while the 2021 Volvo XC90 scores 7.7 out of 10. Based on these ratings, the 2021 Volvo XC90 is the better choice, offering a more user-friendly infotainment system, advanced safety features, and a refined interior.

Overview

MSRP

$68,650

MSRP

$49,000

Average price

$46,444

Average price

$39,723

Listings

483

Listings

1320
Ratings & Reviews
User Reviews
User Reviews

Expert reviews

6.7 out of 10

Expert reviews

7.7 out of 10
Pros
  • Stylish design
  • Premium interior materials
Cons
  • Not much cargo space
  • Unintuitive technology
  • Poor value for money
Pros
  • Stylish design
  • Premium interior materials
  • Great safety ratings
Cons
  • Cramped third row
  • Sluggish performance
  • No USB-C ports

2020 Land Rover Range Rover Sport Reviews Summary

When you think of a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), the image of a dorky little hatchback car probably pops into your mind. The new 2020 Land Rover Range Rover Sport PHEV, however, is an entirely different kind of electrified vehicle. Land Rover says it retains all of its traditional land-roving capabilities while delivering greater efficiency. Based on our week-long test in this SUV’s natural habitat (the swanky suburbs of a big city), it does get remarkably good fuel economy.

2021 Volvo XC90 Reviews Summary

Volvo may be known for sensible station wagons, but the XC90 SUV is the Swedish automaker’s de facto flagship. The current generation debuted design features, technology, and powertrains that have since found their way into most other Volvo models. Several years into the current-generation model’s lifecycle, the XC90 is no longer a trendsetter, but remains Volvo’s contender in the competitive midsize luxury SUV segment, with the automaker’s typical emphasis on safety features.

The current-generation XC90 launched for the 2016 model year, so most competitors—including the Audi Q7, Acura MDX, BMW X5, and Mercedes-Benz GLE-Class—have been updated or redesigned since then. The Cadillac XT6 and Lincoln Aviator didn’t even exist when this generation of XC90 launched.

A redesigned version is expected to arrive soon, so changes to the 2021 XC90 are minimal. All 2021 Volvo models are now limited to 112 mph for safety reasons and get Care Key, which lets owners limit the top speed before loaning the car out to a friend or family member. The XC90 also gets a handful of newly standard tech features, and some small cosmetic changes.

Volvo offers the XC90 in three trim levels—Momentum, R-Design, and Inscription—with three powertrain options: T5 and T6 gasoline engines, and the T8 plug-in hybrid. Our test car was a range-topping T8 Recharge Inscription, combining the top Inscription trim level with the plug-in hybrid powertrain, which has the highest output of the three.

No video found
Popular Features & Specs

Engine

3.0L 355 hp I6

Engine

2.0L 250 hp I4

Drive Train

AWD

Drive Train

FWD

Seating Capacity

7

Seating Capacity

7

Horsepower

355 hp @ 5500 rpm

Horsepower

250 hp @ 5500 rpm

EV Battery Capacity

0.2 kWh

EV Battery Capacity

MPG City

19

MPG City

21

MPG Highway

24

MPG Highway

30
2020 Land Rover Range Rover Sport
2020 Land Rover Range Rover Sport
$68,650MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2021 Volvo XC90
2021 Volvo XC90
$49,000MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2020 Land Rover Range Rover Sport
$68,650MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2021 Volvo XC90
$49,000MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now

CarGurus highlights

Winning Vehicle Image

According to CarGurus experts, the overall rating for the 2020 Land Rover Range Rover Sport is 6.7 out of 10, while the 2021 Volvo XC90 scores 7.7 out of 10. Based on these ratings, the 2021 Volvo XC90 is the better choice, offering a more user-friendly infotainment system, advanced safety features, and a refined interior.

Overview
MSRP
$68,650
$49,000
Average price
$46,444
$39,723
Listings
Ratings & Reviews
User reviews
4.6
4.7
Expert reviews

6.7 out of 10

Read full review

7.7 out of 10

Read full review
Pros & cons
Pros
  • Stylish design
  • Premium interior materials
Cons
  • Not much cargo space
  • Unintuitive technology
  • Poor value for money
Pros
  • Stylish design
  • Premium interior materials
  • Great safety ratings
Cons
  • Cramped third row
  • Sluggish performance
  • No USB-C ports
Summary
When you think of a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), the image of a dorky little hatchback car probably pops into your mind. The new 2020 Land Rover Range Rover Sport PHEV, however, is an entirely different kind of electrified vehicle. Land Rover says it retains all of its traditional land-roving capabilities while delivering greater efficiency. Based on our week-long test in this SUV’s natural habitat (the swanky suburbs of a big city), it does get remarkably good fuel economy.

Volvo may be known for sensible station wagons, but the XC90 SUV is the Swedish automaker’s de facto flagship. The current generation debuted design features, technology, and powertrains that have since found their way into most other Volvo models. Several years into the current-generation model’s lifecycle, the XC90 is no longer a trendsetter, but remains Volvo’s contender in the competitive midsize luxury SUV segment, with the automaker’s typical emphasis on safety features.

The current-generation XC90 launched for the 2016 model year, so most competitors—including the Audi Q7, Acura MDX, BMW X5, and Mercedes-Benz GLE-Class—have been updated or redesigned since then. The Cadillac XT6 and Lincoln Aviator didn’t even exist when this generation of XC90 launched.

A redesigned version is expected to arrive soon, so changes to the 2021 XC90 are minimal. All 2021 Volvo models are now limited to 112 mph for safety reasons and get Care Key, which lets owners limit the top speed before loaning the car out to a friend or family member. The XC90 also gets a handful of newly standard tech features, and some small cosmetic changes.

Volvo offers the XC90 in three trim levels—Momentum, R-Design, and Inscription—with three powertrain options: T5 and T6 gasoline engines, and the T8 plug-in hybrid. Our test car was a range-topping T8 Recharge Inscription, combining the top Inscription trim level with the plug-in hybrid powertrain, which has the highest output of the three.

Video
No video found
Popular Features & Specs
Engine
3.0L 355 hp I6
2.0L 250 hp I4
Drive Train
AWD
FWD
Seating Capacity
7
7
Horsepower
355 hp @ 5500 rpm
250 hp @ 5500 rpm
EV Battery Capacity
0.2 kWh
MPG City
19
21
MPG Highway
24
30
Look and feel
2020 Land Rover Range Rover Sport
10/10
2021 Volvo XC90
9/10
The 2020 Land Rover Range Rover Sport PHEV maintained a subtle exterior, with only a small “P400e” badge distinguishing it from other models. The charging port was cleverly integrated into the grille, preserving the SUV's sleek design. The test vehicle, priced at $93,200 with options, featured striking Firenze Red paint, a black roof, and 21-inch aluminum wheels, enhancing its already impressive appearance. Inside, the cabin was adorned with high-quality materials, reflecting the vehicle's premium price tag. In contrast, the 2021 Volvo XC90 successfully modernized Volvo's conservative design with softer lines, more chrome, and distinctive LED headlights. The Inscription trim level, tested with optional 21-inch alloy wheels, was the flashiest, while the R-Design and Momentum trims offered sportier and more basic looks, respectively. The XC90's interior embraced Swedish minimalism, featuring matte-finish wood trim and optional wool upholstery, creating a refined and understated cabin environment.
Performance
2020 Land Rover Range Rover Sport
5/10
2021 Volvo XC90
7/10
The 2020 Land Rover Range Rover Sport PHEV combined a turbocharged 2.0-liter 4-cylinder engine with a 141-hp electric motor, producing a total of 398 horsepower and 472 pound-feet of torque. Despite Land Rover's claim of a 31-mile all-electric range, the test vehicle struggled to maintain EV mode, averaging 28.4 miles on electric power and 41.9 mpg. The SUV's adaptive air suspension and various driving modes provided a comfortable and athletic driving experience, though the regenerative brakes were somewhat grabby. Off-road capabilities remained strong, with a permanent 4WD system and the ability to ford 33.4 inches of water. However, recharging the battery proved frustrating, often taking longer than the stated 14 hours. The 2021 Volvo XC90 offered three powertrains, all based on a 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine. The T5 produced 250 hp, the T6 316 hp, and the T8 plug-in hybrid 400 hp. The T8 struggled to accelerate on electric power alone, often requiring gasoline engine assistance. The XC90's ride quality was excellent, thanks to the optional air suspension, and the cabin remained quiet. The SUV's towing capacity was respectable at 5,000 pounds for most models, though the base FWD T5 was rated at 4,000 pounds.
Form and function
2020 Land Rover Range Rover Sport
6/10
2021 Volvo XC90
6/10
The 2020 Land Rover Range Rover Sport PHEV's cargo space was limited due to the battery placement, reducing the standard 27.5-cubic-foot space. The SUV comfortably seated five, with excellent front-seat comfort and a tall riding position for rear passengers. The optional refrigerated center console bin reduced practical storage, but the dual-glove-box design helped. Entry and exit could be challenging for shorter individuals without the optional side steps. The 2021 Volvo XC90 offered six or seven-seat configurations, with average headroom and legroom in all three rows. The third row was tight for adults, and the seats lacked support. The optional power moonroof and standard four-zone climate control enhanced the spacious feel. The Inscription trim featured 10-way power-adjustable heated and ventilated front seats with backrest massage, though the steering wheel was not power-adjustable. Cargo space was limited, with 11.2 cubic feet with all seats in place, 34.1 cubic feet with the rear seats folded, and 64.1 cubic feet with the second and third rows folded.
Technology
2020 Land Rover Range Rover Sport
6/10
2021 Volvo XC90
8/10
The 2020 Land Rover Range Rover Sport's InControl Touch Pro Duo infotainment system was complex and occasionally frustrating. Despite spending time setting up the system, the touchscreen's lack of haptic feedback and occasional unexpected behavior made it challenging to use. The SUV's technology could easily distract the driver, making it less suitable for technophobes. The 2021 Volvo XC90's Sensus infotainment system was user-friendly, featuring a 9-inch touchscreen, 12.3-inch digital instrument cluster, Apple CarPlay/Android Auto compatibility, Bluetooth, and a built-in WiFi hotspot. The portrait-oriented touchscreen was easy to use, though the text and typeface could be difficult to read while driving. The wireless charging pad was too small for most phones, and the second-row USB-C ports limited front-seat charging options.
Safety
2020 Land Rover Range Rover Sport
7/10
2021 Volvo XC90
9/10
The 2020 Land Rover Range Rover Sport came with numerous advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS), but the technology could distract the driver. The new steering-assist system and lane-keeping assist were too aggressive, leading to head-toss and discomfort. Crash-test ratings were unavailable, but the SUV's nearly 5,500-pound weight provided a sense of security. The 2021 Volvo XC90 received the highest “Top Safety Pick+” rating from the IIHS for non-hybrid models and a five-star overall safety rating from the NHTSA. Standard safety features included lane-keep assist, driver-attention monitor, traffic-sign recognition, blind-spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic alert, automatic emergency braking, and Volvo’s Pilot Assist driver aid. Pilot Assist was smooth and quick to react, though it struggled with highway curves.
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