Has anybody had problems with excessive oil consumption in the 2015 Subaru Forester?

Asked by Aug 05, 2014 at 09:19 PM about the 2015 Subaru Forester 2.5i

Question type: Maintenance & Repair

I would like to buy a 2015 Subaru Forester in the next few months, but I'm concerned about the excessive oil consumption I keep reading about in older models and I know a class action lawsuit was filed against the company due to this issue.  For those who have purchased a 2015 Forester, have you had an problems with excessive oil consumption?

348 Answers

31,215

It's a little bit early to say. The 2015 Just arrived. Keep checking.

10 out of 10 people think this is helpful.
5,695

Untill the motor is properly broken in (the piston rings fully seal) you will always have slightly more oil consumption than an engine that is broken in. Also because of Subaru engine layout being a Boxer engine, you will notice slightly higher oil consumption anyway because it is easier for it to get past the rings and not all of it will drain back into the pan as quickly as an inline or V engine either so if your not giving it a longer time to drain back into the pan after driving it will also look like there is less oil. I own 4 Subarus currently ranging from 120K-200K miles on any one of them and have found that I use about 1-1.5 quarts per oil change. I figure $5-7 worth of oil to top it up between changes is not too horrible a deal.

31 out of 31 people think this is helpful.

I bought my 2014 Forester in early May. I have had to add 4 quarts of oil and the car hasn't even had it's first oil change. It has 5700 miles. I should not have to add oil to a brand new car at all much less 4 quarts! Not happy with this car at all.

71 out of 71 people think this is helpful.

Correction, that should have read 2015 Forester, not 2014. I would not recommend buying one unless you're prepared to to add oil constantly.

61 out of 61 people think this is helpful.
570

I have a subaru 2014 Forester and I would not recommend a new purchase for anyone on these cars. I have owned over 6 older subaru including 2 justy's. And I bought the Forester brand new and found that at 32,000 miles I still am adding over 2 quarts of oil between oil changes. I asked the dealer at Arapahoe Subaru in Colorado about it, since they service it and told me that's normal. My older cars never used oil like this new car is.

52 out of 52 people think this is helpful.
31,215

Sounds like class action lawsuit time.

31 out of 31 people think this is helpful.
480

Purchased a new 2015 Forester in May 2014. The oil light went on at 1,500 miles. I was advised to add oil (2 quarts) and bring in for a checkup. It apparently checked out fine, then it happened again at 3,500 miles with same result. I just took in at 7,200 and they say everything is OK but I am deeply skeptical as it was down 2 quarts. I have been advised if any further issues to request a replacement car. Katharine

42 out of 42 people think this is helpful.
31,215

Katharine, it would be advisable to get the paper work prepared at your earliest convenience. If this is happening repeatedly in the past and they can't find the problem. Odds are it will happen again.

15 out of 15 people think this is helpful.
540

I also have a 2014 Forester, manual transmission. Constantly adding oil and Subaru refusing to do anothing about but drag me back and forth to oil consumption tests. Just used 12oz of oil in 1200 miles. Dealer finally agreed to look into it. Unsure what is next. Very dissatisfied.

32 out of 32 people think this is helpful.
500

I have problems with my 2015. Engine just cuts out. Back to the dealer it went. Oh, I forgot to say, I only have less than 600 miles on the thing. They are trying to say its the Mobil gas. I have used that on all my cars and go to the same station. They are keeping it to drive for a few days to see if it does it for them. I just don't get it, 30 thousand plus dolllars and the thing stinks!

18 out of 18 people think this is helpful.
31,215

Mobile/Exxon as a company had there fair share of problems BUT produce an excellent product. As for Subaru...... They're got a problem. A big problem.

26 out of 26 people think this is helpful.
500

They sure do Mark, and when I brought that up , they said you can't believe anything on the net, yet proceeds to tell me "Google Subaru, you will see its ranked one of the best cars",,guess that is okay to believe. So I go back to get the car and they were sticking to their guns in saying it is bad gas causing the problem, yet they failed to remove this fuel and told me to take it home and drain it out. Hmm..I thought that is why I took it to the service dept, so they could fix the problem?. I told the little manager that I wasn't happy and they were not doing their job. He said he would have the techs remove the gas and he would drive it to see if it would still be cutting out. I asked about giving me a new car(this one only had 600 miles) he wasn't having that, then I told him I wanted out of the lease, he said fine, pay off the lease amount. The little man is a real ass. I will speak with the leasing bank tomorrow. They are not known to allow lease transfers but I won't be stuck with this piece of crap. Never again will I ever deal with this dealership again. I went ther ebecause they had such high ratings..lol lol,,,, guess the little manager was right, "you can't believe what you read on the internet"

32 out of 32 people think this is helpful.
31,215

Hi Sara. I am retired and living over seas now but I was in the automotive industry for many years. I'll put this in plain English. The "service manager" is a pimp. The "technicians" are like lady's of the evening. All that interests them is money. They want to replace parts. Not fix something, replace it. For example. Instead of soldering a wire back to a fuel pump they will replace it. That's how they make money. The pimp, whoops, the service manager gets a piece of the action so you can see where his interest is. Now, Subaru is not acknowledging that there is a problem. (Yet) So forget about them helping you for the moment. There's no money in it for them. Here's what I suggest that you do. Document each and every problem you have. What. When. How. Keep it simple but accurate. And the response you get. Also check out the Lemon law in your state. In TAXACHUTTES where I used to live, the dealer had 3 shots and just so many days to fix it or it went into arbitration. The consumer always came out on top. By all means, talk to the bank. They will not let you out of the lease. And you only hurt yourself if you don't keep to the terms you signed and agreed to. The bank didn't make the car, Subaru did and that's where you must take the battle. You strike me as a smart person. Be polite and persistent. You are going to deal with lot of people trained to say "NO" in a lot of different ways. Don't take it personally. Start with the Lemon Law. Tell anyone who you deal with at Subaru that you are prepared to tell everyone and anyone who will listen, be it by word of mouth or social media, just how disappointed that you are with this Subaru. Keep me in the loop. I'm glad to help.

58 out of 58 people think this is helpful.
31,215

Let me clarify my statement. Not all service mangers are pimps and not all technicians are street walkers. But frankly, some are right there with used.car salesman, lawyers and politicians.

12 out of 12 people think this is helpful.
210

I have a 2015 forester that is burning oil. about 7000 miles. light on 3 times already. do not buy this car until the issue is resolved. I was told this a "breakin peroid" and can use 1Qt ever 1200 miles Sounds like BS. D. Hunter

21 out of 21 people think this is helpful.
100

Yes! I have a used Legacy 2013 (had 9500 miles when purchased in August 2014). Car salesman never told me about this problem and from what I have read recently it's been out there a while. Twice my oil level light has come on since having the car for what a little over 2 months?

10 out of 10 people think this is helpful.
170

Purchased a 2014 Subaru Forester because of "Subaru's good reputation" -- much to my surprise, my NEW car burns oil. I have to keep checking the oil because it needs to be added on a regular basis. at my first oil change the Subaru mechanic told me this just happens and I have to keep an eye on it, that sounds like garbage to me when talking about a new car. I'm angry I switched to Subaru, never again!

17 out of 17 people think this is helpful.
540

my 2014 Subaru forester had the engine block replaced due to excessive oil and now I run out every 1200 miles instead of every 3000 miles. Horrible result! Still fighting with Subaru.

15 out of 15 people think this is helpful.
130

same problem, dealer is did a slide of hand show to get me past the New York State 18,000 mile limit so I can not lemon law this thing in New York. send me story..... subaruscrew@gmail.com

13 out of 13 people think this is helpful.
240

I bought a 2015 Forester (manual) last August. After 9200 km, I got a low oil level light. Checked the oil and could not see oil level. Had the car towed to dealer who told me it ran out of oil, and that it is normal to consume up to 1 l per 2000 km. B.S. I wish I had known about this when I bought the car. The reviews I looked at made no mention of this.

24 out of 24 people think this is helpful.
280

To add to the chorus: I was lucky enough to have a very responsive dealership. They replaced the engine block in my 2014 manual Outback last month. Today, 2000 miles later, the low engine oil light came on again. I'm waiting to hear back from the dealer now. Can't imagine what they'll try next. In every other way, I really love my car, but this is a deal- breaker for me. My last car was a Honda CRV. I put 268,000 miles on it but I never had to add oil, ever.

17 out of 17 people think this is helpful.
80

2012 Forester, going to the dealer because I finally questioned why it is using so much oil? What I was told from the service person over the phone sounds like denial and was told it is the PVC valve. Really sad now with this car and don't want to dump it on someone else so I will have to deal with it. Feel sorry now that I blamed oil use on my wife as she has run cars out of oil before but never a new one? Must say that the oil light never went on even though it was down 2 liters at one point. Can't see me buying another Subaru unless this is resolved.

8 out of 8 people think this is helpful.
70

For what it is worth, I have a 2010 Forester and put in 1/2 quart oil every 2500 - 3000 miles. I thought this was alot!!! as my previous car was an Outback and did not need to add oil between oil changes.

7 out of 7 people think this is helpful.
280

Are those of you who are having these oil consumption issues driving manual or automatic transmission cars? The service dept at my dealer said that the problem is mostly with the manual transmissions, which is what I have. Just wondering if that's the case.......

11 out of 11 people think this is helpful.
540

I have a manual

6 out of 6 people think this is helpful.
480

I also have a manual transmission.

4 out of 4 people think this is helpful.
125

I have a 2001 Subaru OBW am ready to upgrade to the latest OBW. Guess I am going to wait or go for something else. Shame, the 2001 has NEVER used excessive oil.

2 out of 2 people think this is helpful.
90

I'm looking into buying one of these cars as well. I've done my research and it looks like this issue is only on the 2.5 liter engines, and not the 2.0 liter turbo charged engines. Can anyone on here who is having problems clarify if they are driving the 2.5 or 2.0xt? And also whether they are driving and Automatic(CVT) or Manual? Thanks!

9 out of 9 people think this is helpful.
130

Yesterday my wife picked up her 2015 outback, automatic, 4 cylinder. Not sure about liter size.It is provided for her by her company. It has about 200 miles on it. After she arrived home last night, i could see smoke in the headlights, and smell burning oil. After she left this morning there was a puddle of oil where she parked, about the size of my size 12 shoe, but rounder, and again the smell of burning oil inside the car and outside. I got on google right away last night, and started coming across all the oil related problems. There are posts about adding oil every 2-3 thousand miles and it almost sounds like it is normal, or not a big deal. My wife actually likes the car, and so do i, but there's no way we are going to be putting oil in it like that. That's just silly to expect people to be cool with that. I wont mention the brand of my 2002 that has never leaked a drop of oil. Or just about any car ive owned. She's taking it in today. I may update, or i may just forget about the whole thing. Hopefully the later

13 out of 13 people think this is helpful.
80

I just dumped my '14 Forester Limited. I noticed all these threads after checking my oil level. Of course the dealer explained the normalcy of the oil consumption but i'm just not having it. I've owned several cars in my lifetime and NOT ONE did i EVER have to add oil in between changes. That's even with some over 100k miles. This is just not acceptable on a new vehicle. I traded it since the value is still really high. Figured i'd get out while i can to avoid any headaches. First subaru = last subaru

8 out of 8 people think this is helpful.
120

We've had the short block replaced on our 2014 Forester twice (i.e., we're on engine #3 now). There were high oil consumption issues on the original engine (a quart per 1200 miles) and on the first replacement engine (a quart per 900 miles). At first, the local dealer advised us that the condition was normal, and would eventually go away. We began pressing the dealer harder and harder -- made them add the oil, diligently checked the level after they filled it to make sure it wasn't over -full, etc. The dealer gave us something of a hard time for short block replacement #1, but were much better about #2. So far we're at 2500 miles without adding oil. I agree with the previous poster -- after taking our last 4 Honda's to 150,000 miles with virtually no problems, the 2014 Forester has been a gigantic disappointment. It probably will be our last Subaru.

12 out of 12 people think this is helpful.
14,015

Seems like a lot of these posts are for 2013 models or newer and manual transmissions. I have a 2010 Outback 2.5 Limited with the CVT transmission. The car has almost 70,000 miles and I have not seen any evidence of oll consumption. I do recommend synthetic oil, it does not break down as easy as conventional oil and can withstand higher temperatures. Drive conservatively and avoid racing the engine if you can avoid it. The engine will last longer and keep your car maintained regularly. There's no reason why you can't go 200,000 miles or more with these cars. Good luck.

9 out of 9 people think this is helpful.
580

As a Canadian, I can't hop on board to the US class action. I have a 2014 Impreza that needed a litre and a half of oil in less than 5k kilometers, so I'd likely be adding a litre/quart three times per maintenance interval. I am making sure to document the mileage and the complaint in writing to both Subaru Canada and my dealer so that I have an established complaint once the damage starts to be evident. I think the best approach to encourage Subaru to acknowledge and deal with the oil consumption problem is to use the social network tools to make as many people aware of the flaw as possible and focus on both the reliability and environmental aspect of their demographic. Subaru's are pitched as the car for the outdoor lovers. Yet these cars are emitting up to 3 gallons of oil into the environment per year based on usage of 2000 km or 1,200 miles per month. The more potential customers in those demographics that are aware of the polution these cars are generating and the impact on the long term reliability of the vehicles....anyone still considering a Subaru might also consider a Hummer.

9 out of 9 people think this is helpful.
14,015

I am very sorry to hear that. From everything I've read online, which is not always 100 percent accurate, it looks like the change in engine design from the time tested EJ 2.5 to the FB 2.5 is part of the problem. They apparently made changes to the piston rings and diameter of the cylinders. I think that the head gasket issue is solved with the introduction of the multi layered gaskets first used on the 2010 models. Also, there was a service bulletin for oil burning on a number of model years 2011-2014 Subaru Forester 2.5 For some reason, this only affected the 2013 Subaru Outback 2.5, maybe the Outback has better quality control? Question, do you have the manual transmission? The problem for you is that these service bulletins only cover the 2012- 2013 Impreza not the 2014 model that you have, which is very unfortunate.

6 out of 6 people think this is helpful.
14,015

Take a look at this below, www.caranddriver.com/news/Subar u-fb-series-engine-subaru-flat-four- engines You can also search for this , Car and Driver + Subaru New FB series flat four This article explains in detail what was changed and how the new engine is quite different from the previous moter in service since 1989. This article was published in January 2011. Hope that helps.

14 out of 14 people think this is helpful.
14,015

This might help, Subaru will replace the piston rings on some 2011-2014 Outback, Forester, and XV Crosstrek crossovers, and Impreza and Legacy sedans, due to a problem with excessive oil consumption.On some of these vehicles, Subaru has found unanticipated wear of the oil control piston rings. In affected engines, oil consumption will be higher than normal and consistent, and the condition remains until repair is made. The fix Subaru has come up with a fix for this problem in the form of a change in the surface treatment of the oil control piston rings. On affected vehicles, Subaru will replace the piston rings at no charge under the provisions of the cars' warranty. On vehicles out of warranty, customers will have to pay for their vehicle's repairs—a major out-of-pocket expense, since the engine has to be disassembled, piston rings installed and the engine reassembled, plus any other parts that were damaged as a result of oil loss, gaskets and fluids.Owners should closely monitor their oil levels, and to report consistent drops in oil levels to their dealer, along with the relevant Subaru TSB number, depending on which vehicle they own: 2013 Legacy & Outback w/ 2.5 FB engine: # 02-143-13R. Title: "Engine - Excessive Oil Consumption, Piston Ring Wear"

30 out of 30 people think this is helpful.
130

As a shopper looking for a good quality used car, I was considering a Subaru due to what I thought was a stellar reputation of reliability. Well, I have changed my mind after reading about this issue. I thing I will stick with Honda, for now.

13 out of 13 people think this is helpful.
95

I wonder if 2.0 XT engines have same problems, I didn't find any complains so far.

9 out of 9 people think this is helpful.
200

I have a 2015 Foresterand after 1000 miles oil light came on. Brought it to dealer and they said they would start an oil consumption test wich meant ann oil change and bring it back after 1200 miles. Oil light came back on after 1200 miles. Brought it in today and they said they are going to replace the engine. I am totally disgusted that I have a brand new car with 2400 miles and they are replacing the engine. When a asked the service manager if this is a common problem he said it has happened in some vehicles. Never did they disclose to me what a serious problem this is. I don't know what to do.

16 out of 16 people think this is helpful.
14,015

Who knows how pervasive this problem is, but, consider yourself lucky that it happened so early and your getting a new engine out of this situation.

7 out of 7 people think this is helpful.
120

Oil consumption defect rate is around 5% as per Subaru franchise owner. 2015 models have not undergone redesign. The problem will persist. Class action suit has been filed in NJ. This class action is still open so others can join although this will take years. I would file a consumer complaint to your State attorney general. My 2014 continues to burn oil even though it passed the SOA test.

11 out of 11 people think this is helpful.
14,015

John, thank you for your answer. I've got a friend with a 2009 Forester and I purchased my 2010 Outback 2.5 based upon her recommendation of Subaru cars. I purchased my car in May 2014 from dealer as a CPO vehicle and purchased the extended warranty to 100,000 miles. The car was in impeccable condition, but, did have 66,000 miles on the odometer. I've used it for towing my tear drop trailer and have mostly used it on trips. I have not seen any evidence of oil consumption, however, I've only put 3,500 miles on the car. I've been checking the oil at each fill up and am running synthetic oil. So, maybe I'm just lucky with the 2010 Subaru Outback 2.5 with the CVT transmission? Any thoughts?

5 out of 5 people think this is helpful.
120

You may have a vehicle with the older boxer engine. Problem is evident in 2011-2015 from what I can tell

1 out of 1 people think this is helpful.
580

Does anyone know if the cars are burning oil versus leaking/oozing oil? I would assume that if the car was burning oil, it would not pass the emissions tests and that would be enough for a new car owner to argue the Subaru defense that the consumption rate is within the normal range. Just for my own knowledge, what is a normal consumption rate for oil? I've never had a car that needed topping up until the later years when the gaskets started leaking.

4 out of 4 people think this is helpful.
540

Cars do not leak, they just burn oil. Was wondering if Barney's 2015 model is a manual or automatic transmission?

1 out of 1 people think this is helpful.
200

Automatic transmission

4 out of 4 people think this is helpful.
40

Burning oil continiously will destroy your catalytic converter over time! The cost of that and installing is not covered anywhere! It will come out of your pocket. Leaking oil onto the floor could point to a headgasket failure. That has been a regular dfect of that engine design....

4 out of 4 people think this is helpful.
14,015

It's almost inconceivable to believe that changing from the old EJ engine that was a SOHC to a DOHC only produced an increase of three to five horsepower in years 2013 to 2015, yet it caused all of these apparent problems? Of course the old EJ engine had head gasket problems in the past, but, it's ironic that in the last couple of years before its retirement they finally got it right only to jump into this oil burning issue. My advice is to document and chart your oil consumption so you can make your case for getting the engine fixed under warranty.

2 out of 2 people think this is helpful.
80

2015 Subaru Outback Manual, burning oil. Jumping through the stupid Subaru hoops. Oil consumption tests, short block, piston rings, blah blah, fix the damn problem. Keep documenting. This is my 3rd and final Subaru, I will not buy another one.

8 out of 8 people think this is helpful.
14,015

Hmm, let me get this straight, your 2015 Subaru Outback is burning how much oil in how many miles? I imagine it's under warranty? I would be in the service manager's office and on the phone with Subaru of America in Indiana. Try calling them. I had some routine questions that had nothing to do with this and they answered all my questions.

1 out of 1 people think this is helpful.
14,015

Here's something interesting about I found on the Internet... SOHC's rev higher and have more torque (on average) than DOHC's... and have fewer moving parts that result in less maintenance, less oil weardown, and fewer troubles on down the line. But it's good for smaller engines because they can pack in more fuel-efficiency boosting valves. Remember, Subaru changed their engine design to DOHC's in 2013, could this answer this question of increased oil use? Any validity to this statement? Both dual and single OHC Subaru's have 16 valves per cylinder, so, the principle difference between the two is the single vs. double camshafts.

5 out of 5 people think this is helpful.
14,015

Here's a little more detail on this subject of DHOC vs. SOHC engines, As I stated before, the DHOC engine design in the FB series just complicated the former EJ series engine. See web link below for explanation, both engines have 16 valves, but, the engineering is different. http://paultan.org/2005/06/22/sohc-vs-dohc-valvetrains/

5 out of 5 people think this is helpful.
14,015

Here's the most salient point of this article by Paul Tan, link is in prior post, "DOHC refers to Double Overhead Camshaft. This arrangement uses two camshafts in each cylinder head. Two cams per cylinder head means that a DOHC V engine has 4 camshafts because it has 2 banks of cylinder heads. This allows the manufacturer to easily implement a 4 valve per cylinder setup. Most of the time it also allows the engine to rev higher. It also allows better placement of the valves in an optimized setup that gives you maximum performance. But the disadvantage of such a setup is more weight, more cost and more complexity. It takes more stuff to drive two camshafts. The main reason to use DOHC is to drive more valves per cylinder. If a SOHC setup can allow 4 valves per cylinder, having a DOHC engine will not bring that much benefits over SOHC and the additional weight becomes a burden instead."

2 out of 2 people think this is helpful.
260

Do not buy any Subaru's until the oil consumption problems and/or class action lawsuits are settled.

12 out of 12 people think this is helpful.
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Dave, I wonder if this is just an anomaly with a percentage of cars sold as Subaru is on the rise and more cars are produced now than in past years. If this problem were this pervasive, it would affect every person and I'm sure that there would be a louder outcry everywhere. I'm not going to dismiss the importance of this issue, rather, encourage more people to come forward to force a resolution if this is necessary. I'm really glad that I have a 2010 model and have not seen any evidence of oil burning with the old EJ engine design, but, I'm going to keep a watchful eye on my car. I was initially concerned about the head gaskets issue, but, after I called Subaru corporate I discovered that my model year was the first year they used the multi layered head gaskets on the engine, so, I'm hoping that this will be a successful run to at least 125,000 miles or more? You probably saw my earlier post about the increase from 170 horsepower to 173 and then 175....too bad they made a number of engine modifications to just gain this modest increase. I am very pleased with the CVT transmission, it really does a great job getting the most out of the 2.5 engine and deliver very respectable fuel economy for a vehicle of this size. Even if I might have considered the Six for greater acceleration, I still would have chosen the CVT over the conventional 5 speed on that model year. The CVT just gets better mileage and always keeps the engine in the optimum range for power. It's interesting that Subaru only offers the CVT transmission now, which tells me that it has proven itself to be a success. I think the next 12 months will tell how well Subaru handles all of this controversy and be reflected in sales.

3 out of 3 people think this is helpful.
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Just found this on a website, see below What is Subaru’s response? Subaru has not responded publicly to the oil consumption lawsuit, and in response to the report, Subaru Director of Corporate Communications Michael McHale, declined to comment on the lawsuit. But he did say in the Courier-Post report, "However, I would say that the vast majority of our vehicles consume oil at typical levels." What should Subaru owners do? If you own a 2011-14 Forester, 2013 Legacy and 2013 Outback, with 2.5- liter engines, and 2012-13 Impreza and 2013 Crosstrek with 2-liter engines and you are having this oil consumption issue, take you vehicle in to your Subaru dealer and ask for an "oil consumption test." But keep in mind, it’s been reported that Subaru dealers are telling owners that the oil consumption issue is “normal” and that normal usage is 1 quart every 1200 miles. - See more at: http://www.torquenews.com/1084/2nd-new-oil- consumption-lawsuit-suddenly-filed-against- subaru#sthash.JzXetYKM.dpuf

7 out of 7 people think this is helpful.
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Found these two posts on an independent Subaru post about the oil burning problems, these were written by others, and partially explains the issue with the new FB vs the older EJ series engine, technical, but interesting, You just verified everything I just posted. But perhaps you overlooked the current oil consumption complaint. It has nothing to do with the HG's. That oil is being lost through piston rings that do not seat correctly, which SOA attributes to the hardening agents used on the FB engines. Many of these engines experience this problem from day 1. Intentional dealer overfill is documented on this forum, something you should already know. These engines have not exhibited oil loss through the HG's. That's the older EJ design. The lawsuit is about consumption on the FB, which not long ago SOA announced that the loss of 1qt of oil in 1200 miles is "normal", which you should also know. Revisions to the valvetrain include the use of roller rocker arms instead of lifters to actuate valves. These components and their layout contribute to reducing the width of the cylinder heads and overall engine width. The fuel injectors were moved to the cylinder heads. In the EJ engine, they were mounted in the intake manifolds. The relocation enhances the flow of atomized fuel, helping to improve fuel efficiency and reduce exhaust gas emissions."

2 out of 2 people think this is helpful.
40

I've had my 2014 Forester for 13 months and 34,000 miles...3 times so far between oil changes I have had to add a quart of oil because the oil light coming on...the first time was at about 4000 miles, then 3000 miles, now 1500. The Subaru keeps giving the party line, it's normal...I'm beginning to think they work for Obamacare and they keeps saying don't worry, be happy, everything is fine, have a free cup of kool-aid...I mean coffee. My 2005 Outback that I traded in had 165,000 miles on it and I never had this problem. The major problem is going to be when my warrenty runs out in 2000 miles...

4 out of 4 people think this is helpful.
14,015

Phil, 34,000, that's a lot of miles in 13 months! Are those mostly highway miles? Was your 2005 a Four or Six and was it mostly trouble free with respect to oil, transmission, head gaskets and engine? I'm sure you had to replace the timing belt if you had the Four, which is normal. If your experience was favorable, it would be a good predictor for my 2010 Subaru Outback 2.5.

1 out of 1 people think this is helpful.
14,015

Take a look at this web site, you need to take action before 50,000 miles. http://oppositelock.jalopnik.com/subaru-tsb-for-excessive-oil- consumption-1600566355 It is on a case by case basis, but, starting earlier is better. Documentation and persistence is key. From what I've read, we're talking about a small percentage of affected cars so it's not all Subaru's. Yeah, things happen and if there's a problem with your particular car, get them to fix it! Subaru has enjoyed a sterling reputation as a fine car company, remind them to do the right thing. Word of mouth advertising is always the best and I'm sure they don't want to lose that.

4 out of 4 people think this is helpful.

Class Action Law suit. Contact the attorney listed there and join the suit. http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/2014/07/18/subaru-oil-burner-lawsuit/12859865/

4 out of 4 people think this is helpful.
260

There are 2 class action lawsuits now. Subaru says that 1 quart per 1000 is normal which is total nonsense. Do not buy anything from them.

6 out of 6 people think this is helpful.

I have applied to the one I listed the link for. Where is the other and should I look into joining that one as well? I have never joined a class action before. This is my first and last Subaru! Bob

1 out of 1 people think this is helpful.
125

As someone who had a Subaru Outback Wagon for 14 years that has NEVER used oil over that period, I find your comment rather curious. One quart, 1/4 gallon very 1000 miles is just unacceptable. Your F150 at 1 Qt every 5000 miles would not show up on a vehicle that has an oil change every 3000 miles. To have to "top" up your oil twice before coming in for your regular oil change is ridiculous.

3 out of 3 people think this is helpful.
260

Here is Bob's answer, http://www.torquenews.com/1084/2nd-new-oil-consumption-lawsuit-suddenly-filed-against-subaru 1 quart per 1000 is crazy for ANY vehicle and unacceptable. Hence the lawsuits and other problems with Subaru's.

5 out of 5 people think this is helpful.
20

New oil change intervals are more than 3000 miles.on my F150 and my 2014 Focus, t he interval is 7500 miles for oil changes. Subaru, Ford, Hyundai, Kia, GM and Dodge recommend 7500 miles on an oil change due to the use of synthetic ot synthetic blend oils.

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Thanks Dave! I think it's time to trade in this POS. It is really a shame. I love every other detail of the Forrester. This oil consumption problem is just too significant for me to tolerate. The potential for larger problems down the road is too great. It is time to dump it before it goes down in flames. I don't know what that will do to my chances of regaining lost value from a class action suit, but I learned a long time ago that the only people that benefit from legal action are the attorneys. Time to ditch the bitch! Bob

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I agree, I don't think it''s worth the grief. You won't get what expect out of a class action suit anyway. CAS's are punishment and bad press only. Unless someone dies then it's a whole nother thing.

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The problem is the 0w20 oil. That is WAY TOO LIGHT!!!

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Thats really good news. I'm glad Subaru fixed it. However there are lots of really bad problems not being fixed.

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We have had a very sad time with Subaru lately. My wife bought a 1998 Forester, new. She loved it. It had the head gasket problem - that was fixed - and other than that it was a wonderful, reliable vehicle. NO oil burning issues. In 2011 she traded it in (at 171,000 miles) for a Forester 2.5i premium w/ manual transmission. At about 8500 miles, the engine started getting noisy and was diagnosed as having the "sewing machine" noise problem, which required the replacement of one of the head and valve train assemblies. Doing so required removal of the engine. There are several technical service bulletins (TSB's) regarding this issue. We were told it was a temporary quality control issue, but the bulletin has ben continued for '12, '13, and '14 models! So, a four year quality control issue? The new head and valve train assembly fixed the noise but then we spent months battling Subaru over the fact that the car had acquired a horrible idle (post the noise fix). The service manager kept blaming the gas we were using. After using their recommended fuel for about 6 weeks, with no idle improvement, they finally gave in and got serious about fixing the idle problem. They had to pull the engine out (again) and informed us that the valves were not adjusted properly. After a week in the shop we got the car back with no noise and an OK idle, but now it LEAKED oil badly. My wife had had it - she wrote a fiery letter directly to the CEO of Subaru. Long story short, we got a huge discount on a '13 with more equipment than the '11 with 0% for 60 months. We were rid of the "11. Happy ending you say? No. The '13 was fine for a while but lately (with 19,000 miles on it) it is doing the oil burning thing. About a quart per 1000 miles. We are really ticked about the whole situation. Subaru, of course wants us to do the oil consumption tests, which means a round trip of about 40 miles to the nearest Subaru dealer. I do not think Subaru has the problem fixed yet since people are posting about having troubles with their '15's. As for 0-20 oil being too thin, I have a 2010 Honda CRV that runs 0-20. It uses about 1/2 quart per 5000 miles, which is the oil change interval. As for the lawsuit, lawyers will get millions, and the Subaru owner - stuck with a problematic vehicle with a damaged resale - maybe gets a check for $1500, if that? We don't know what to do. We sure don't want to go through another engine-out-of-the-vehicle fiasco like we had with the '11. Some people who have had the short block changed are STILL having oil burning issues. Subaru is not on top of this!

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Well, my 2010 Subaru Outback 2.5 Limited with the Four calls for 5-30 oil, runs great and have not experienced any oil burning. Smooth and powerful enough with the CVT transmission, I've been getting 22 mpg towing my teardrop and fully loaded on the highway and 29 mpg normal highway driving. I'm using synthetic oil, even though it's not required, better protection against breakdown. I noticed that the introduction of the newer engines and thinner cylinder walls calls for 0-20 viscosity? So, all of these apparent problems are with the 2011-2015 models, how unfortunate. Plus, there seems to be more people having problems with the engines coupled to the manual transmissions. Wonder if this is linked to the nature of how people shift through the gears with the engine rpm's going up and down. The CVT transmission keeps the engine at a more even keel on normal acceleration and only increases sharply when you have to step out briskly. By the way, the CVT transmission seems to always keep it in the most optimal range for power and acceleration. Yes, it's a little different getting used to, but, I like it.

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I have a 2011 Subaru Forester and have recently been told that it will require a new engine at 75,000 miles to the tune of $5,500. I was then asked if we had done regular oil maintenance. I said yes, and that we have had to add between 3 and 5 quarts of oil between changes, the service center (at Subaru) acted surprised. After seeing all that is out there about oil consumption issues and such, I cannot imagine purchasing another Subaru.

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Yes, unfortunately, the "new and improved"????? FB Engine for the Forrester was introduced for the first year in 2011. And, it was not lucky for you, see this web site below. Subaru should really stand up and fix. http://www.caranddriver.com/news/subaru-fb-series-engine-subaru-flat- four-engines

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A lot of noise was made about the introduction of the FB engine featuring a timing chain vs. a timing belt. Turns out, that I'd rather deal with the timing belt issue than have a car that burns excessive oil. So, I'm glad in retrospect that I purchased the 2010. When I went looking for a CPO car, I actually considered a 2013 model year, and I'm glad I skipped it. Sorry to hear about all you guys out there dealing with this issue. The only thing I would strongly recommend is get that oil test done and hold your local dealerships feet to the fire. Remember, the squeaky wheel get the grease. They can only say no, but, you might as well try.

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Markw, I think you will do just fine with your 2010 Outback. My sister has a 2010 Outback with the same equipment as yours. They love it. No problems; they live on a 55 acre farm and even use it to pull a small trailer around the property to get hay to the horses, etc. Subaru introduced two "new and improved" engines for the 2011 model year, the "FB25", to go into the Forester and Outback, and the "FB20" to go into the Impreza and Crosstrek. The Forester got the FB25 in 2011 and the Outback got the FB25 in 2013. There was all sorts of hype and fanfare - better mileage, lighter weight, less maintenance "greener", blah,blah. Major changes were dropping the timing belt for a timing chain, more sophisticated valve train, movement of the oil filter from the bottom of the engine to the top, moving-parts weight reduction, AND going to 0-20 synthetic only oil from 5-30 whatever oil. Our 2013 Forester is using about a quart of $8 per quart oil about every 1000 miles, as I stated in a previous post. Buried deep down in the owners manual it states that the engine may use as much as 1 quart per 1200 miles, so by that definition, our Forester's engine is not OK, but almost OK (really??). We have actually thought about trading in the 2013 for a 2010 or older Forester or for a 2012 or older Outback just for the older motor design. I, as a consumer, have a lot of trouble with the idea that I'm supposed to be cool with the idea of basically paying for most of an oil change between oil changes. OMG, I had a 1966 Plymouth Fury in high school that had 77,000 miles on it and marginal valve guide seals. I got 2500 miles to a quart of oil on that! Hold on to your 2010 Outback, Markw!

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WillEF , thank you very much for your post, very appreciated! Good luck finding a late model 2010 with the old EJ engine design. Sometimes, "new" and "improved" has early start up problems, hopefully, this will get worked out, The old EJ design had a very long run and apparently they were able to make many improvements to that engine over a decade.

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WillEF wrote earlier that they were putting in an $8(eight dollar) quart of oil every 1,000 miles. Well, in case you have not realized this, that's $800 (eight hundred dollars) in the first 100,000 miles. So, if you thought you were saving money by not having to change your timing belt, your paying it another way and have the responsibility for watching your oil levels more closely than you might with an older EJ engine. I thought this was supposed to be lighter on maintenance? By the way, even though the timing chain is supposed to last the life of the engine, my question is whose "lifetime" are we talking about? With so many old Subaru cars in the "Subaru High Mileage Club" having over 300,000 miles, I'd rather have the belt change around 100,000 miles. At least I'll know that it's in good shape. If you have never had a timing chain failure, they can happen and any car over 150,000 miles is probably at risk. By the way, it's either 100,000 miles or seven years. Don't wait until the last minute or try to wring the last few days from a brittle timing belt, you'll regret it if it breaks. It's always best to keep one step ahead of these issues and keep your car on the road with full power. You'll get better performance and enjoy your car more in the long run.

UPDATE: Went to the dealer on Friday 2/20/15. They scheduled that day to start the oil use test. I waited until they were done with the oil change and then asked at the service desk what the "limit of acceptability is". They told me with a straight face that the car was fine if it came back in 1200 miles with less than 10.8 oz. of oil missing. With a standard oil change interval of 7500 miles I didn't need to do any pencil math to figure out I was not going to like the outcome of this test under any circumstances. I took the car to my local Nissan dealer and purchased a brand new loaded Rogue. I love this thing! Subaru has screwed themselves out much more than my future business. I am on several forums on the internet and one of them is multinational. I will be warning ALL of my friends about the dangers of doing business with Subaru. They would have had some significant costs to recall all the cars that were not performing but that would have been the right thing to do. All automotive manufacturers test designs thoroughly to prevent things like this. Any changes in the production methods, acceptance tolerances or materials must be accompanied by another thorough test. Someone at the factory was either fooled by a source into thinking things didn't change when they did or they just decided to accept a change without testing. The only other possibility is that they just thought sucking down two quarts between oil changes was acceptable from the start and I don't think anyone reading this thinks they would be so foolish. In any case. Subaru is no longer my problem. I would advise you all to dump your Subaru's as soon as possible. The word is not fully out yet and when it is the values will plummet. For the record I got $23,000 for my 2014 Forester 25i Touring in trade for the fully loaded Rogue and $5500. I am happy now and my wife says she likes the Rogue MUCH better in every way. The full 360 camera is amazing!!!!!! Best of luck my friends! Loyalty is a two way street. Dump them and warn your friends. Bob

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Nissan's are known for requiring more maintenance than other Asian cars. Did you consider a Toyota or Honda? I previously had a 1995 Honda Accord and kept that for 19 years.

Perhaps, but it uses 10W-30 oil and rides like it is floating on clouds. It is a great deal quieter inside as well. When you add to this the Bose audio that comes in it. WOW!!! When we purchased the Forester in April of 2013 the Honda was a close second. I thought I would just be going out to get one when this mess with Subaru came to a head. Upon actually driving both the CR-V and the Rogue it was no contest. The Rogue blows the Honda out of the water. I read a lot too. The Honda had similar oil consumption problems back in 2010. I don't know if they got it fixed completely or not but they are still using the 0W20 oil. I will mention again that the Nissan Rogue uses 10W30 and the EPA average/highway is 28/33. I will have to be convinced of the mileage just like I was a hard sell on the Forester. The Forester initially did 34 on the highway. I was delighted. Until it burn enough oil to mess up the oxygen sensors (maybe the catalytic converter too) and the best I could get when traded 24,400 miles later was about 30 on the highway. The negatives on the Rogue are yet to be seen. Way too new to know much about that. I will save all that for the Rogue forum. I am officially free of the Subaru and delighted with the change. I wish you all the best with the challenges before you. If you choose to fight, I hope you play dirty with Subaru because they did with you. I consider my actions a tactical retreat and in the nick of time. I will not have to go down with my Subaru. Bob

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Bob, good luck, I mean that, it's always better to be lucky than good! As far as my situation, I don't have any current Subaru Outback issues since my car is the 2010 Outback 2.5 Limited with the CVT and EJ series engine. My car uses 5-30 weight oil and I have not seen any evidence of oil burning problems. I've been following this forum to keep informed and have not heard from anyone on this issue with the 2010 model year. Only thing I've heard are good things. So, whenever you purchase a product or service, you're rolling the dice and hopefully you'll make the right choice. I'm not familiar with the Rogue, but, we've had experience with Altimas and whIle they are good cars, they did not perform like my 1995 Honda Accord. And, it's true over time that these things change. For a while, Honda Accord transmissions were horrible. Sometimes you win or lose.

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Bob, one more thing, this just in from Consumers Reports, Nissan, 59, 25%---the first number is what percentage of cars they tested in the Nissan line and the second number is the percentage of cars in the line they recommend. For your information, Subaru was 73, 80%. I hope your Rogue was one of the 25 percent that they rated well. By the way, as a matter of reference, not one Chrysler car got recommended, period.

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@Markw1952 Did the Consumers Reports mention anything about topping up oil on those recommended Subarus up to twice a month? This particular issue is not something that necessarily gets flagged except on the long term maintenance ratings which are often incomplete for new models or model years. I have no problem with the analysis of data. The problem is when Subaru hides data (they did from me) or if they are in denial about a problem. Bob can probably do the analysis himself too and having a major problem with the fundamental part of the car (the engine) may have overridden the more minor issues in Consumers Reports. For me, it's not that there's a problem, it's that Subaru is in denial, and therefore not willing to deal with it. This has substantial impact on the value of the vehicle whether you love Subaru or not. It may take years to bite you, and it may never bite you but smart money exits early.

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Hi Pablo of the North, I don't think Subaru is in denial of the oil usage, but I do think they are trying to walk around the problem with a multitude of desperate plans. It mentions in the owners manual for our 2013 Forester that a quart per 1200 miles could be considered "normal". And then there's all sorts of posts out there on various forums from people who had oil changed at a dealership and then shortly after checked the level to find the dealership had filled the engine 1/2 to 1 quart ABOVE the full mark. And what about the fact that this oil usage, apparently a pretty widespread problem, is dealt with only under a TSB - hear no evil, see no evil. So, Subaru, what about long term issues with this, such as destroyed catalytic convertors, O2 sensors that go haywire and mess with the mixture control, fouled plugs, etc.?? In a way, Subaru is dealing with it, but they sure aren't going out of their way to bring it up. P8C mentioned a number of posts back that Subaru was so "surprised" about their car using many quarts of oil between changes. Fake surprise in my view. I wonder if he's going to shell out the $5500?

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Hi WillEF, In Canada, there are no class actions against Subaru Canada, and I would argue that they are in denial. I could show you the letters from Subaru Canada and they are denials of a problem, of any problem. This is normal because we say it is. It is no different than if engines started failing and they told you to read some buried document which said it is normal for engines to fail after 10,000 miles. It is a cowardly response. If the salesman was describing the car, and he said "if your oil light comes on every two weeks, don't worry, just pull over and top up your oil, this is normal. Always keep a litre or two in your car" then perhaps I would not have reason to complain but of course I would not have purchased the car. This is not a small feature that the sales guys can choose to keep quiet like if the cup holders were inconvenient. This is a major problem with the engine of the car.

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Pablo - so, have you sold car? You wrote It is no different than if engines started failing and they told you to read some buried document which said it is normal for engines to fail after 10,000 mIles. REALLY? I doubt that this is true. And , just how many documented cases of excessive oil burning cars are out there? You really don't know, do you? As far as I'm concerned, it's probably a minority, otherwise this story would be on 60 Minutes! You make it sound like this is a ubiquitous problem and I don't believe that. Subaru has a long history of building quality cars and they started as an aircraft company. Those of you with compliants even in Canada can go talk with their dealership about a remedy, even without a lawsuit. After all, they want repeat clients. I hardly think that some bad examples will lower the value of all Subaru cars on the road. There's legions of people out there who are well served by their cars. Try and establish a rapport with your dealer rather than antagonize them. You can catch a lot more bees with honey than you can with vinegar. The "boxer engine " utilized by Subaru is unusual and only found elsewhere in Porsche, they'll work out the bugs in this new FB engine iteration eventually. Besides, your car if it's a 2015 is under warranty, isn't it? It's always desirable to check your oil at every fill up, remember when that was standard procedure at the gas station? Only takes less than three minutes to do that.

You don't seriously believe that anyone on this planet wood knowingly buy a new car if the salesman told them it might take a quart of oil every 2000 miles do you? You don't seriously believe it is ethical to bury this high oil consumption fact in the owners manual when 99.99 percent of car buyers never open it until they get the car home. Subaru is in denial. Please don't join them in it. Or worse yet, suggest anyone else join in the denial. If you have one of these oil guzzlers you know what you need to do to cut your losses. It is maddening that you have to even consider such a thing. It may also be financially impossible for you and that enrages me to think off their deceit. Bob

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I perused the 2010 Subaru Outback owners manual and compared that to the 2015 Subaru Outback version which states this message, ◆ Engine oil consumption Some engine oil will be consumed while driving. Under the following conditions, oil consumption can be increased and thus require refilling between maintenance intervals: ● When the engine is new and within the break-in period ● When the engine oil is of lower quality ● When the incorrect oil viscosity is used ● When engine braking is employed ● When the engine is operated at high engine speeds ● When the engine is operated under heavy loads ● When towing a trailer ● When the engine idles for long periods of time ● When the vehicle is operated in stop and go and/or heavy traffic situations ● When the vehicle is used under severe thermal conditions ● When the vehicle accelerates and decelerates frequently Under these or similar conditions, you should check your oil at least every 2nd fuel fill-up and change your engine oil more frequently. If your oil consumption rate is greater than 1 quart every 1,200 miles or 1 liter every 2,000 kilometers, contact your SUBARU dealer who may perform a test under controlled conditions. NOTE , they are not saying this is "normal", they're saying you should have your car checked out if this is happening. COMPARE AND CONTRAST this to the what it says in the 2010 Subaru Outback Owners Manual, ● When the engine low oil level warning light illuminates, have your vehicle inspected by your SUBARU dealer as soon as possible. ● The engine oil consumption rate is not stabilized, and therefore cannot be determined until the vehicle has traveled at least several thousand miles (kilometers). Even after break-in, when the vehicle is used under severe driving conditions such as those mentioned in the Warranty and Maintenance Booklet, engine oil is consumed or deteriorated more quickly than under normal driving conditions. If you drive your vehicle under these severe conditions, you should check the oil level at least at every second fuel fill-up time, and change the oil more frequently. Please refer to the Warranty and Maintenance Booklet for more details. ● If the oil consumption rate seems abnormally high after the break-in period, for example more than 1 quart per 1,200 miles or 1 liter per 2,000 kilometers, we recommend that you contact your SUBARU dealer. Plus, as I've said before there are some instances with a TSB where they have been replacing pistons and rings in affected engines. If you purchased a "new" car, and it's under warranty, by all means, go back the dealer and make them repair your car. Finally, I don't know how everyone treats their cars, but, we're pretty easy on our vehicles. I cannot imagine someone purchasing an Outback or Forester and driving it hard like a WRX STI. And, apparently it matters greatly how your car was driven during the break-in period. If you did not follow the instructions in the owner's manual, then, you've created the problem yourself. Of course, I imagine that not everyone takes the time to read the owner's manual all that carefully.

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@Markw1922 The example about if an engine failing was to demonstrate that just because Subaru says it is normal does not make it true. You obviously missed that argument. If we asked 100 intelligent humans whether they thought it was "normal" to expect to have to top up a modern car with half a litre of oil every two weeks (light goes on when half litre down, 1200 miles per month driving) how many do you think would say that yes, it is normal? How many would say they'd buy that new car? I expect 100 would say it is not normal, and nobody, except perhaps you, would buy that car. No, I don't know how many documented cases there are. This is because I have no access to the documented cases. This is something Subaru DOES have access to but they are not sharing it. This sort of groundswell does not start on it's own, it starts for a reason especially among customers with stronger than normal loyalty to Subaru. The other consequence of Subaru not addressing the issue is that the side effects and consequences of a problem which MAY exist are not researched and I don't have guidance to take preventative measures. These may come much later in the car's life after my warranty has expired. I know my oil light came on twice in the first couple of thousand miles. Not one person I talked to at work, not friends, not relatives said don't worry, it's normal. They all said "What??". Talk to my dealership? You don't think I did that already? Dealer did not even respond to my request for information. Then the alternate dealer I went to for first service, when I asked about the excessive oil consumption issue - "Hey Bill, does the 2014 have the oil issue...?. We can do an oil consumption test but anything less than 1 litre per 2000km is normal sir....contact subaru Canada if any concerns...." I don't mind Subaru "working out the bugs" on the new engine designs but do it on your own dime, not mine. Also, do it before you plunk the engine in a new car. And if you think this is normal, then you don't need to fix that bug, all is good, right? Just make it clear to the public that they should expect 1920's style checking of and topping up of oil. Just get your gas station attendant to do it each time he fills up your car and washes your windshield. I could see the Subaru commercial in my head. However, don't publish the commercial of my wife on the side of an icy highway at night, topping up her oil, flashlight in hand, kids crying in car seats. That might impact sales, despite being a "normal" experience for the new Environmental and Reliability conscious Subaru owner. But then again I don't have a Subaru tattoo on my butt so I'm not thinking clearly.

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OK Pablo, for clarification, I just called Subaru of America to get to the bottom of this issue and here's what I found out. What the owner's manual should have stated more specifically is "it's acceptable to use one third of a quart of oil every 1,200 miles or it's normal to use one quart every 3,600 miles. Any extra oil consumption above one quart every 3,600 miles means that you can ask for an oil consumption test. I'll admit that the owners manual language is a bit misleading which is why I called them on the phone. Exactly how many miles are on your car? And what model do you have?

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Well then even Subaru Canada is confused by the manual. Here is their direct response to me: "It is important to note that Subaru Canada's tolerance for oil consumption (as outlined in section 11, on page 9 of your Owner's Manual) is 1 liter of oil per 2,000 km driven. Regretfully, if your vehicle is within this tolerance and there are no other mechanical concerns present then there may not be a correction available to you at this time." They told me the oil light goes on when one half litre down which means every 1000 km (about 600 miles). This would happen twice per month (2000 km per month, 24,000 per year) for average mileage which is about what I do. Suggesting that you may expect the oil light to come on every two weeks or so is preposterous. Sure, I can top it up every weekend, or every fill up but I don't want to do this. I shouldn't have to do this. This is a major feature of a car that a salesman should be telling me about before they take my money. I've never had a car that requires top ups between maintenance dates unless there is a leak. I think most buyers that would have the oil light come and have to top up a half litre of oil 10 times in their first maintenance window might possibly agree with me that there's a problem. Mine is not that bad (yet), but the audacity of Subaru to deny this is abnormal or that I should be concerned??? Why would I even need an oil change because I've cycled a full oil fill in the maintenance period, like a constant flush of oil.

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Pablo, go ahead and call them at 800-782-2783 and verify what I just told you, I spoke to Lisa in customer care. What year and model Subaru do you have? I have never seen the oil light come on except when starting the car when all warning lights illuminate, this is normal on starting the engine. My car is a 2010 Subaru Outback 2.5 and I have 70,000 miles on my car. Since I've been aware of this oil burning issue, I check often, and have taken the car on two long trips, no oil burning whatsoever. Even though it's not required, I am using synthetic oil in my car and it calls for 5-30, which is different from newer models.

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Hey guys, On one occasion, I was down 1.25 quarts on our 2013 Forester and NEVER GOT AN OIL LIGHT. An additional note. If this is a problem with hardness coating on the oil wiper rings on the pistons (as Subaru claims), then they should know exactly what vehicles were affected (effected? - never could get that right) by VIN and engine serial number. If they can't track that sort of engineering and sourcing mishap, then I think Subaru needs to spend a whole lot more time taking care of design and a whole lot less time telling me how much dogs like to ride in their vehicles. This "just wait and see" if the customer happens to notice is a sucky business practice.

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WillEF, call Subaru of America and tell them your story. Plus this link http://www.thecarconnection.com/news/1092813_some-2011- 2014-subarus-to-get-new-piston-rings. You have to be the squeaky wheel in this case. They sell a lot of vehicles and if you and some other people think that this is affecting every car, well, I think you're mistaken, sorry. I agree with you, they should know the affected cars, but, then again, that's a lot of cars to track down, so, you have to be the "canary in the coal mine" on this issue. Good luck.

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Pablo, WillEF, see Betty's post above in Colorado in which Auto Nation replaced the engine in their 2013 Subaru Forester. They pursued a remedy and were successful, I'm sure you can do the same. This is direct evidence to me that Subaru is being responsible, unless you think they lied about their experience. Does it take a concerted effort, of course, everything does. Keep records of what you do and good luck.

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@WillEF I think we added just over 1 litre immediately after the first oil light warning but when I told the subaru dealer at the shop he told me that it must have only been half a litre because the light is designed to come on when it's down half a litre. This is an Impreza. I think there is quite a bit of variation. And @Mark, nobody is saying every Subaru has this problem but there appears to be some very specific changes they made that they acknowlege as a cause for increased oil consumtpion. Every car is different as is every driver and condition so there is variation in the amount cars consume. If this problem becomes common knowledge it will affect (verb form) the value of all Subarus because a buyer will never know the consumption until they have purchased. I tend to buy cars and drive them for 12+ years but others may wish to sell earlier and this affects their value.

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@Mark I agree that there are some signs of responsible handling of this by Subaru, but I'd prefer to go for a walk, and many other things for that matter, rather than chase around Subaru, write letters, log statistics about my car. I want a reliable car that just works. This was part of the justification for buying a Subaru in the first place. But so far, as you can see from the snippet of the letter back from Subaru, that they don't plan on helping me. Mine is not a serious problem yet (only two top ups in first maintenance window). I am more disappointed with Subaru's hiding behind their lawyers than I am with the technical glitch. But if they continue this response, I'll do extraordinary things to attach "this" to their brand. "This" is a car with poor reliability which spews up to 10 litres of oil into the environment per year and says that's okay. 60 minutes, here I come.

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Pablo, I normally keep my cars for 15 to 20 years, or 150,000 miles to get the most service value from the car, resale value is only important if you intend to sell the car. So, I'm glad to see above that you're now saying that this is not a problem on every Subaru sold, of course that's not true. I'm sorry you're experiences are a problem, but, if you're under 50,000 miles like the 2013 Forrester above, I think you and WillEF have a better than even chance of getting Subaru to help you. As far as resale values are concerned, Subaru cars have excellent resale value, just check out Kelley Blue Book. The new 2015 Legacy is rated very highly. Subaru has a vested interest in keeping their reputation, you know it and so do they. Forget dealing with an unreasonable dealership, go directly through Subaru of America, or find another dealer, if possible. Sure, there are going to be problem car samples, appeal to them to make you happy, positive word of mouth advertising is the best advertising in the world. If your Imprezza is on the list for the piston rings recall, call their attention to it. If that's too much for you, sell the car.

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Mark It's great that you took your happy pills and are content with the fairness of the world and Subaru. Here is what I expect from Subaru: 1. Acknowledge the problem (don't deny the problem) then qualify and quantify it. "The following engines were build using a different process, the engine bore changed, piston rings changed to try to improve mileage and here are some symptoms you may see and if you do we need to confirm... or whatever the problem is". This information is out there, but just not official. 2. Stop with the campaign "you should expect to top up your oil every two weeks". It is an insult to any owner except those taking Subaru happy pills. "Golleee, when I was a boy in the 1920s my dad checked the oil every day and had to wind up his car." 3. Directly contact customers that have cars with engines that were build using the flawed process, explain technical details or possible symptoms and long term consequences in a written letter, 4. Offer remediation for serious problems after a clear process for determination of the seriousness of the problem 5. Extend warranty coverage on engine and other parts that are undoubtedly going to have a shortened life (catalytic converter for example). I never said all Subarus have an oil consumption issue, but if and when the cause of the probem is identified, IT WILL AFFECT THE VALUE OF ALL CARS BUILT WITH FLAWED PROCESS, because anyone buying a used Subaru from those models and years might assume that the owner is lying about the problem like Subaru has done for the last 4 years. Most sellers won't say "I'm selling it because the engine is a ticking time bomb and I am sick of pouring oil into it". They might say "it's great, reliable, green" just like my lying car dealer did. So your argument is seriously flawed. If I keep the car for 300k kilometers, it will need an engine replacement and if I choose to sell it, it will be at a diminished value. You're right though, if Subaru can contain the truth about this, then our cars may maintain a high resale value. Subaru has wrongly assumed that the best way to maintain their reputation is to deny this problem and hope it goes away. And as I pointed out before, I already contacted my dealer and Subaru Canada. They have NO INTENTION of helping or even ackknowledging that a problem exists with some cars, or how to determine if mine is one of them. They were thoughtful enough and aware enough to put in an oil sensor that flashes earlier, at a half litre down instead of a full litre down. Hmmm, I wonder if they knew something about this? So if you want to keep cheerleading for Subaru, that's fine with me, I'll turn on the ignore filter. I'd be happy to see any technical data from Subaru that has substance if you and your good buddies at Subaru can spare it. Even a denial that says "we did not change the piston bore, and we are not currently trying to fix a problem with poor tolerances....anything other than "that's normal"

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Pablo, part of the reason I'm happy is that I don't have the new "FB" series engine, I have the tried and true EJ series engine, phase 2 with the corrected head gasket problem. It's better to be lucky than good in this case. Sorry. I agree with you and have agreed all along that Subaru should stand behind their products and fix this for the samples of cars with the oil burning issue. That's why I raised the issue of the service bulletin and posted this earlier on this forum. Go ahead and get the oil consumption test. You cannot just simply complain and do nothing about it. As I said before, and you acknowledge, this is not happening on all cars. Now. you seem like your very dissatisfied with your car and Subaru in general. Go ahead and sell your car. Didn't you say "smart money exit's early"? Yes, I've seen the posts on the Interest about the class action lawsuit, there are many stories on the Internet about all kinds of things and sometimes they sensationalize stories out of control. When I see this in a major newspaper, I'll consider it more seriously. Or, maybe you can get it on 60 Minutes.

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You should also be pleased that there is a warning light for low oil. Not all cars feature that; I didn't have that on my 1995 Honda Accord.

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Mark, you are all over the map on this. Good for you, you have a car that does not have a manufacturing defect. Me, I'm not sure yet. I'm taking actions to find that out. I do know that it's a pain in the ass to have a constant concern about the oil in the engine. Subaru is stonewalling me and everyone else trying to get to the bottom of this. Not happy about that. Not sure why your in this conversation about those of us affected. I would guess you're somehow employed by Subaru or have ingested some special coolaid. I really don't care what you think. I'm on a forum, gathing information that I can't get from Subaru because they are corporate cowards. I may choose to take a $5000 loss by selling before the first year is out to avoid a $10000 loss later on. Either way, I will use whatever tools I have to correct the perception of the Subaru brand that Subaru and guys like you are putting forth, that somehow they're a manufacturer concerned about reliability, the environment and their customers. If I wanted to make 80 year olds aware of this, I might take your advice and try to get a story on 60 minutes on old fashioned TV, broadcaste on what, Sunday night to old age homes across this nation...actually your nation because nobody here in Canada watches that sensationalistic crap. I prefer to converse using forums and/or social networks to facts. Occasionally people like you respond and try to obfuscate the issue with emotional statements of blind loyalty. I'm not even sure why I'm responding to you. This is my last response so go ahead one last time pledging your love for Subaru and crowing about your "lucky" genius because you got the 2.5 CVT blah blah blah.

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Why am I in this conversation? I heard that there was an oil consumption problem and wanted to be informed about all aspects so I could find out if my model would be affected. Just because I'm not doesn't mean I don't care about the issue in general. After all, I have a Subaru and don't want to see Subaru's reputation go down the drain. I think they should help people out who can demonstrate a problem with their particular cars. Not everyone will have this problem. Good luck.

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Plus, I've got a friend with a 2011 Forester.

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I have a 2014 crosstrek. So far no problems but I am worried. If it starts burning oil I'll try it Subaru's way for exactly 3 times, then it's off to the lawyer. Subaru's has not been known for playing games in past but they sure are now. Most of the big 3 are having problems and there is of course the air bag module that is bad on a whole bunch of cars. There are lots of lawsuits over that one and they promised to fix it but not so much yet.

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Correction, I've got a friend with a 2012 Subaru Forester, we saw them today. He has 40,000 miles on his car and it doesn't burn any oil.

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i have a 2015 subaru i bought in august and before the odometer hit 2000 miles, my oil light came on. then again at 3800. then again at 5000, now again at 6700. i started a "case" with subaru of america but they just basically blow alot hot air around under the guise of "normal" oil consumption for these advanced engines. bologna.

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That response is consistent with the one I got. Mark suggests to just ask for an oil consumption test, but can't seem to grasp that Subaru is maintaining that your consumption level is normal, since it is below the preposterous number they are quoting. You might want to try convincing the dealer, who stands to gain from a hefty warranty repair bill. If you get them on your side, they might go to bat for you with Subaru corporate. It seems that you have done so, but keep good records, and make sure you give Subaru a copy of those records promptly when you get the warnings, and keep track of exactly how much oil you put in, or if you take it to the dealer, have them document exactly how much they put in. Also, keep very accurate mileage records. You will find that the dealership numbers are way overstated in the first place but the important thing to show the reduction over time which is likely with an engine defect. The sorts of things they might say to clutter the facts: 1. it depends on driving and conditions (no way to quantify) 2. light came on prematurely, only needed a bit of oil 3. you may have underfilled after the warning - was the engine warm, level. If you need to sue in small claims court (easier than class action) the records will help. You can't sue until you can prove damages so that's going to come later on when the engine starts to falter. Or....as Mark suggests, you should call Subaru and thank them for providing such an advanced car that has an oil warning light. Is it or is it not working great? Why in 1926 when my father first rode is horse into New York, he had to stop every 20 minutes to get the horse a drink, and I won't even mention the clean-up...

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Lisa, how much oil did you have to add when the light came on each time. Subaru of America corporate says if your car is using more than one third of a quart every 1,200 miles than you can contact them for the oil consumption test. Follow up with them at 800-782-2783, I talked with a Lisa in Customer Care. If the local dealership is giving you no attention , escalate the issue to corporate. Hey, your under 12,000 miles, I would escalate the issue. I'm sure you carefully followed the break in period for your car, correct? From what I've read, some cars do use a little more oil while the engine seats, but , you should ask them what that mileage milestone is. Some cars are definitely defective and should be fixed under warranty. You will note in the thread above that a couple got a new engine in their Forester. It's true that my friend was lucky enough to get a 2012 Forester with no problems, so, it's not every car. In Betty ' s case above her 2013 Forester was using one quart every 1,500 miles. I'm going to state this one more time for Pablo, Subaru of America Corporate said that it's considered normal for these cars to use one quart of oil every 3,600 miles, not 1,200. These are "boxer engines " and flat Fours. They're a different designed engine and if you didn't want this feature you should have never purchased the car. Yes, I still think that the warning light is a very good and helpful feature. How long does it take to check your oil every other fill up? Less than 5 minutes.

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Let them know you are aware of several reports to Subaru on oil issues, and strongly suggest they do an oil consumption test, letting you know specifically each time how much oil they had to add. Follow this and other blogs for more ammunition each time.. It would not hurt that you speak with (loudly) with the sales person on the sales floor while others are purchasing.. About your discovery on thier new safe cars that so many of us are having oil issues with..

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And spread the word through social media. Get it to as many people as you can. Tweet it, post it, talk to friends and coworkers. I would like to warn as many potential customers as possible. My biggest weapon is the letters that came back from Subaru which state that up to 1 litre per 2000km (about a quart per 1200 miles) is normal. I pasted the exact text from the Subaru Canada agent up in an earlier post with quotes around it so even a simpleton with no math background could understand it. Apparently what's normal in US is different despite what Mark posted earlier right out of the users manual "● If the oil consumption rate seems abnormally high after the break-in period, for example more than 1 quart per 1,200 miles or 1 liter per 2,000 kilometers, we recommend that you contact your SUBARU dealer." He has since disputed his own quote so he is definitely correct about one or the other quotes he made. This one I pasted from his note agrees exactly with what I pasted from my letter from Subaru Canada. Nonetheless, the more people you convince NOT to buy a Subaru, the more likely it is they'll do something about it. At least you can save your friends.

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Pablo, just to be clear, what I stated, the one third quart in 1,200 miles or more than one full quart or more every 3,600 mile was a direct quote from Lisa at Subaru of America, Corporate. I invite you to call her to verify. Yes, I know there's confusion as to what is in the owners manual. That's why I called them.

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A few points I'd like to make. At least one person in these comments thinks I work for Subaru, I don't. I also don't have an oil burning problem that I'm aware of with my 2010 Subaru Outback 2.5 Limited. But, I'm interested in this issue because I own a Subaru. Subaru is a smaller scaled automaker than most other car companies, and usually sell all the vehicles they build, they have 7 different models compared to Toyota's 16 models so they can perfect what they do best with the cars they make. That doesn't mean that there won't be any problems. Since they started in the US, Subaru has been building and growing their operations and have enjoyed a steady climb in sales. They're expected to sell 500,000 cars this year in the USA alone. If every one of these cars had an oil burning issue, this would be on the national news, it would be everywhere. Of course there's an issue with some cars, but, you should also know that "boxer engines" are known to consume more oil because they are flat engines and sit low in the engine compartment and the oil pools in the engine. Flat engines have a lower center of gravity and better lateral acceleration around turns, plus Subaru has established one of the highest safety records in the industry. Their forward collision system Eyesight earned them honors with the IIHS. Now, most Subaru owners did a fair amount of research before purchasing a Subaru car and had specific reasons for doing so. If you did, you should have known some of these issues about Subaru posted on the Internet. OK, maybe they consume more oil, maybe you've just purchased the car and you're disappointed, make your case to get case heard and get your car fixed. I think that it's possible that the posts on this forum are a distinct minority of cases, sure, it's unfortunate. However, take solace in this fact, 95 percent of all Subaru cars are still on the road after 10 years or more. And, Subaru cars, particularly "boxer engines " are known for their long term durability, some have gone over 300,000 miles and even some to 500,000 miles. Don't believe me, just Google search the Subaru high mileage club. So, in closing, you can either wallow in despair about your oil burning issue or go through the steps to file a claim. Hey, Betty above got a new engine in her 2013 Forester. It can be done. If you are really that dissatisfied, sell your car and get a conventional inline engine. Good luck with your efforts. Subaru has a satisfaction level of 73 percent in most publications from 80 percent of their line of cars, there must be a reason for this. Ask yourself just how many Chrysler cars have been around for 20 years? The answer is none, by contrast, the Legacy has been around more than 20 years and was selected as one of the top mid sized cars this month for 2015. And, the Subaru Outback has been one of the top cars for more than 20 years. All cars have some problems, if you have owned a lot of cars, you should have figured that out by now. My best advice is choose the car that meets your needs in the price point you can afford. I think that you'll have to look very hard to find a better overall value for what you're going to find with a Subaru.

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My apologies, Mark. Who would have ever made the mistake of thinking you worked for Subaru? I carry around a Subaru commercial in my pocket too. Glad you cleared things up for all the misguided owners here who thought there was an issue.

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From everything I've read on this subject, it seems like the higher proportion of cars affected by this problem that are mostly manual transmission cars. Maybe it's just the anecdotal stories I've read, but, I do find this interesting.

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Problem with my automatic forrester

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Everything so far is anecdotal at this point because Subaru holds all the information and is sitting on it. This has been an issue since 2011 so you'd think a responsible company would collect the data, release the data, and release their research on the causes (piston rings, manual, CVT, cold climates, thin oil...whatever) so we wouldn't have to guess and start a grass roots movement to get the data. All I can say is I'm sure they've collected and analyzed the data so there must be a very good reason why they have not released it. And I agree with kmkm that suggesting it's normal? Anyone who suggests it's normal instantly has zero credibility. Until I see it on Subaru's commercials, that checking and topping up the oil each fillup is part of the Subaru experience, then it's not normal.

I sold my 2014 forester. When word gets around they won't be worth much. I would suggest you dump your subaru While they still have some resale value. No Subaru cars in my future, ever! They have displayed the extent of their concern for their customers and i have expressed mine. I tell everyone i speak to to stay away from subaru and why. I am on numerous forums. Work will get around quickly.

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In talking with the person who sold me my 2010 Outback, I learned that most of the oil burning issues are with the Forrester and those with manual transmissions. It seems as though the Outbacks are built in Indiana while the Forrester is built in Japan. Now, normally I might think that a car built in Japan might be more desirable, but, remember these days cars are primarily built by robots and the factory is staffed by people, so, maybe the working conditions in the United States is better than Japan? In any case, it appears that while there's a problem, it's not all cars and less Subaru Outback models especially with automatic transmissions. Subaru's are specifically designed for AWD and use in inclement weather, that's why you see so many in the Northeast and Northwestern area of the United States. Obviously, not everyone will be happy with their car, but if the features and utility works for you, this is a great choice irrespective of some problem cars. If you find that your car is burning more than one quart of oil in 3,600 miles ask for an oil consumption test. Subaru of America told me that was their standard. People on this forum have gotten their engine rebuilt following the test and result, see the post by Betty above. Best luck with all of this. I seriously doubt that this issue with a sampling of some cars will bring down the value and service of all Subaru cars. There are legions of folks out there like myself who are delighted with their Subaru. Finally, it's just too easy to flame people and companies on the Internet. Very sad.

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Congrats to Bob for following through and dumping the defective Subaru to get something more reliable and environmentally friendly. Net loss is probably only a couple of thousand dollars. I think what would be ideal is a central wesite where Subaru owners can share information like this about the defects that the got with their new cars. If it can be the first thing you hit when you google "Subaru Problems", then it can save a lot of others the grief that Subaru stuck us with. I did a fair bit of review searching, and didn't stumble onto the sites discussing the oil issue until, well, until my oil light went off after a only a couple of months. Then I google "subaru oil" and low and behold, a littany of reports of class action lawsuits, lawsuits and complaints. Spread the word.

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Pablo, haven't you sold your Subaru yet? Didn't you say "smart money exits early "? Or maybe you're in the process of selling your car? Good luck with a replacement for a car that's as capable in the snow. I understand Subaru AWD cars are superior when it comes to traction and stability. There's a lot more to cars than some oil consumption, didn't you say that your oil consumption was not severe as others.

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Mark1922, I am trying to sell my car. The problem I have is an ethical one. When the potential buyer asks me "Is there anything wrong with the car? Why are you selling it?", I feel obliged to tell the truth, unlike my Subaru dealer. I've tried to focus on the positive, but that question always comes up, actually it is the first question asked. My car appears to be less severe than one of the posters here. I've only had to add two litres per first maintenance interval. As I've explained to you numerous times, I don't meet the threshold that Subaru Canada specifically quoted to me, of burning 1 litre per 2000km. At that rate I would have had to put 5 litres in per maintenance interval. So Mark1922, would you tell the truth to buyers??? "I'm selling the car because it burns oil at a very fast rate, I constantly have to top up the oil, I've seen a lot of information out there that suggests there were flaws in the engine manufacturing process, I'm concerned that there might be damage being done to my engine and catalytic converter and Subaru won't acknowledge it even though the car is only 5 months old,... but it is capable in the snow...". If I lie or hide that truth, I'm screwing over some family that I trick into buying it, and I'm as morally reprehensible as Subaru Corp. I know what you would say Mark1922, but I'm not willing to lie about that very important fact about my car. So I'm trying to sell, but facing a big loss. I will "help" as many other people know that if they buy a Subaru, they are rolling the dice. Maybe they'll get a good one, or maybe they won't. If they get a defective one though, don't think Subaru will make good.

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All cars use some oil, and those with samples outside the range should contact Subaru of America and demand the oil consumption test. Subaru makes highly safe and highly technological cars. The following link discusses the difference between engine design. http://rehermorrison.com/tech-talk-53-big-bore-or-long-stroke-which-is- better/ Below is a detailed discussion of how this changed from the EJ to FB engines. Found this online, "It's hip to be undersquare with 's new FB horizontally opposed 4-cam 4-cylinder, replacing the EJ that dates back to 1989. Where the EJ was oversquare (i.e., bore larger than stroke), the FB's smaller-diameter cylinders (84 mm versus 92) allow for more compact combustion chambers, a boon for better combustion and lower emissions. The trick was to increase the stroke of the crankshaft (now 90 mm versus 75), yet not increase the width of the longitudinally mounted engine—lest it cease to fit into existing Subaru vehicles. The solution was swapping the camshafts' belt drive for chain drive (and consequently, bulkier pulleys for smaller sprockets). The valve angle was reduced too, from 41 degrees to 27— further shrinking the size of the combustion chamber. For lower friction, cam lobes now ride on roller tappets and cylinder-bore roundness was improved, allowing for lower-tension piston rings. The intake system has been totally reworked to include a plastic plenum/runners assembly and four butterfly valves (in addition to the single throttle body) to enhance cylinder filling or promote tumble when needed. The upshot? About the same power as before in both 2.0- and 2.5-liter iterations, but slightly more midrange torque, sweeter air out the tailpipe and, on average, about 10 percent better fuel economy."

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Pablo, you're making a lot of assumptions here and your insinuation is offensive. If they ask you directly about your oil consumption, tell them the truth, which is, that your car is within the standard deviation. There are many reasons to sell a car; it doesn't meet your needs and/or you want a less expensive or better mileage vehicle. I still think that if your car is not burning excessive oil, you should keep it There is a "breaking in" period for cars and if your car is that new, it may stabilize or dissipate over time leveling off. How many miles are on your 5 month old car?

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Please see this thread, it is from Subaru owners about oil burning issue. http://www.subaruoutback.org/forums/showthread.php?t=165697 See graph as well on this thread.

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In case I had not posted this, see http://mobile.dudamobile.com/site/ allwheeldriveauto1? url=http%3A%2F%2Fallwheeldriveaut o.com%2Fsubaru-repair-seattle- 2013-subaru-legacy-outback-oil-use- explained%2F&dm_redirected=true# 2873

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@Mark1922. what?, did I insinuate you would mislead that family by saying "tell them the truth, which is, that your car is within the standard deviation". How wrong of me to suggest you'd respond like that. Wait, that is your quote. The real truth why I'm selling the car is as I said. I'm selling the car because it burns oil at a very fast rate, I constantly have to top up the oil, I've seen a lot of information out there that suggests there were flaws in the engine manufacturing process, I'm concerned that there might be damage being done to my engine and catalytic converter and Subaru won't acknowledge it even though the car is only 5 months old. Mark1922 please answer this question. If I respond to that question with the truth above, why I'm selling what would otherwise be a nearly new perfectly functioning car, do you think I will get fair price? I get what you are saying, try to hide my truth and dump my problem on an unsuspecting family. That is EXACTLY what you are suggesting, but that is AS unethical as what Subaru did to me. I AM NOT LIKE YOU. I am not a walking Subaru commercial. I'm not sure what happened in your life that you became one, but I don't really care. Lie, cheat, mislead whomever you want, I am not your mother. Don't suggest I lie to dump this problem on others, or twist this defect into "it has a great oil warning light system". People will laugh in your face when you say stuff like that.

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Pablo, two weeks ago you wrote "Mine is not that bad (yet), but the audacity of Subaru to deny this is abnormal or that I should be concerned??? Why would I even need an oil change because I've cycled a full oil fill in the maintenance period, like a constant flush of oil". And , you have said in other messages that you weren't sure if your Impreza had a problem, now in the last two weeks, the car is a "fast burner "! Sounds like your car has deteriorated very quickly and that's unfortunate. OK, my apologies and go ahead and tell them that, I'm not suggesting that you lie and neither would I if that were the case. I guess you're going to take a loss on this car. Better let it go and good luck to you. Sell it for what you can and maybe they can deal with Subaru. Any car that's this new can probably get the warranty transferred. Get a Honda or Toyota.

Mark 1952... are you kidding? I don't know you or where you work. I can't see your motives via this forum. However I can count your posts and their length and make a rather conservative judgement that you are either the greatest fan of Subaru the world has ever known or you are placed here by Subaru to communicate the Subaru excuses. You would have to admit that your comments would make really good damage control for Subaru, would you not? The facts remain, and they are ominous for Subaru owners. These cars are, regardless of Subaru's "standard deviation", consuming more oil than most any 1970's automobile and much, much more then any car newer than 1980 with, at least, twice the miles. Buyers should have been warned that they would need to top off oil at this rate before putting down their hard earned money. They were not! Bottom line.... you couldn't trust Subaru to do the right thing then and you can't trust them to do the right thing now. Keep your Subaru at your peril. Mine is gone. I lost $5000 but some of that would have been wear and tear so I guess I didn't get hurt too bad. However, once the word gets out (AND IT WILL) you many not do so well. I would not hesitate. I respect your honesty Pablo. There are times when you need to watch out for your own family's interests first and I think this is one of them. The saying "buyer beware" comes to mind. We were fooled by a car company. If we do what we can to inform others of this company's poor performance we will have done what we can to inform future buyers. To my fellow victims I say take care of yourself and your families. To mark 1952 I say, give it a rest. There are no solutions here. Subaru has made that pretty clear. You can get an engine swap and still have oil consumption problems. There really is not choice here for the Subaru owner. Live with bad oil consumption that might get much worse soon or dump the car. It is not a difficult decision. Procrastination will cost you dearly. I am done with mine but I do wish I had the time to picket Subaru to warn others. The dealers are in a real jam here. They have hundreds of thousands invested in a car company with a bad product. They can't afford to go out of business and the damage they do selling these things will certainly come back to haunt them when it comes to repeat sales. I will never buy a car from Tom Wood and he owns VW, Nissan, Lexus... dealerships. This will be my last post here. I hope those in pain will get out soon.

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About three weeks after buying my new 2015 manual trans forrester, my wife calls me to tell me oil light came on. I take it to Subaru and they change the oil and give me a date to return to see if it's using oil. They change the oil and three weeks later wife calls with same oil light problem. Dangerously low oil levels on my TV screen. I drive it Tia station and attended says I need to buy oil and put it in myself. What a price of crap. Thanks Subaru!!

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@zatguy. I'm not sure your complaint?....the oil burns quickly, as expected by Subaru, (reference page 1132 in some manual)......and the oil light comes on reliably by your own admission...what did you expect from a 2015?...a hover car that runs cleanly on dilithium crystals?

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thank you Bob for the last summary. This will be my last post because the objective of the forum is lost when I waste my time addressing Mark1922. To Mark: My oil consumption rate IS a problem. My quote that you misquoted the context: "I think most buyers that would have the oil light come and have to top up a half litre of oil 10 times in their first maintenance window might possibly agree with me that there's a problem. Mine is not that bad (yet)," Mine is not as bad as 1 litre per 2000km yet. It is NOT THAT BAD YET meaning less than 1 litre per 2000km. If you have a quote from earlier on suggesting I'm satisfied with the current burn level then please re-read it. I can't figure out if you're stupid and have poor comprehension, or whether you're just baiting people. If baiting, good job, cause you got me. I thought you were being serious at first until the oil light comment. Bob, I am not really suggesting any person is unethical for dumping their car on someone else, that's kinda the game in life and business but I cannot let Subaru off the hook. I agree the dealers are in a tight spot, and they need to be the ones putting pressure on corporate do properly release the data and deal with it. And if Subaru says buyer beware, I will say the consequence will be word getting out and damage to the brand. I will make sure of that. That is it for me on this site. If I hear anything concrete from Subaru, either acknowledging the problem, describing what it is and on what model to expect it, or any remedies, I'll be sure to post. Or anyone with a problem can just get their engine replaced like mythical Betty.

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Thanks for the info Pablo . In my manual, the oil consumption issue is addressed in section 11-10. I hope it's true. How long is the break in period? I haven't had a car that goes through two quarts of oil a month in ages. Can't imagine it will magically stop after a break in period .

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Hi Zatguy, sorry, in my attempt to be funny and poke fun at Subaru cheerleader Mark, (I was being sarcastic) and I may have mislead you, so THIS is my final post. Your Subaru problems are very serious based on the amount of oil it seems to be burning. A normal car should not need top ups of oil in its maintenance window despite what the manual says. You should go to your dealer, have it serviced, make sure the details of the oil consumption are written into the service record, ask for an oil consumption test. Keep track of the mileage and amount of oil you put in yourself. Also follow the Subaru guide for measuring oil (car temperature, level surface etc) because Subaru will likely try to misdirect the problem by blaming you. There are class action lawsuits but I'm not sure your model officially falls within the lawsuit. So yes, if you constantly have to top up your oil and constantly worry about the damage that may occur from it then your Subaru is a piece of shit because nobody buys a car expecting it to be such a headache. Sell it, compare sell price to market, and file a small claim against Subaru. That will be more effective than the class action, you can represent yourself, and Subaru will incur much more cost in sending a high priced lawyer to your town. Maybe if everyone does this, we can sue them in to bankruptcy.

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Pablo thanks again for the info. To be fair and not so emotional, I should be more precise in how I'm describing my brand new 2015 forrester manual trans (one step above base model with moon roof and ass warmer) situation. My wife always drives the car so I haven't been in touch as much as I should. I was in shock the first time she told me oil warnings were occurring because right away I figured engine leak . That happened around 2500 miles. Dip stick registered nothing. Took it in to service dept. They set up free oil use eval. I asked them why was it missing oil ? They said perhaps it wasn't put in at the port. Weeks passed and I missed the mileage window of opportunity to go back and get re evaluated on the oil use because I figured it was just a quirk. But the oil light and warning happened again around 5000 miles. So my bad there for not paying closer attention. I figured no way could this be happening with a new car. This was my first Subaru. Then i saw this thread here about oil consumption problems and figured uh oh. Next day I took it in and this time understandably I had to pay for the oil use eval because I put in oil because the dip stick didn't show anything and I didn't want a burned out engine. This time I'll watch the mileage window to go back like a hawk. This time the service guys also were more forthcoming . They said the thin synthetic oil is also a problem for other car companies (like Mercedes) the oil gets better image but dissipates they said maybe it's rings, and these cars use more oil blah blah. I didn't push too much because I'm not in a hurry to have my new car (which I love) torn apart with experimental fixes so I'll wait and see but from what I've seen these oil consumption problems have been here for years and Subaru still hasn't fixed the problem. I blame myself for listening to my wife when we were shopping around for cars. She kept saying over and over "I want an outback I want an outback" . I liked the way the Forrester drove and we compromised " I looked at all the usual consumer glowing reports about Subarus and didn't delve near enough into information for a major purchase like this. I could have found the info about oil consumption problems in foresters in five minutes when I bought this one back in Dec. but nooooo...really though what other choices did I have? I had to have an all wheel drive with a manual trans. Toyota RAV4 and Honda CR-V are all CVTs automatic . Not an option for me. I've resigned myself to checking the oil and topping for the life of the car. Not the end of the world I guess . At least the service guys told me the low oil sensors are set to go off at half a quart low . (They also felt perhaps that benchmark is too cautious ) haha it's not too cautious for me. So I have time to put the oil in. I asked them where is the oil going.? He said out. I said through the catalytic converter? He said no. Of course not one person at the dealership warned me when I bought it but that's understandable ...bad for business right ? At least when i do drive this car with the moon roof and ass warmer ( a step above base model ) I love the shit out of it !! So maybe this lemon will turn into lemonade. Big investment to be so casual about though but my piece of mind is more important so I'm going to go through the steps but in the end, I'll stand for my decision and its on me. If this car gives me another ten years , I'll be good. If not, I'll be good. Thanks again for all the help and info Pablo and be careful. These corporate people can probably buy and sell us both.

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To Mark 1952: Thank you for all the information . Everything comes in pairs and it's important to know both sides of an issue before making an informed decision.

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I bought a 2015 Subaru Forester in Nov 2014. Now about 3000 miles and low oil level light came on while driving on a trip!!! Checked the oil on a level surface- dipstick -no oil except on the sides of the dipstick. Checked the oil level next morning with cold engine - dipstick bone dry!! Took pictures of the odometer and oil level light. Took it to the Subaru dealer. An oil consumption test is in progress!! I wish I had known about this before I bought this vehicle. I have had Toyotas, Acuras and Lexus over past several decades -never had to add a drop of oil between routine maintenance schedules.

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I have read every post on this issue, and I am confused. Is the oil burning problem with EVERY size engine Subaru makes, or mostly in 4 cyl. models? I am looking to buy a 2015 3.5r Outback, and will not if this is an issue with this model. Any one who has a 2015 3.5, I would appreciate any feedback on this.

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Our 2015 Forester is 2.5i Limited/FFI , 4 cylinder.

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Omitted to mention that my 2015 Forester is automatic!

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2015 Forrester manual trans one step above base. Things might be looking up. Checked oil on dip stick a week ago after getting back from the dealer' 5000 initial oil use eval (I botched follow up for the first one at 2500 mi) and drove the car 1000 mi this week and oil level on dip stick remained the same. Maybe the break in period theory is for real. Regardless, I've never had a car I enjoy driving this much. After going through a tough northeast winter, we felt one with the road in all driving conditions. I hope it passes when the follow eval is due.

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I purchased a 2015 Forester on July 1st....After 6 months and 4000 miles the car had barely used any oil.

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hello Gang I have a 2014 Impreza, manual transmission and 32000 kms on it. Today my oil light came on, 1000km before it is due for an oil change. This happened in the first 10 km as well, but not between the next oil change. Also, I am wondering if anybody has had trouble with the shifter not budging when the clutch is in? That happened this winter and I had to call a tow truck. As they pushed the car something unlocked and the shifter would move again. Not too pleased with the Impreza. I also live in Canada.

I have a 2014 Forester and have oil consumption problems. I am currently working with Subaru and staying hopeful that they will do the right thing. I am not giving up on them quite yet.

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I posted this elsewhere but went into North Bay Subaru in Ontario. They say a Litre of oil every 9000 km is fine and that my oil light is going off prematurely. manual transmission, 2014 Impreza base model, hatchback. Never had a vehicle that I had to worry about the oil before. they also said that it won't damage The engine. I guess we will see what happens now they've updated it....

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I have a 2013 Crosstrek with the 2.0i engine and CVT transmission has 20,000 miles. Used 2 quarts in the last 6000 miles. Want to trade it but not sure if the problem has been fixed on the 2015 models.

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I have the same issue. On last trip 2013 forester automatic used 15 ounces in 900 miles. All interstate. Our dealership in Gainesville fl is very supportive and we know once we start and complete the consumption test we will receive a new short block. So we came oh so close to trading in for a new 2015 forester but ultimately we decided we could not take a chance of literally being burned twice. I called suburu corporate and the tsb does not apply to the 2015's. So it's either a new Honda or Toyota suv or ultimately a short block. But my wife really loves the suburu. But when we had to add the 15 ounces of oil at a gas station (waited 15 mins foe engine to cool) in Virginia and nearly froze having to use a measuring cup etc for accurate documentation much of the fun of owning our suburu evaporated just like the oil.

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Subaru is not the only car that has Oil consumption issues. See this article about Honda vehicles http://www.hondaproblems.com/trends/excessive-oil-consumption/

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My 2015 Forester Ltd , automatic , is under an oil consumption test starting at 3200 miles. The dealer filled it up by about 1/3 quart above the upper hole. Now at 3800 miles ( half way through the test) the dipstick estimates about 2/3 quart consumption. Sure, the vehicle runs great, but my 'eyesight' is on the oil consumption!

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Thanks for all the posts. I have a 2013 Impreza and am running my own consumption test before having the dealer do one before the warranty runs out. One thing we all can do is contact Consumer Reports Auto Division; it may be the most influential car purchasing magazine across the country. Subaru may listen to them as well. Good luck to all. Ricardo2030

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We bought a 2015 manual Subaru Forester last June, based on Subaru's good reputation. The oil light came on at about 3500 miles and we have to add a quart every 3-4000 miles (recommended oil change is 6000 miles) We travel fulltime and have taken it in to at least 1/2 dozen Subaru dealerships to be checked and have the oil changed. We documented and emailed with Subaru and they just keep telling us it is not a problem unless it uses oil every 1000 miles. Really?!?! Like many of you, we did not expect our NEW car to use oil. I'm very disappointed in Subaru and we will NEVER buy another one.

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I bought (and still own) a 2012 Forester (manual). The oil consumption issues started at around 30K miles. To the dealer a couple of times for the "oil consumption test", to no avail. To say the dealership explains away/avoids the issue is an understatement. I will NEVER buy or recommend Subaru to anyone. When my friend text me this am that she was on her way to look at a new Outback, I directed her to the Honda dealer and also to the myriad of info/forums/questions like these…So sad, because I really thought they were an ethical company!!!

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4/17/2015 I just bought Subaru Forester 2015. I will see!

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I just bought a 2015 Forester and was horrified when I stumbled across these links about the oil and consequent lawsuit. This is my 4th Subi and NEVER seen this issue. My question/solution: funny isn't it that this really only started since they began using synthetic oil in 2010. I was ALWAYS told that a new engine should NEVER have synthetic oil in it, until it is properly broken in and the the rings are seated. My own personal belief is that this is the problem, not "defective rings on the piston". My car has 200 miles on it and I will be draining the stock oil tonight and replacing it with Castrol or Valvoline conventional for the first 3000 miles. I will report back in the future. We drive about 20k a year so I will know in short order of this does the trick. Anyone else tried this fix yet? I'm not sure why Subi still insists on putting synthetic in from the factory when this may be a quick fix. If this doesn't work - hello new CRV. That will suck because we LOVE this car! So much glass, I feel like I'm in a convertible.

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Just bought a 2015 Forester with a manual. It's a used one with 10K miles and I didn't know about this issue. I really hope the car wasn't traded it because they have this issue. We will see what happens.

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Bought my 2015 Legacy, automatic transmission in October, have 19000 miles and oil light came on yesterday. Added about 1/2 a quart Took to dealer today and they said....Oh that's normal. I'm not happy, this is why I bought a new car!

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Check with your dealer and service department to see if you can use 5-30 synthetic oil? I found a post online for someone who tried this and their car stopped burning oil soon after they switched. Good luck.

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Hello Everyone, I have a 2015 Subaru Crosstrek this car will be a year old at the end of April, My last oil change was in Dec 2014 and my car has 18,000 and is not due for a oil change until 21,000 my oil light is on and my husband check and my oil is low. This is b*** someone needs to do something about this, why are we putting oil in new cars and why are this NEW cars burning oil as well. This is ridiculous we spend thousands of dollars on this cars and this is what we get. Not fair. If anyone finds out about a law suit please let me know.

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Well, you're putting a lot of miles on your car pretty fast, here's some info for you. http://www.torquenews.com/1084/2nd-new-oil- consumption-lawsuit-suddenly-filed-against-subaru, Subaru has been performing oil consumption tests on request. If your car burns more than one quart every 3,600 miles, it's a problem. Call Subaru of America and talk with them. Good luck.

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Thank you Mark- I drive a lot to work and back home but this miles are all highway miles, regardless the of the miles I was told by the dealer that I need to get oil changes every 7,500 because of the synthetic oil. But lets see what happens when I go to the dealer. Thank you for the information and for the good luck I might need it. :)

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A note to all: try using a heavier weight oil (5-30 to start). Subaru recommends using 0-20 oil to promote good gas mileage. This oil is very, very thin and can squeeze past the rings in the engine. Heavier oil - less squeezes past. As the government keeps raising the bar on MPG requirements, the car manufactures have to get creative and figure out how to reduce friction in the engine and car to meet the new demands. Subaru tried to make the oil ring on the piston with less tension to reduce the friction in the engine. This decrease in tension allows the now much thinner oil (0-20) to squeeze past. You can't do anything about the oil ring (unless you rebuild the engine) but you can change oil. Try it. It may help.

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Yes, this last post validates what I posted earlier about some other person's experience. Again, I would call Subaru of America and ask them about it. You've got nothing to lose and you might as well start a dialog with them. There's a certain percentage of cars affected by this oil problem, maybe around 10 percent or less I've read. It doesn't matter if it's affecting your car, you've got to deal with it and document every step of the way. They have been replacing engines for some people. Stay with it and good luck.

Don't change the type of oil unless you want to VOID your warrantee. Though you may be correct in your oil consumption reduction you will put yourself in harms way for any future repairs under your warrantee. I was once told that my oil consumption would get better as the motor broke in. It got worse. I also noticed a decrease in fuel mileage. Who knows what this oil is doing to the oxygen sensors just distal to the exhaust manifold. I have already bailed out and sold my 2014 Forrester (automatic) with a little under 25,000 miles on it. What good will it do you to put in another engine that will also burn oil. Get out now before the world finds out what Subaru has done and the value of your car goes to dirt. It sux but only the lawyers will win in a class action suit that won't be completed until your car is 7 years old and draining you of your cash. It's cheaper to dump it now and move on. I had my 2014 for 2 years. I bought it when they first came out. I loved everything about the car but this oil problem. It is just to significant a problem to let go. I suggest you document and call till you are crazy if you intend to keep the car. However, I would ask you to consider the total cost to yourself in frustration, oil, anger... I calculated that I lost about $5000 in value when I traded the Forrester in on a new 2015 Nissan Rogue. Not bad. Wait until the whole world knows about the oil consumption problem and it will be difficult to get that good a trade in value. Just my $0.02 Bob

When the manufacturer tells you that 10.8 ounces of consumption in 1200 miles is considered "OK" there are no "GOOD" engines. This is not a 10% of the cars problem it is a 100% engineering screw up problem. Had Subaru made a 7 quart system with a 3 quart top off device to keep the oil in specification between oil changes people would have paid the extra $ for the 10 Quarts of oil and not complained much knowing they get good gas mileage. However they didn't and we get a LOW OIL light that alarms us and makes us stop our journey to search for a rare synthetic blend of oil. What engineer thought that would fly? What marketing VP though that was not going to become an issue. When is the last time you saw a car use less oil when it got over the 50,000 mile mark. NEVER! If it is unacceptable now it will be unbearable later when your warrantee is toast.

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Wow Bob, sounds like you're a pretty disgruntled client of Subaru. It's unfortunate that you had to take a $5,000 loss. OK, I just spoke to Tara at Subaru of America. They're aware of the oil consumption problem on certain engines. Again, all cars are not affected. What she said was " anyone with an affected car and under 5 years or 60,000 miles as part of the power train warranty should take their car back to the dealer for the oil consumption test. If that car is using more than one third a quart of oil in 1,200 mile or one full quart every 3,600 miles, they will work with you to fix your car. You have to follow the rules and get the tests done for them to confirm that. Is it worth some time and effort on your part, YES IT IS! You cannot just sit there and shoot from the sidelines and trash Subaru just because you think their cars are problem cars. You said you liked everything else about the car and unfortunately, some cars had problems. By the way, all cars can have problems, they're machines you know. I hope you have a better experience with the Nissan Rogue; I imagine you have the CVT transmission? I have read reports that the CVT in the Nissan is not as responsive as the Subaru, but, don't know if that's true? Our family had a Nissan once and it was more of a problem car than either of our Hondas or Toyota's. Good luck.

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One more thing, Customer Service at Subaru of America does not recommend using any other weight oil than what is stated in your owner's manual. It might cause a problem. What you need to do is bring the car in for the oil consumption test.

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What kind of problem? You mean like burning a quart of oil every 1500 miles. Now THAT would be problem! Oh wait, um.... Don't be a sheep. Think on your own.

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Your decision. I called them about another issue and asked them to comment on this oil burning issue. You realize that they modified the old EJ Series engine with the newly designed FB series. Those engines are not the same and have different tolerances and valve placement. Short answer is this, if you burn more than one quart every 3,600 NOT 1,500 as you stated, bring it back to the dealer for the oil consumption test. You're not going to solve this by just complaining, talk with them. Here's the information on the FB engine http://www.caranddriver.com/news/subaru-fb-series-engine-subaru-flat- four-engines

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Thanks for the link but it's broken. I'd like to read it if you have a copy or know if another link. I understand the new engines are different in ways. I guess my frustration lies in the fact we just plunked down $30g's for a car I had hoped would serve us well with minimal BS. I laughed at the salesman as he tried to sell us the extended warranty for 100k miles. I believe my exact words were, "if you want me to buy the extended warranty then you better sell me a shitty car". That's how much faith I had in my new purchase. I've owned 4 Subarus. One had 260k plus miles on the original engine and tranny. Used a little oil, but I think most was leaking past the valve cover gasket. We have 2 little girls, a small house which we are constantly renovating and bills which never seem to end. (I know, we're like 99% of America, or at least Subaru owners). We bought this car based on the excllent safety rating and my past experiences with my 4 other Subarus. We want to spend time with our girls, not driving the NEW car back and forth for oil consumption tests. I hate walking out of my house in the morning past our new $30000 investment and feeling a rock in my stomach instead of a smile on my face. I want to love this car, and I do, but it's like being married to a manic- depressive or something. Im not sure how long this happy phase is going to continue for. Maybe things will always be good, or maybe we'll be nursing a sick car not knowing how long the valves will last until they burn up or the cat's fail from all the excess oil burning off on them. I guess I'm just really frustrated.

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OK, I found this, http://www.caranddriver.com/news/subaru-fb-series-engine-subaru-flat-four-engines; here's the salient info for you. New Heads on the (New) Block-Despite all the similarity to its predecessor’s specifications, the FB is all-new, including the block and the heads. The biggest fundamental difference between old and new is that the FB’s camshafts are chain driven, with all variations of the engine now carrying twin cams in each head. Going to chain-driven cams allows the valves to be placed at a narrower angle to each other. This let the engine designers shrink the bore, from 99.5 mm to 94. The smaller-diameter cylinder and increased stroke (now 90 mm, up 11) lets the FB suck air in more quickly, and the elongated cylinder also results in less unburned fuel during cold starts. Both intake and exhaust cams are equipped with variable valve timing. Even though the stroke is slightly longer, the FB’s exterior dimensions are basically unchanged from the EJ’s. Subaru achieved this by employing asymmetrical connecting rods like those it used to increase the stroke of the flat-six in the Tribeca without drastically changing the engine. The lamb-chop-shaped rods also ease assembly of the bottom end. Subaru says 80 percent of the engine’s cooling capacity is routed to the head, and it even added a cooling circuit to the exhaust-gas recirculation channel. By doing this, it was able to reduce NOx emissions. The intake manifold is plastic, like the outgoing EJ’s (save the cast-aluminum unit on the STI), but this new manifold incorporates four tumble-generation valves, one just upstream of each port. They look like half of a throttle valve and, through electronic control, manipulate the intake flow to maximize efficiency. I read your message about declining the extended warranty. OK, how many miles are on your car, because, the oil consumption test and fix for this is good for 5 years or 60,000 miles from Subaru. Are you telling me that you have more than 60,000 miles? What year is your car? I'm really sorry that you're going through all of this with topping off the oil, just like other people. but, you have to understand that this is a machine and mistakes happen. Even though the robots build most of the parts on cars today, the machines are still managed by people and people make errors. OK, as far as the extended warranty goes, I figure when I buy a car new or my recent CPO car, I ALWAYS GET THE EXTENDED WARRANTY TO 100,000 MILES. WHY? It's cheap insurance and I would rather shift the risk to someone else, that's what insurance is shifting the risk. Risk is around us everywhere in life and if it makes me sleep better at night knowing that it's one less thing to worry about, sure, I'll shell out the extra bucks for that. When you've spent $30,000 on a car, what's a few extra dollars. As for your immediate problem, I have two pieces of advice for you. Do everything you can to DOCUMENT YOUR OIL USAGE TO THE DEALER, provided your not over 60,000 miles and stick to the program. I DON'T WORK FOR SUBARU, BUT, I CAN TELL YOU THIS, THEY HAVE A LONG STORIED REPUTATION TO UPHOLD, THEIR PARENT COMPANY, FUJI HEAVY INDUSTRIES IN JAPAN STARTED 100 YEARS AGO AND IF YOU GIVE THEM A CHANCE AND WORK WITH THEM, THEY WILL HELP YOU. But, if you muddy the waters by putting in the wrong oil and don't follow their instructions, they will probably tell you that they can't help you. Good luck and keep a journal and take names of the people you interact with at the local dealer. Then, write a letter or call Subaru of America and get a case going. At least one or maybe two people on this forum got their engines either rebuilt or replaced, at least that what they said. Go back further in this thread and see that Betty did that and was happy. And, one final thing, you can attract a lot more bees with honey than you can with vinegar.

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Update, Betty's response might have been in a different thread, but, same issue.

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Folks - Maybe this has been mentioned before, but below is a link to a document explaining the oil ring issue. This whole issue concerns me because I just bought a new 2015 Outback, and somebody previously posted that they have a 2015 OB with oil consumption problems. The most important part of this document, IMO, is this statement: "The updated piston rings started being used in production as of May 8th 2013, so if you have a newer than that production date and are suffering from high oil consumption this TSB as currently written does not apply to your Subaru, it’s that simple". Is this guy correct in that statement? If not, can you point to documentation that states otherwise? I'm not doubting that some are experiencing excessive oil usage with vehicles manufactured after the above date, I just wonder if it's VERY VERY few people in that camp and it's a different issue than the piston ring issue. The article: http://allwheeldriveauto.com/subaru-repair-seattle-2013- subaru-legacy-outback-oil-use-explained/

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Link didn't work that well, here's the full text of that message here. I have been debating on whether or not I wanted to post another article about oil use in a Subaru, but I feel it’s important for you to be informed about your Subaru and have a little ammunition when dealing with a Subaru dealer. First of all unless a car uses more than whats considered normal by both industry standards and the car maker there is nothing wrong in the car makers view. There are so many variables as to why an engine may use oil, all of these are actually clearly stated in Subaru’s TSB (Technical Service Bulletin) on page 2 in regards to oil consumption, and they mirror TSB’s that have been put out by other car companies at different times in history. Subaru TSB 02-143-13R Here is what we can factually talk about, some Subaru Outback and Legacy models, according to the TSB, 2013 models only, may suffer from piston oil control rings that did not seal during the break in period, the fix is to install a new set of piston rings with an updated ring surface. The problem is that in order to install new rings the entire engine must come out and come apart to do that procedure. The updated piston rings started being used in production as of May 8th 2013, so if you have a newer than that production date and are suffering from high oil consumption this TSB as currently written does not apply to your Subaru, it’s that simple. If you own an affected vehicle that falls under this TSB you do have a little work cut out for you, as Subaru makes the Franchised Dealers jump through a few hoops before they authorize this large of a repair under warranty, some of this is also outlined in the TSB. Some speculation. One very probable situation is the use of 0w20 synthetic oil from the onset goes against what most experienced engine builders suggest for break in oil. The reason car manufacturers have started using 0w20 is to help improve fuel economy. The thing to keep in mind is that the internal tolerances of the current FB engine is designed for use with 0w20 oil, switching to 5w30 may cause engine failure and you do so at your own risk. While its true that this can happen to cars regardless of the transmission, I have written before that the CVT transmission is not conducive to proper break-in without forcing you to drive different than just put it in gear and go. The Federal government didn’t instruct car companies to build cars that don’t use oil, they instead told them you must reach fuel economy standards of 36 by 2017 and 54.5 MPG by 2025. that’s the world we live in, we are here today talking about Subaru’s but don’t fool yourself into thinking Subaru is the only one taking lumps as there is a shift in how the car must function. Subaru makes a limited number of models, they simply do not have a Prius, Insight, Fit or Focus etc. that achieve high fuel economy to offset the models that get much worse fuel economy, as such Subaru is just abut the only manufacture that has to increase fuel economy across all models rather than introduce a low end car that achieves 50 mpg to off set the models using more fuel. The good news is that Subaru may very well become a market leader in fuel economy related technology as a result, or they may toss in the towel and make a 3 cylinder front wheel drive small car. Buying a new car is not a guarantee that you will never have issues with it, instead it means that if there is an issue that is covered under warranty, it will be taken care of by the car maker. Subaru with this TSB is in fact acknowledging the issue and taking care of the cars with problems, once there is proof of such. Subaru is a good car maker that will take care of this issue, but most warranty repairs are a hassle and this is a big hassle. Good article. You've really got to be on top of this to get these repairs done.

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Thanks, Mark. A space snuck in between "2013-" and "subaru-legacy...". It seems that when I put a link in the response window, and the link wraps, then a space is automatically added. Copy the link, just be sure there are no spaces between dashes. It may show up as "%20". If so, delete that.

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But the meat of the question, and I hope somebody knows definitively, is if my Outback is built after May 8, 2013, am I in the clear as far as the piston ring issue is concerned? Thanks.

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Joe, if you want to know for sure, call Subaru of America at 800-782- 2783. Give them your VIN number and they will be able to tell you precisely when your car was built. I called them to inquire about my 2010 Subaru Outback 2.5 Limited on the issue of the multi layered head gaskets. They were introduced on the 2010 models and my car was built in September 2009. They confirmed that my car had the newer head gaskets, yes, they are that good and very nice people to talk to. They're concerned about the oil burning issue and seem willing to help you work with your local dealership. It cannot hurt to start a dialog with them. Best of luck.

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Joe, I'm posting this again so you can read it, from online source. Here's a little more detail on this subject of DHOC vs. SOHC engines, As I stated before, the DHOC engine design in the FB series just complicated the former EJ series engine. See web link below for explanation, both engines have 16 valves, but, the engineering is different. http://paultan.org/2005/06/22/sohc-vs-dohc-valvetrains/

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Someone posted this a short time ago and while I received it, it didn't show up on the forum, here it is ; A CarGurus user (rchsts) answered a question you are following: "Has anybody had problems with excessive oil consumption in the 2015 Subaru Forester?". They wrote: "An E-mail response today to a thread on Consumer Reports forum on this issue: CustDlrServices@subaru.com Apr 22 (4 days ago) to me Dear XXXX Thank you for contacting Subaru of America, Inc. We appreciate you taking time out of your day to contact us. We welcome your contact, as it relates to a future Subaru Forester purchase. The Forester is certainly a very popular model for our company. At this time, a Subaru engine may use up to 1 quart of oil per 1,200 miles. This is considered normal and the information is located in the Owners Manual. We have not changed the engine design for the Forester recently. We back every vehicle sold with a warranty. Should you experience any manufacturing defects within the warranty period, they will be addressed. We also have a very accessible Customer Retailer Services Department, where this email was received. You can always contact us if needed. Again, thank you for your contact. Sincerely, Lana Downs Subaru of America, Inc. Customer/Dealer Services Department 1-800-SUBARU3 (1-800-782- 2783) Service Request Number: 1-9382837010"

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Unfortunately, there's lot of misinformation about how much oil is normal When I called the other day to inquire about another issue, they repeated to me as they explained before that they now have updated the information that is published in the owner's manual. The new information is this, if your car burns more than 1/3 a quart of oil in 1,200 miles, it is considered excessive. So, it would be one full quart every 3,600 miles. Call them at Subaru of America if you don't believe me, I spoke with Tara.

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Joe, just to be clear, you have a 2013 Subaru Outback. How many miles are on your car and do you have the Four with the CVT transmission? --Mark

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OK, here's Bettys post from a few months ago, she got a new engine, kudos to he for the efforts. "I have a 2013 Subaru Forester that had the oil consumption problem. Dealer at 40K miles did the oil consumption test I had to request it. Or I should say demand it. Then it showed that it was using over 1 Quart of oil in 1500 miles. So got a new engine block put in. Problem solved. No engine is being used anymore. Have 10K on new engine now. I was also told at the begining when I bought the car new that there was a breakin period and the oil usuage only got worse. So then Subaru did right by me. Replaced the engine. Apparently they had another manufacturer supply their piston rings and they are just a tid bit off and allow oil to be burned by the engine. (not good). But AutoNation Subaru in Colorado did a great job and got my new engine in, in 2 days and cars has ran with no oil burning since." You can do this to if you are diligent and follow the instructions that Subaru and your dealer tells you to do.

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earthdog78@gmail.com

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Zatguy, just saw your post, but it didn't load on Web Hello Markw1952, A CarGurus user (Zatguy) answered a question you are following: "Has anybody had problems with excessive oil consumption in the 2015 Subaru Forester?". They wrote: "I posted a few complaints about a 2015 Forrester one step above base, moon roof, seat warmers, manual trans I bought in Early Dec. 14, after shocking me during the initial break in period with oil lights, the oil consumption problem seems to have settled down. The car did well (service advised me it was exactly where it should be) on the oil consumption test . It hasn't been using oil from what I can see on the dipstick, and I've been checking it like a hawk, this past month. I love everything about this car, especially how it drives. Might replace side mirrors if possible. I can't get used to them , even though my wife primarily drives it. Her and my daughter love the moon roof. I'll post if there's a change." SO, WHY DON'T YOU LIKE THE WAY IT DRIVES??? GOOD TO HEAR THAT THE OIL BURNING HAS SUBSIDED.

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Mark, I actually have a 2015 Outback and based on what the TSB below states, I should have a vehicle with the updated piston rings. From page 3 of TSB-02-143-13R: "COUNTERMEASURE IN PRODUCTION The updated piston rings were incorporated into production at SIA on May 8, 2013, starting with VIN D3321342 (Outback) and D3048058 (Legacy)." The "D" in the VIN is for "2013", "E" for "2014" and "F" for 2015. Mine begins with "F". My ONLY question is, is the TSB correct? If so, then people here with vehicle build dates after May 8, 2013 AND have oil consumption problems have something OTHER than the piston ring issue. Either that, or the new rings did NOT fix the problem, which would be another new (and embarrassing issue) for Subaru.

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Joe, I see. So, how do you like the CVT? And, do you have the four or six cylinder?

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Zatguy, my mistake, just re-read your post and see that you do like the way it drives. sorry. Do you have the CVT in your Forester?

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earthdog78@gmail.com

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Zatguy, did you consider the CVT transmission or even test drive it? What was your reasons for getting the manual? I've got a friend who has a 2009 Forester with the manual and its developed this bird noise in the clutch and is very annoying. Even replaced the clutch and the noise is still there. I think that it might be a throw out bearing? Your car is still pretty new, but, be aware of this potential issue.

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earthdog78@gmail.com

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Zatguy, saw your post earlier about you choosing the manual over automatic transmission and that you skipped the Outback model so you could get the manual in the Forester. Strange, but, that earlier post disappeared? Maybe you didn't know or just preferred the manual, but , the CVT transmission would have given you better fuel mileage. You also mentioned that you were concerned about the CVT transmission stalling on you, what did you mean by that? I cannot imagine that you by that you meant the engine cutting out? That does not happen. Anyway, enjoy your car. I love the way the CVT keeps the engine always in the right gear and power band range for acceleration.

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Zatguy, just saw your reply about being intimidated by automatic transmissions? OK, I imagine that your afraid that they won't hold up over the manual gearbox? Actually, the automatic transmissions today are benter than manuals and save more fuel. The new Subaru Lineartronic CVT is one of the most advanced new transmissions on the market today and has been written up by various car magazines as the market leader. Plus, in case you were not aware, the CVT transmission has paddle shifters on the steering column and you can choose the manual mode and it is six speed as well. The paddle shifters are six pre determined stops on the transmission, but, in reality the gearbox is an infinite number of gears from start to top speed. The CVT transmission is actually a simpler and more advanced technological transmission from an engineering standpoint than conventional automatic transmissions and should last longer. This, plus the fact that the system is continually changing gears while you're driving in all situations makes this something of a marvel by modern standards. So, maybe next time? ? Good luck with your car.

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I have a standard transmission and would take the standard over an automatic anyway. That is one of the reasons I ended up with a Subaru. I prefer the control I Have with the standard, especially in the winter months. I know the automatic is slightly better on gas but I have been driving a standard most of my life and wouldn't trade for an automatic. Plus...I think they are just way more fun to drive!

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Wow, I'll bet you never even test driven a Subaru CVT? I'm sure if you had, you would discovered that they have paddle shifters on the steering column and you can either drive that way or in fully automatic mode which actually is very smooth. Plus, it's known fact that automatics not only shift faster, last longer and get better fuel economy. And, in case you didn't know this either, Subaru manual transmissions are not really that good, so, I hope that works out well for you. I've got a friend who regrets that she opted for the manual and has a bird noise every time they depress the clutch. Fun to drive??? I live in major metropolitan area with so much traffic, I considered yanking the old clutch out of my last manual car and decided I would never go back to a manual. One final thing, there will always be more people interested in buying a used automatic transmission over a manual on the secondary market so, automatic transmission cars have greater resale-value.

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On the contrary, I did try an automatic with paddle shifters. I like to be the one actually shifting the gears, a paddle shifter is still an automatic...you aren't actually shifting the gears, you are waiting for a computer to do it. Maintenance costs have been almost non-existent for my manual transmissions, including brakes. I like being connected to my car.... My last car was a Corolla , standard transmission and I had the brakes done once or twice in 320 000 kms. I do not live in a city, but close to one. I drive in crazy winter conditions with unpredictable events like moose and deer...so I like my standard for many reasons. Control is the major one. I like not having to touch my brakes on an icy road... My preference. Doesn't have to be yours. I will drive standard transmission until a) they just don't make them anymore or b) I get too old to use a clutch. Driving a standard is a joy to me not a chore. Enough said.

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OK, I see, you shift faster than the computer. Really don't know how that's possible, but, yes, to each his own. Years ago, I had manual shift cars and at one time I would have agreed with you 100 percent, but , today, I would definitely not. Good luck. I've heard some negative things about the clutch and manual gearbox.

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Experiencing the same problem with my 2013 Forester. My car is typically down 1/2 quart per 1200 miles however past 30K miles it's now one full quart at 1200 miles. I'm extremely upset over this, especially that my light never comes on. I don't want to worry about this kind of thing which is why I bought a NEW CAR and a SUBIE to boot. I want out of my loan and I want my money back but of course, we the consumers are screwed. If Subie advertised this nonsense of acceptable oil consumption (and coolant consumption btw, check your coolant and manuals!) I would have never bought the car, and probably you guys wouldn't have either. In my opinion having the consumer come to find these problems only as they occur or once the car is purchased and manual is in hand is WRONG and DECEPTIVE business practice. In any case my dealer is working with me to rebuild the short block of the engine that houses the piston rings and apparently that should fix the problem but only time and miles (dangerously close to the end of my warranty too) will tell. I will more than likely though trade it in for a HONDA CRV and never deal with Subie again. And SUBARUSCREW, I emailed you, check your spam box.

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Every auto maker has a guideline for oil consumption. When i worked at Ford it was 1 QT every 1500 miles, Dodge is 1QT every 1100 miles and I was recently informed by GM that 1 QT every 500 miles is acceptable. Subaru guideline is 1 QT every 1200 miles. If research oil consumption you will find that just about EVERY vehicle on the market uses some oil between oil changes. MY 2012 F150 with a V8 engines and 32000 miles uses 1 Qt every 5000 miles. I am more inclined to think it is due to using synthetic oils and lighter oil weights. Vehicles that use 10w30 oil seem to not use oil as rapidly as those that use 5w30 or 0w20

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I have a 2013 Subaru Forester that had the oil consumption problem. Dealer at 40K miles did the oil consumption test I had to request it. Or I should say demand it. Then it showed that it was using over 1 Quart of oil in 1500 miles. So got a new engine block put in. Problem solved. No engine is being used anymore. Have 10K on new engine now. I was also told at the begining when I bought the car new that there was a breakin period and the oil usuage only got worse. So then Subaru did right by me. Replaced the engine. Apparently they had another manufacturer supply their piston rings and they are just a tid bit off and allow oil to be burned by the engine. (not good). But AutoNation Subaru in Colorado did a great job and got my new engine in, in 2 days and cars has ran with no oil burning since.

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Betty, you tell them. ...you're an inspiration for the people on this post who are eligible to get the oil consumption test done. There's rules for that and they can contact Subaru of America to find out. Unfortunately, a number of people on this post were not diligent enough to do the same things you did to justify getting a new engine. It takes a certain level of work and documentation on your part. Some people don't have the persistence to keep on top of this to get a new engine like you have. Even though I cited your earlier posts, some people doubted that this . I'm glad for you and that you stated this again. For some reason, this oil consumption problem seemed more prevalent on the Forester model with the manual transmission. I think that's because a lot of people driving the manual transmissions like to rev up the engine more. The automatic transmissions shift more smoothly and are usually not running at high rpm's especially the CVT transmission on the newer cars. Congrats to Auto Nation Subaru, I looked them up online and see that they have a 4.3 out of 5 rating, that's what I call excellent customer service. Good thing you're dealing with them. This is exactly the kind of business that obviously values customers and wants their repeat business. You cannot do better than word of mouth advertising.

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I purchased a 2015 Subaru Forester, manual transmission, in May 2014. Since date of purchase, I have had to CONSISTENTLY add oil between oil changes far in excess of what anyone would consider normal. After having my low oil light come on after driving only 1000 miles after topping off oil (on a number of occasions), my local dealer agreed to an oil consumption test. I have had to endure a FULL YEAR of having to stop what I was doing to get myself to the dealer every time the oil light came on. It has been extremely inconvenient to spend hours of unplanned time in a dealership during the first year of new car ownership. I purchased a new car so that I could have reliable, relatively care-free and worry-free transportation but that has definitely not been my experience. I have made a lot of noise about this issue and have refused to allow them to tell me it was 'normal usage', and have finally been told that I will be able to have the short block replaced under warranty due to unusually high oil consumption. I have had to wait several weeks for my turn in the shop, as there were others in the queue before me to get their short blocks replaced. Obviously this is a major issue on these newer Subaru models. This is actually my third Subaru Forester, and with 100% certainty I can tell you it will be my LAST Subaru. This coming from a person who thought I would be loyal to the brand for life. NEVER AGAIN. My husband is a Honda man, and he has NEVER had to add a drop of oil between oil changes, and his Hondas are the most reliable cars we've ever owned. Other than routine maintenance, they have run without issue. I will hope for the best with the new short block, but I am not convinced it will resolve the problem as it still uses the same oil grade which I have been told - by the techs at the dealership no less - is contributing to this oil consumption problem. Biggest headache I have ever had with a vehicle. It has been absolutely ridiculous. If I wouldn't have lost so much money on a trade-in, the car would have been gone a long time ago. You have been warned.

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I Dumped my Subaru off in a trade in at the local Nissan dealership. I didn't get hurt that bad on trade in. The short block swap is major work but simply switches the block with the same issues. Save yourself and dump the trash. No sense putting up with it. You will be happier in a new car that actually works. If you are going to have to pay for a new car get one you can be happy driving. Don't put it off or you will just loose more trade in value. This problem doesn't go away after break in. I tried it. Over time it will bet worse and it is already terrible. I love our new Rogue but just about any car out there beats the oil sucking Subaru. Find something you won't regret sending in a payment for every month.

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We have the same issue with our 2015 Forester. Low oil level alerts every 2500 miles. We bought this vehicle based on the Consumer Reports review as the ' best small SUV of the year!' Our dealer did an oil consumption test and said the consumption was only 3 oz for 14 00 miles. But the dealership had overfilled the engine about 2 cm over the upper hole on the dipstick! So, don't trust your dealer either!

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My dealer did the same thing on the very first oil change. When I took it back in they offered me $100 off the next service visit but at that point I had not yet seen the oil consumption problem. The only reason I found the car was over full was because the entire engine compartment had been sprayed with oil to the point we could smell it. That is when I noticed it was too full. I was really mad. Later finding out about the oil consumption tells me that you should trust NO Subaru dealer. The problem is the cars engine engineering. Get out while you can do it as cheaply as possible. That would be NOW! Tell all your friends and anyone you don't want to see hurt so they don't make the same mistake. Subaru can fix the problem. Swapping engines with the same engineering is not a solution. Piston rings.... maybe but I am not convinced. The fact that dealerships are overfilling and Subaru has not done a recall are all you really need to know about this problem. You are on you own. Save yourself and dump the Subaru.

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Yes. Be VERY careful with your dealings with Subaru. Document everything. I am in northern Ontario. The first dealer didn't document my complaint with the first oil change at 10,000. My oil light came on at 5000km. I didn't check how much oil they put in, I am not used to dealing with such a horrible company. I didn't have trouble from 10,000 to 20,000km because I suspect they over-filled it but have no proof because I didn't check. I have gone to two dealers, they have both treated me like I am over reacting and irrational. I assure you I am not, cool calm and collected. The second dealer said my car wasn't using oil, it was just that 'the oil light came on prematurely'. RIGHT. Had the oil done at 32514km light came on after 4615km. I called Subaru again got horrible customer service and told that I had to take my car in immediately. Northern Ontario that is 2.5 hours away. I have since decided to conduct my own test before I go in. I added one Litre. It was halfway up the dipstick so when it goes again I will know how many litres I am using per KMs approximately. I also called Subaru Canada who couldn't find my VIN number on file. I was told to talk to the manager at the dealership, then the owner and then if that didn't work to call Subaru back. My next call however will be to a lawyer and then the media. I could sell and I may if I can't get a resolution but I won't go quietly that is for sure. Oh and the other day my car wouldn't lock, even when I used the door switch. I miss Toyota.

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MY 2015 FORESTER IS A NIGHTMARE!!! This past weekend 6/13/15 I brought my car in for a routine oil change. My car had no issues prior and the odemeter has 11k so I've only preformed one other oil change at a Subaru dealership.Of course they up-sold me to the 12k tune up for $120—seems very steep for an oil change, cabin filter, and tire rotation. Long story short I left the dealership and 20 minutes later had catastrophic engine failure. I had traded in my 08 Legacy GT for the Forester which I had assumed would be a "safer" and more dependable vehicle. My car instantly dropped to below 10 miles an hour and sounded terrible. If this had happened on the highway I could have been in a serious accident. Neither my check engine light or check oil light never came on. One would think engine failure should engage the check engine light. I immediately checked the oil assuming it would be dry, however there was oil in my car and the filter seemed secure and there were no visible leaks. The dealership told me not to worry it was all a big coincidence and that randomly a bearing had come loose and shredded my engine. It was covered under warranty since the car is only 6.5 months old. This concerned me and I told them I wanted to get some advice before they did anything and I would call them back that afternoon. He informed me if I don't let them do the service he will charge me a lot fee and I'd immediately have to return my loaner or I'd be charged for that as well. My next conversation with the dealership was later that day. They told me they had to remove my engine because Subaru corprate needs to see it for warrenty validation. Frustrated beyond belief I called all the appropiate agencies and Subaru's corporate headquarters (2 calls 3 days no response). After that I called a accident inspection service that conducts many of the state of Maine's insurance investigations and damage assessments. They told me that this would absolutly depreciate the value of my car AT LEAST $2,500. Not to mention it will show up on service records, and who's going to buy a car that's basically been totaled before it's a year old. I'm still waiting for an answer from Subaru Corporate as I write this. I am promiosed a response by the end of the day. A word of advice, if you are buying a Forester because it will give you a sense of security knowing your family is in a safe dependable vehicle you may be disapointed by their newer vehicles.

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Be aware that I was reading on a few Subaru owner forums that the dealer maintenance department has been instructed to overfill the oil by 1 quart to mask the oil consumption issue. Also the oil change interval has been dropped to 6k from 7.5k for 2015 models, which if it burns through 2 quarts the light may not come on between oil changes at the dealer. This I found out after I bought a 2015 cross trek and at 600 miles looked at the level in my garage after it sat overnight and the temp was about 50 degrees. The oil level was way over the top full level hole so I used an oil extractor(warmed the engine up) through the dipstick and took out 1.25 extra quart of oil to the top of the dipstick full hole. At nearly 2k on it the oil level has held, I'm hopeful but will keep and eye on it. when I go in for my 6k service I have it documented and will tell the service manager to record it and NOT to overfill the oil and we'll see how it goes. Like the cross trek but may have not bought one if I knew about this beforehand. Paul

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I'm supposed to pick up my newly purchased 2015 Forester Limited later today. Like many of you I stumbled across this thread AFTER I read all of the safety accolades and other good reviews of the Forester. I tend to drive my vehicles for a long time(current vehicle is a 14 yr. old Isuzu Rodeo, another vehicle that HAD and oil consumption issue that was, more-or-less, "cured" by switching to high mileage synthetic oil). Now I'm torn and a little sick-to-my-stomach wondering what I might be getting into. DO I pick up the new car, the most expensive I've ever purchased, or lose my down payment and walk on by?

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Aggie...I hope your new car doesn't have the same problems we are having. I personally think that Subaru doesn't deserve your business, from the horrible experience I have had. Truth is I love driving my car but I know the oil issues are going to cause problems down the road. I am trading mine in. I am also like you...did my research, keep my cars for a long time, feel completely bamboozled by the company. On the upside, you found out before you pick up your car so at least you will know about the sneakiness of what they do. If you have trouble check your oil levels after they work on your car and don't believe a word they say.

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Agree! Agree. We have a 2015 LTD bought in Nov 2014 with oil consumption of about 2000 miles/ 1 QT. If you have not picked up the vehicle yet, please think again before you do. Once you drive it out of the lot, it is your problem!! It is a great vehicle with all the great safety featuresand great ride, but the oil consumption could haunt you for ever. Also, if you do decide to buy it, please check the oil level BEFORE you leave the dealer premises!! They might say it is parked uphill or downhill. Just DO NOT fall for their argument. If parked uphill, it should register a lower level, and vice versa. I have reported this to Consumer Reports to re-review this vehicle..

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I haven't written to this forum for quite a while, but I have been following it. I completely agree with rchsts. Beware! There is something really fishy going on in that Subaru keeps getting accolades for its recent products despite what seems to be a multitude of angry customers. We had a 2011 (first year of the FB25 engine) Forester. At about 8000 miles, the car started to have what was called (by Subaru) the "sewing machine noise" in the engine. It was a circus to get fixed. The dealer never did get it right. My wife loves the Forester concept, and we decided to give them another chance. Subaru gave us a great deal on trading in the '11 and we got a '13 (Forester again). About 15,000 miles later, oil usage in the '13, during highway driving, went way up - a quart per 900 - 1100 miles. Attempts to get this fact across to customer service went nowhere. We were basically going to have to "invent" a bunch of highway-speed driving to satisfy their oil consumption tests to say that the vehicle was indeed defective. In other words, Subaru would look at the vehicle as being just fine as long as the miles we racked up were accumulated under about 50 miles per hour - that describes the majority of the car's use. Take a long trip out on the freeway however........... So, we bailed and bought something else. No more Subarus for us. Another fact that is interesting, is that the "guaranteed trade allowance" program that Subaru runs has drastically changed. The value that Subaru attaches to the "clean, low mileage" Subaru you are trading in has dropped a lot over the past two years in comparison to the NADA and Kelley values for the same vehicle. Covering their butt for anticipated repairs on the trade-in vehicle by any chance??

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Just wanted to update the forum that I traded in my 2015 Forester six weeks ago for a 2016 Mazda CX-5. The Forester had 22,000 miles and went for $4,500 less than the original purchase price - and good riddance. I made every effort to be honest and straight forward with the Mazada dealer about all the oil consumption issues including the fact that the engine block was replaced at 15,000 miles. There were no subsequent problems after the 'repair' but I did not want to wait around for any to surface. The Mazda has been a joy and I can recommend to any looking for a Forester alternative. Best of luck to all of you and thanks for sharing your expierences and knowledge.

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Ok everyone, I have finally racked up almost 6000 miles on my new Subi Forester. I DID swap out the factory oil for regular oil during to break in period for 1500 miles. I then put the factory oil back in. And so far the oil level has dropped about 2/3 down the dipstick in 4000 miles. The car now has 5500 miles and will be going in for its first oil change. While I'm not thrilled that it used any oil in a new engine, I guess it's acceptable by Subaru engine standards. Thanks for the tip on the Mazda. We LOVE this car and hate the thought of losing it. Time will tell and I will continue to post updates.

My 2014 Forester has same problem - oil consumption. it started with 17,000+ miles; now the meter shows 28,000 miles and it happened 4 times already. I have to put a quart engine oil in my trunk all the time...

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I've been following this discussion board every since I bought my 2015 Forester. I was especially worried because I bought it used with 10K miles and it made me wonder why it was traded in. The deadler said that the owner wanted to trade up to a truck to tow heavier loads for work, but you never know. So far, after 4K miles, I have not seen any oil consumption. I also checked to make sure the oil wasn't overfilled when they dealer took the trade-in (my new car). I also read that the affected cars of this oil consumption problem are 5% of the cars. I hope that I won on the odds and I'm part of the 95% percent. If not, I hope if anything goes wrong, it goes wrong before the warranty is up. Are there any other people on here that have had no problems like me? Do you think I might see this problem as I get more mileage?

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By the way, I have a manual transmission which has been doing great. I love my Subie so far.

more info FYI: for my car, the problem always happen during long distance hwy driving (55 ~75 m/h). looks the higher engine RPM will make it happen more frequently.

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Hmm, higher rpms make this happen faster, another good reason not to have the manual transmission, which, by the way, is not that great anyway. I've got a good friend with nothing but repeated clutch problems. Finally got resolved an independent mechanic. Generally speaking, people with manual transmissions love to race the engine. My advice is stick to the automatic, it's a CVT and much better on fuel as well.

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I really think the transmission is personal preference. I sacrifice a couple MPG for the ability to accelerate fast from stop lights and downshift on the highway to my liking. I rarely ever go past 3000 RPM. Also, I live in Colorado and plan to tow things with my hitch and towing up and down hills tears up an automatic transmissions faster because of the heat generated. My car is still pretty new at 14K miles, so I'll keep you posted if I have any issues with my clutch and oil consumption in the future.

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I still average 31-33 MPG on the highway, which is my normal commute to/from work, which is above the estimates. Short trips with fast acceleration are much lower though. I get around 27.3 MPG city, but stop and go traffic can take me down to around 20. Overall, I'm very happy with this compared to my old gas guzzler which got 15 MPG.

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Don't worry about preferring a manual transmission Alex. I do too. And I don't feel the need to justify it to Mark who thinks we should all drive automatics....

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Recent August 2015 issue of Consumer Reports has a write up on 'oil crisis' pages 61-63. Subaru is one of the vehicles mentioned. Gives tips on how to approach dealers or the Automakers with this issue. I was one of those who complained to CR with a complaint ID #. I wish they did their research and published on their April Issue of 2015 Autos.

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We have a 2013 Subaru Outback and love it!!! It does use a bit of oil between oil changes. Has anyone looked at the weight? It's 0W-20. The oil is like water. It's no wonder it burns oil. I have asked if I could change the weight of the oil, but the dealership says no. They told me that the manufacturer requires this thin oil, so I'm assuming it is due to the boxer engine. I am on the highway a lot and get between 28 to 30 MPG. I typically use 1/2 quart to 1 quart between oil changes. Don't particularly like this aspect, but otherwise we love our Subaru.

1 out of 1 people think this is helpful.
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I have a 2013 Impreza with oil consumption issues among other things. The new models are still have this issue I would not recommend anyone buying one. The piston rings are defective, Subaru has a TSB out acknowledging this problem. There is no break in period & its not normal and don't let them tell it is! There wont be any longevity with these engines. Contact the website link at the bottom and look up your state lemon law. I am currently going through this arbitration process myself. New engine replacements will not solve this problem. You could be losing out on thousands of dollars. http://www.lemonlaw.com

1 out of 1 people think this is helpful.
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I have a 2014 Forester , which showed oil warning light at 21000 miles when the oil and filter was replaced at 18,950miles.The dipstick did show oil at the lower mark. I added a quart of oil ,and continued driving. Called dealer, said it was normal and to bring it back for a oil consumption test if the problem recurs

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Check the oil level before you leave the dealer' s lot to assure the engine is not overfilled!!I,

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Ok folks, here is the dealio: Subaru has acknowledged an issue with the oil rings for the FB series engines. Especially on the Legacy and Outback (and others, like the Forester) with FB20 and FB25 series engines. Prior to May 2013 Legacy's and Outbacks with the 4 cylinder engine are known to have bad oil control rings, and this affects other models as well. There is also an issue with the dip sticks in these engines where when the proper amount of oil is placed in the engine, the dipstick will read above the full mark. As such, when a dealer conducts an Oil Consumption Test, the engine will appear to read as still full of oil at 1200 miles (unless you are burning oil at an insane rate). The only way for them to do the test properly is to put in 4.5QTs of oil (FB25 engine), start the car, run it for 5 minutes to saturate the oil filter, turn off the car, and let it sit for 1 hour. After letting it sit, they should then top it off to the full mark on the dipstick, and note the exact location on the Oil Consumption Test TSB document they will send to Subaru. The biggest issue with finding out how much oil your Subaru is burning is that lack of the dealer taking time to figure out the proper procedure for filling it for the purposes of the test. Subaru is very clear about the procedure and most dealers don't have their top line mechanics changing the oil.

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I have a 2015 Forester base model, MT. I was worried about this at first, too, because I had to add another quart twice in the first 4,000 miles. I've got just under 7k now and haven't seen a drop in the oil in the last 3k. Here are the conditions during the times I had to top off: 1) Car only had 300-ish miles on it when I bought it so it was definitely in the break-in period. 2) Both low oil warnings were after long (500+ mile) highway drives, in which I was doing 85 a lot of the way and staying around 3000 rpm. 3)Both times were during the winter, in which we got a lot of snow and ice, so I was engine-braking more than usual on a regular basis. 4) I'd only learned to drive manual 2 or 3 months before getting the car, so I know I revved the engine more than necessary those first couple thousand miles. Other than that, I've had no issues with the car and still love it!

1 out of 1 people think this is helpful.
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I have a difficult time believing that any different kind of driving is responsible for the oil consumption. But hey....I just traded mine in on Friday and got something different because I didn't need the stress. Good luck to you all...I hope it gets sorted out.

2 out of 2 people think this is helpful.

the statement: 1 quart per 1000 miles is normal is unacceptable. I"m wondering if Lemon law has items to define how to handle such "quantitative" situation. anybody has successfully protected his/her property through the lemon law here?

BoholMark mentioned class action lawsuit: there is actually: http://www.chimicles.com/subaru-oil-consumption-class- action-lawsuit

Automatic engine, 2011. Sucks oil like crazy. Bringing it in to Subaru dealer (where we bought it and where it is serviced) tomorrow. Interested to see what they'll tell me!

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Our 2015 has now had its short block replaced. I have about 1500 miles on the new short block, and we seem to be down several quarts of oil already. It is not looking promising. We will see if this is an 'engine break-in' issue or if we are going to experience the same issue with the new short block that we did with the original. That one obviously failed the oil consumption test. If it doesn't improve after the first oil change at 3000 miles, it is being traded.

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I have a 2012 Subaru Impreza, currently on my third short block in this car, which is still burning oil like a monster(1 litre every 1500km) Im out of my warranty(100,000km), but there is a 20,000km service warranty which is given on any service work, which I also just ran out of. I was able to document with Subaru my oil burning condition before the service warranty ran out so hopefully they are true to their word and will still help find a solution for my never ending oil consumption problem. I know people say to sell it, but its the only car that has everything I was looking for (AWD, manual, lots of space, good on gas) Also, it would be hard for me to sell this oil burner to someone else, leaving them with costly repairs down the road. Right now I hope Subaru can do something better then just a short block change because the first 2 didnt do anything. The "revised" shortblock as they called it was supposed to fix the problem, but its been the worst out of the 3 ive had in the car!

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@gregorz4. Contact lemonlaw.com. As long as you have the problem documented prior to the warranty expiring and you have had 3 engine replacements you certainly do have a claim. They can help you. You would be losing out on thousands by not contacting them. I am going through this process now on my 2013.

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I wish I could but in Canada there really isnt a lemon law. Something similar, but nothing that will end up with me having my car replaced. Im hoping for a full engine replacement, if not that then some kind of trade in deal, but i doubt they would want this POS that chugs oil.

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My 2015 Subaru (naturally aspirated) uses More than a quart every 1000 miles starting at 5,000 miles. Prior to that it used some but I thought that was due to the break in period. This is my second Subaru and my old Forester with 200,000 miles does not use oil like this.

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I bought a Subaru Forester in June 2014 and I have been at the dealer more than I ever was with my 2006 Hyundai Elantra that had 267,000 miles on it. The only thing I ever had to replace or change on it was the oil, tires, alternator and brakes. Everything else was original until the original timing belt went on it causing me to purchase a new car. I wanted and SUV and did research on many different makes. I chose Subaru because of their "wonderful" reputation, the style of the Forester and the gas mileage. But since June I have had continuous problems with oil consumption, a pinging under 2500 RPM's and now I notice the smell of antifreeze after I park. Going back again to the dealer today for the oil issue because for the FIRST time it came on TWICE in between oil changes. SYNTHETIC OIL is a JOKE!! And if Subaru doesn't do right by me they will see how powerful one person can be through social media and websites such as this. I am going to create a facebook page this evening called Good Business/Bad Business and I want all of you with your problems with 2015 Subaru models and oil consumption to please share there as well. TOGETHER we can beat these big corporations and get back CUSTOMER SERVICE which seems have faded away from our money hungry businesses.

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I just a story on 9 news in Denver about this. Newer subies, beamers, Audis, Toyotas, Hondas and others are having this issue. I think it's the low energy thin oil, among other things.

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bought my son a 14 impreza manual transmission. 15000 miles. Having oil light problems. 1st time consumption test "normal" Second time light came on we were told faulty sensor for low oil (replaced). We are on our 3rd attempt (consumption test) when I brought it in was told it was down only 1/2 quart..I advised that we had added a quart and 1/2 so as not to damage engine. When I checked oil at beginning of consumption test it was over-filled...called tech and asked about test and he said they mark it on their internal paperwork...I asked what it showed...He advised that it is marked "just above" the full mark. REAL SCIENTIFIC Bought new Subaru thinking good safe reliable car for my son to go to college with...WHOOPS...Need further documentation then just going to give to lawyer....This is not right...Why does class action stop at 13 Impreza;s ????

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I am thinking of a bumper sticker ' 2015 Oil Guzzler' on my Forester!

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@14unimpreza 2014 & 2015 Subaru's have been added to 1 of the class action suits that I had seen. Lemon Law is the way to go. It's a faster turn around & there is no legal fees on the consumer's end. I am currently waiting on my settlement to be finalized. This oil problem goes back to 2011, even some later models and Subaru continues making engine's with defective piston rings. Guess they just didn't get it yet.

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Per a Subaru dealer the correct procedure for checking oil level is to park the car on a level surface, shut off the engine and wait exactly 5 minutes before checking the oil level. Checking it cold will show a false high level which means my 2015 car is in worse shape than I though originally.

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I started my facebook page Good Business Bad Business so please share Subaru oil consumption stories there as well. I took my car in yesterday as the oil light came on for the first time TWICE in between oil changes. They basically minimized my problem and told me to call Subaru of America. They also handed me a list of reasons why my car may be using oil. RIDICULOUS basically anytime you take your car out of your driveway it's going to use oil according to their list which I already knew. LMAO they think the consumer is stupid. The saddest part is while I was there another customer came in to pick up her car an Impreza and guess why it was there?? YES!!! Oil consumption problems. I told her in front of all the employees to do some research and gave her this website address. They told me that the 2012-2014 Subarus were having oil issues and they upgraded the pistons so they can't replace anything. I can only call Subaru of America. Well I will be doing that today and I swear people if they don't do something I will make it my goal until the day I leave this world to put a dent in their car business. I will make every effort to change their logo from LOVE Subaru to HATE Subaru. They are screwing their customers and if they don't take care of this problem they don't deserve to have a wonderful reputation and be making astronomical amounts of money. If we pull together we can make changes happen, I know we can!!

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I found an article from Consumer Reports written June 30, 2015 Google it and check it out it is well worth the read. They state that auto makers for Audi, BMW and Subaru claim the oil consumption is "normal" that is exactly what I was told, but CR says do not be fooled it's not normal.

I also was given a ridiculous list of reasons my car was using oil. I gave them the bullet list back with my comments, here it is; Your bullet points with their relevance to my wife’s driving situation. • When the engine is new and within the break-in period (during the first 1000 miles of operation) The engine has over 10,000 on it • When the engine oil being used is of lower quality (other than “Energy or Resource Conserving” API Classification SM or SN or ILSAC, look for the starburst design with GF-4 or GF-5) It is the oil you put in it • When the incorrect oil viscosity is used (viscosity other than 0W-20 in the case of these specific vehicles) Once again, it is the oil you put in it. I had to add 5w-30 to keep from running it low. Does this need drained and refiled to get the oil back into specification and prevent voiding any warrantee? Please respond with instructions. • When engine braking is employed (Downshifting to make use of the transmission’s gear ranges and the engine to decelerate the vehicle) Our car is a CVT and does not have paddle shifters and my wife doesn’t drive that way anyway. • When the engine is operated at high engine speeds (Continually or under frequent and repetitive hard acceleration such as frequent freeway merging) The speed limit between my wife and her work never exceeds 55 mph and is 45 mph over 80% of the distance. We do the speed limit on the highways. • When the engine is operated under heavy loads (Frequent carrying of cargo, multiple passengers or trailer towing) The car has never been “fully” loaded with people and cargo however when we purchased the vehicle we felt quite confident that it should be capable of having people in all the seats and we should be able to use the available cargo space to it’s fullest. Why would we not??? Most driving is just the two of us with an occasional grandchild in the back. • When the engine idles for long periods of time (Frequent use of a remote engine start system followed by some period of idling as an example) We don’t have remote start and don’t like paying for the gas that moves us down the road so we don’t waste it sitting still. Besides, who makes a car the blows oil just for idling? • When the vehicle is operated in stop and go and/or heavy traffic situations Traffic between Westfield and Noblesville (on 146th st) is stop and go only on the rare occasion of a wreck. • When the vehicle is used under severe temperature conditions (Cold or hot) Without a definition of severe this is nothing but a catch all. My Chevy’s, Fords, Oldsmobiles, Hondas and Acura never had the slightest problems with this. The question is why would a Subaru? • When the vehicle accelerates and decelerates frequently Another catch all statement without a definition of “frequent”. • Frequent short trip driving where the engine may not reach full operating temperature Here we go again, a catch all… Nobody intentionally buys a brand new car that will blow out OVER a quart of oil between oil changes and require topping off. NOBODY! This is an unacceptable situation by anyones standards. What should I to expect at 20,000, 50,000 or 100,000 miles? Will I be at a full 5 quarts added between changes at 50,000 miles? Considering normal wear on moving parts and the lesson learned in the first 12,000 miles it could exceed that. I am a reasonable man with a warrantee that is not yet near its limit. I will monitor this situation through the next oil change and if it improves in weather that is not sub zero like we have had (the only condition above that might actually apply to our situation) I will withdraw my demand for immediate corrective action. However I think you and I both know that will not be the case. There is something wrong with this car and I will eventually need it fixed. I will be printing and filing all of our communications on this issue. Please don’t forget to respond to my question on bullet point #3 above as it pertains to proper maintenance moving forward and the addition of non specification oil in my crank case.

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The first oil change the dealership did on my car was an overfill so significant as to blow oil all over the inside of the engine compartment. These dealers are really trying to keep this problem under wraps. I think we should be shouting it to the whole town. Other consumers should be warned not to buy Subaru.

3 out of 3 people think this is helpful.
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Here are a couple of things to consider. The government demands ever higher mileage from cars which has led to manufacturers being forced to use low tension oil control rings (low friction) and oil that is as thin as water (0-20W) oil. These things lead to increased oil consumption that would not be acceptable in a 20 year old car with 200,000 miles on it. The end result is cars that supposedly save oil that burn oil instead. Pressure needs to be applied to the government to BACK OFF. Yes manufacturers have a responsibility to make cars with acceptable oil consumption but unless something changes oil burners are going to become the new normal. This is NOT progress.

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Here is another thing to consider. You do not have to use 0-20W oil in your car! You do need to use synthetic and of the quality that Subaru specifies but the weight can be different such as 5-20 or 5-30. Check your manual for the oil quality standard (SN I believe) and if you want, check with the dealer and specifically ask them about this issue and your warranty. From the research I have done this is not a warranty issue but to comply with the government mileage test which is starts with a cold engine. Zero weight oil helps in the first few seconds of the test but afterwards does NOTHING towards mileage. The difference is essentially impossible to tell for the average car owner. I doubt this will solve oil consumption problems but it might very well help some.

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This might help. http://www.pqiamerica.com/apiserviceclass.htm

2014 Subaru Forester Problem History * 25-26k miles - fuse that controls the fuel pressure pump on the front driver side under the hood burned out - car die -husband replaced it * 32-33k miles downhill mountain - fuse burned out again. Replaced but it didn't work. Took to Chico, refreshed the ECU, worked (overnight work), test drove and die on the way back. Chico Subaru had to call the Subaru manufacture and was told to replace the fuel pressure pump regulator. * 56k miles - fuse burned out again. Replaced and the car worked again. * 63k miles 8/7/15 Freeway 99 - fuse burned out again. No fuse. Towed 92 miles. Replaced and the car worked again. * 64K miles (8/15/15) Freeway 60 - fuse burned out again. Replaced the fuse and was able to run less than a mile and the car didn't work anymore. Note: Probably put about 250 miles on the car before it die again from 8/7/15. AV SUBARU LANCASTER - David (Service manager) 43243 10th St W Lancaster, CA 93534 661-949-1535 SUBARU MANUFACTURE - 1-800-782-2783 Date towed: 8/15/15 by BOBS TOWING - 626-965-2407 Tracking Progress 8/17/15 10:50am Contacted service (David ----Service Manager) on 8/17/15 - he will look at the car on 8/18/15 to see what's wrong and call me back. 8/24/15 2pm Picked up car from AV Subaru Lancaster. Advised to not touch anything and have the car towed to Subaru dealership for diagnosis. 8/26/15 8pm Went to Lithia Subaru to determine what the value is for the Forester. Came back home and the car die about ½ mile from home. Pushed car to driveway. * Note: Probably put about the same 250 miles on the car before it die again, after we just got the car back from AV Subaru Lancaster on 8/24/15. 8/27/15 933am, 1030am & 145pm Contacted Subaru America to inform Andrew that the car die again after we just picked up the car from AV Subaru Lancaster. Left 3 messages as he is out sick. Subaru America staff recommended to have car taken to the dealer again for diagnosis then Subaru will see what they can do to help out, since it is out of the 60,000 warranty but it was an ongoing problem from when it was still under warranty.

My 2014 Forester XT died 6 times for the same issue and the dealer cannot diagnose what is wrong. See my experiences, frustrations with this car. I lost lots of money for towing, taxi and car rental, and wasted my time. I have included links to Youtube for when the car die so you can see it for yourself. Yeah, that is the 2014 Forester XT, when I think it is reliable. https://www.youtube.com/watch? v=t3hlRAz30Lghttps://www.youtube.com/watch? v=DUU7ZMGut7ohttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IBJ3teu- P5Ahttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WFsaDItn- X4https://www.youtube.com/watch? v=P7gkfI2MuMAhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZA7yo2JI2RI

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I own a 2013 Sub Legacy. I did own a 2012 Sub Forester which used as much as a quart between oil changes (at 5k interval). That was too much for me and I traded it. My wife's 2013 is now using a little and the oil light comes on at around 4k oil change interval and goes back off after changing oil until 4k. I don't like that one bit. That oil light is supposed to be something that only comes on when things are really bad (i.e. low oil.). The Legacy does use about a half a quarts in a 4k oil change intervals which is still too much for a car with 30k miles. She drives it very easy if I drove it I bet it would be about a quart burned between changes. What you are all missing is the fact that rings ARE a wear item and this problem, even if tolerable now, is only going to get worse. I'm trading my wifes car within the week. Beware of all subies after 2011. I'm very disappointed I liked both cars very much. But oil use was pounded into me at an early age as a sign a car has not been maintained. Who wants to be adding oil in 0 temps?

1 out of 1 people think this is helpful.
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A quart in 5,000 miles is actually quite good. A quart in 4,000 miles is not bad really. You are right about oil consumption possibly going up as the car gets more miles on it but you could go another 100,000 with little to no increase in oil use.

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A quart between oil changes is great for a car with 150k miles. Not for a new car. I now have a Mitsubishi Outlander and love it. Guess how much oil it uses.... not a drop.

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I have a 2015 Forester and it has been having oil consumption problems since the first 3000 miles. New cars should NOT being using this much oil and if they are you need to keep records and continue to go to your dealer and demand something be done. After my service manager contacted his district manager, and the district manager told him there was nothing they were going to do, I contacted Subaru of America. I dealt with a representative named Olivia and she was absolutely amazing. She took all my information, told me when she would contact me again and called every time she said she was going to even if she didn't have updated information. You DO NOT find customer service like this too many places these days. After about three weeks she contacted me to let me know the short block has been ordered and is going to be replaced. I should be hearing from my dealer this week to schedule an appointment. OIL CONSUMPTION IS NOT ACCEPTABLE IN BRAND NEW CARS!!! It's not only Subaru either there are problems with Lexus and other makes. I personally think it's the crap synthetic oil they are saying it needs to use the crap is like water!! No matter what keep records, keep annoying your dealerships and after three or four visits with the same issue contact Subaru of America!

1 out of 1 people think this is helpful.
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More likely the low tension piston rings are to blame rather than the oil. The lubricating quality of an oil can not be assessed by the weight or grade of the oil. Internal engine clearances, oil pump volume and other things determine what oil viscosity an engine should use. Subaru screwed up and either used rings unsuitable for the engine or the cylinder surface is incompatible for the rings. I certainly would avoid any new Subaru until this problem is fixed.

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I sent that consumer reports link to several people who I know were thinking about a Subaru. I would urge you to do the same. The only think they will respond to is a massive reduction in sales due to the issue and then they will have to do something about it. I personally believe that seeing a TON of new Subarus on the road now this is going to blow back on them badly when it hits mainstream media like dateline. I went from being their biggest fan to a "Stay away from Subaru" Zealot.

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Misty - there is no reason why your dealer should stonewall you as they make money on the repairs. I finally got a new short block in mine since the oil consumption test showed more than a 1/3 quart use in 1,200 miles which is the standard. If you have a oil consummation test performed by the dealer be sure and get a copy of the form they use which spells it all out. If your car fails the test then all the dealer has to do is contact Subaru for authorization to do the repair, order the parts and install them. This process should take less than a month.

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Not all Subaru cars are affected and there's other manufacturers with oil burning issues, but, it's a small percentage of the cars sold. It's unfortunate, however, as "full of regrets" points out above there's a remedy for this and others as well have had their engines replaced. I'd like to remind all of you who seem to be down on Subaru, that they have sold more cars and have enjoyed an upward trajectory in sales every year resulting in a very robust resale value market for their cars and 95 percent of all their cars are still on the road and easily pass 200,000 miles. The Subaru high mileage club has members who have logged as many as 500,000 miles. There's a technical service bulletin for the oil burning issue and Subaru of America Customer Service is available for you to contact at 800- 782-2783. Call them if you are not getting satisfaction from your local dealership. And, finally, here's a link worth reading, http://bigstory.ap.org/article/6d6cf8188f7748ffbb34db71e33f7271 /consumer-reports-finds-some-newer-cars-burn-too-much-oil

Markw1952, with all due respect, I don't think anyone here on this thread cares about what someone elses experience is with a "good" subaru. Does anyone care how well Subaru's sales are when they can't keep oil in their engines? Subaru made lots of engines that didn't use the 0W-20 oil and I am quite certain that there are many such engines out there. The fact is, there are thousands of these oil burners out there now and this thread is full of them. I dumped my Subaru with less than 20,000 miles and got a Nissan Rogue. Love the Rogue. NO OIL CONSUMPTION ISSUES. Great car, better ride, better interior, better mileage.... Dump the Subaru before it drives up your blood pressure and get something you will be happy with. Nissan, Honda, Toyota, Chevy, Ford.... anything but another Subaru. Do it before the world gets wind of these issues and your resale value takes a dive. Hey Markw1952, do you work for Subaru as an employee or a contractor?

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@bobdavis73 >>>> Well said!

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Let me make something perfectly clear, I don't work for Subaru. This was posted online "Only Subaru with manual-transmission have the excessive oil-consumption. Anyway Subaru is a very reliable automobile brand. Most main important components last when the engine exceed 200,000 miles. I don't know why American's main issue with cars are their electronic system and the body integrity; who cared about those things. The only thing you should care about is the major system that make the car run and operate" see this link, http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2015/06/excessiv e-oil-consumption/index.htm Also, see this link below, http://www.torquenews.com/1084/why- these-two-subarus-are-most-likely-go-200000-miles Finally, Subaru has established a procedure for determining if your car is part of the problem vehicles and establish whether your car is part of the sample group in the two percent of vehicles. If you fail to establish a case, and prove by doing the oil consumption test, then, you're likely not to be successful. In every case, where the person got their engines replaced, they reported that they did the test. Check out the last one reporting this on four days ago by "full of regrets ", who got a new short block. Subaru sold more than 200,000 cars last year, a 15 percent increase in sales over 2014, those are facts. There's no way that all of those cars are affected. And, here's an article recently, http://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2015-06-08/subaru- sells-out-will-one-of-the-fastest-growing-carmakers-decide-to-stay- small- So, I ask you, do you think all of these increased sales are accidents?

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Just one further clarification, in the above quotation, it says that only "manual transmissions " are affected. I didn't write this, it's a quote written on the article I referred to. I've heard that some automatic transmission vehicles have also been affected, but, I've heard that the manual transmissions are proportionally more involved.

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Unfortunately, there's more Forester cars affected by this, and you have to prove by doing the oil consumption test that your car actually has the problem, they're not going to just take your word for it. So, forget just calling up the dealer and telling them that you want a new engine. That's not going to work. And, the class action lawsuit is not over, it's possible that it will not be successful, so, your best bet is to do the oil consumption test and prove your own case. Other people have done it, so, it does work.

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After completing several oil consumption tests (we had to start over more than once due to misplaced paperwork/documentation on dealer end, or my going over the mileage limit between oil checks) I was approved for a new short block, which was installed about 3000 miles ago. My 2015 Forester is a manual, and I was informed by the dealership that the problem is much more common in manual transmissions vs. automatics. That being said, I decided to do the short block repair and give it a chance before trading it in for another brand of vehicle because I have always liked my Subarus and I like a manual transmission. I have just had my first oil change after 3500 miles on the new short block and the issue seems to be better. On the original short block, I had to add oil several times in the first 3000 mile break in period as the check oil light kept coming on. The new short block made it to the scheduled oil change without issue. While the oil level did drop down, it didn't drop precipitously as it did w/the original engine. We didn't document the oil usage on the new block during the break in period as I was told we should wait until after the first 3000 miles so now we are keeping an eye on it and hoping that this fix will resolve the issue to our satisfaction. I intend to document the oil usage going forward so that there aren't any warranty coverage problems if the issue resurfaces. I also made sure that the oil was at the fill line and not overfilled when leaving the dealership as I have heard numerous stories of overfilled oil tanks (which of course will not give an accurate picture of oil consumption when testing.) Finally, dealership told me that before December of 2014, the replacement short blocks still had the same issue. According to my dealer anything replaced after that should resolve the issue. Let's hope.

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DBTJ- thank you for your answer and sharing your story here, it's helpful to others going through this process. OK, the dealer lost the paperwork, that's unfortunate, and I would merely say that I'd probably find another dealer in my area that would be desirable, if there are alternatives, sometimes that's not the case. Good for you that you kept the documentation. And, it's great that your new short block is definitely working better. Sure, engines need to break in, entirely reasonable. There's lots of other cars as pointed out in Consumers Reports in their report of "THE THIRSTY 30". What are the other manufacturers doing on this list, at least Subaru is addressing the issue. Look, the people doing the class action lawsuit just don't want to do the work you've done and are looking for a lightening rod fix to their problems and get their engines replaced. I'm sorry, but, I don't see that happening and here's why. It means that Subaru might be at risk for replacement of every engine they sold and this is just not a reasonable solution, it's just too much. They're very savvy and clever to address the individual cases and have established this oil consumption test, that's probably going to be the point that's going to reduce the chance of the lawsuit being successful. Finally, thanks for validating and confirming that the dealership told you that the vast majority of these oil burning issues are with manual-transmission cars. You know, you can't purchase a new Subaru Outback in the USA with a manual transmission. Automatic transmissions have just gotten better over the years and I can tell you that the CVT transmission in the Subaru is excellent. I have a couple of friends with Subaru Forester models and one of them has the 2011 model with the FB series engine. They have the automatic transmission in the 2011 and have no problems at all. So, it's definitely not every car. And, for all of you Subaru "haters " out there and you know who you are, some of you incredibly who don't even OWN a Subaru, follow the instructions if you have a problem with the oil consumption and make your own case for a replacement. Don't give up. Others have done it and you can too. Good luck.

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Somebody please ban this Mark1922 subaru cheerleader. Are you actually questioning whether some of the posters actually even own a subaru, like we come to this forum to make up stories. Stop talking about Subaru like they're "handling" this situation well. Just about everyone I know with the problem faces the same red tape, repeated "tests", no action unless you suggest a lawsuit. Subaru have basically lawyered up and it's quite clear that they have serious manufacturing defects that have impacted a very high number of vehicles. So far, Mark has suggested that it is quite normal to have to check the oil at every gas fillup, that we shouldn't be critical of Subaru because "stuff happens", and basically stop complaining because Subaru is a great company so we should be satisfied with that rather than unsatisfied with the fact that we were sold DEFECTIVE vehicles. Please go away. Nobody wants to hear your Subaru commercial. Like Bob, I sold my Subaru and figured it cost me about $2000. That's not okay Mark, by anybody's standard. That is what this forum is about, people like me sharing true stories about their vehicle to help validate what others are finding.. We don't need or want the RA-RA-Subaru crap that you keep coming back here to throw in our faces. Be gone.

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wow Mark, a report from Subaru reporting how great Subaru's are. I guess it's settled then, our oil problems don't exist. the trade in program is a rip-off and gives you less than reasonable value on your car to buy another. having that program is NOT indicative of a company that is confident about the quality of their cars. They will turn around, gussy up the trade in and lie to another new sucker about the oil consumption problem to get more profit. You are a certified moron.

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580

ah, a positive report that returns an Oops message. kinda like Subaru's false promises

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580

is there a forum admin for this forum out there? please ban this guy. please. 4000+ posts of subarus spam is enough

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if anyone else is bothered by the Subaru spam I urge you to click the little gear/arrow in the top right of the message and report the message as spam. I would suggest the long posts where he has pasted Subaru marketing materials or where he is posting links to subaru articles, which is legitimate spam. thanks

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Done deal.

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Hey Mark, its about time to trade that 2010 in for a 2015 isn't it? Then lets see if you posts change on this thread. Just curious if your still recommending Subaru to all your friends. I know I was for quite some time. Then I had to warn all of the same friends.

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For clarification, my Forester (2014) was an automatic transmission. I too have warned all my friends. I also posted up on sever blogs that I contribute to. Friends don't let friends buy a Subaru.

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if we can persuade a couple of hundred or a couple of thousand potential Subaru buyers to reconsider, maybe Subaru will learn that in this day and age of social networks, it is better to step up to a problem than lawyer up. Every company makes mistakes, just acknowledge it and become allies to your customers.

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well said Pablo. I was willing to work through the problem until I took the car in for the oil consumption test. When I went to drive the car away I asked one last question to the service writer. I asked "How much consumption of oil will you consider acceptable when I return after 1000 miles"? His response was 8 oz was the acceptable limit. Doing the math in shows this to be over a quart between oil changes. I never returned for the test. I traded the car a week later.

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Someone posted above that manual transmissions burn oil more than autos, according to Subaru. This is because people can drive the manuals more aggressively. What it really means is that Subaru engines are burning oil, and the folks that are more aggressive drivers (e.g. people who buy manual transmissions) will burn more oil in Subarus. Subaru lists the following conditions that will cause your Subaru to burn more oil: "With the extended service intervals commonly used for today’s engines combined with one or more of the conditions listed below, typical engine oil consumption may require adding engine oil in between scheduled maintenance intervals: • When the engine is new and within the break-in period (during the first 1000 miles of operation) • When the engine oil being used is of lower quality (other than “Energy or Resource Conserving” API Engine Oil Classification SM or SN or ILSAC, look for the starburst design with GF-4 or GF-5) • When the incorrect oil viscosity is used (viscosity other than 0W-20 in the case of these specific vehicles) • When engine braking is employed (use of the transmission’s gear ranges to decelerate while using the engine to apply resistance) • When the engine is operated at high engine speeds (continually or under frequent, hard acceleration) • When the engine is operated under heavy loads (frequent carrying of heavy cargo, passengers or trailer towing) • When the engine idles for long periods of time (may be related to frequent use of a remote engine start system) • When the vehicle is operated in stop and go and/or heavy traffic situations • When the vehicle is used under severe temperature conditions (cold or hot) • When the vehicle accelerates and decelerates frequently TSB 02-157-14R Page 3 of 25 Under these or similar operating conditions, the oil level should be checked more frequently. The engine oil and filter may also need to be changed more often. As per the Owner’s Manual, engine oil consumption under these conditions may be as high as 1 quart per 1200 miles." Basically, if you drive your Subaru, it's going to burn oil. The information is from the TSB for the FB Series engine and it's tenancy to burn oil.

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My wife's 2013 CVT legacy, which we both loved, started out with just the oil light flashing on at about 4k miles into an oil change interval. I checked the oil and it was not even half a quart low so I thought I could live with that. Then it started getting a little worse and the light would come on before 4k and would stay on longer. Then I noticed it using a little more oil. This was all within a span of about 8 months and less than 12k miles.The last time it was probably a little over a half a quart low maybe .75qt. low. After that I said that's enough this thing has to go. She now drives a Nissan Rogue. Whoever said it was the 0w - 20 oil, I don't think so or Subaru would have used that as a resolution. My Outlander uses the same weight and I just changed the oil in it at 6,400 miles and it had not used even a noticable amount. I also want to let you know that I already got beat up a little on my trade from what KBB says. Dealer told me that there are a lot of legacy sitting on lots so they factor that into the resale. Beware, you don't want to keep your oil burner too long folks.

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My experience mirrors those of others here. I've had two FB engine Sue-barus that burned a lot of oil. Subaru have a LOT of PR people working online for them.

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Okay, so Mark1952 may well be a Subaru PR guy. It makes sense.

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I'd be surprised if he or she didn't have a shill profile on Nasioc.

I also was given a ridiculous list of reasons my car was using oil. I gave them the bullet list back with my comments, here it is; Your bullet points with their relevance to my wife’s driving situation. • When the engine is new and within the break-in period (during the first 1000 miles of operation) The engine has over 10,000 on it • When the engine oil being used is of lower quality (other than “Energy or Resource Conserving” API Classification SM or SN or ILSAC, look for the starburst design with GF-4 or GF-5) It is the oil you put in it • When the incorrect oil viscosity is used (viscosity other than 0W-20 in the case of these specific vehicles) Once again, it is the oil you put in it. I had to add 5w-30 to keep from running it low. Does this need drained and refiled to get the oil back into specification and prevent voiding any warrantee? Please respond with instructions. • When engine braking is employed (Downshifting to make use of the transmission’s gear ranges and the engine to decelerate the vehicle) Our car is a CVT and does not have paddle shifters and my wife doesn’t drive that way anyway. • When the engine is operated at high engine speeds (Continually or under frequent and repetitive hard acceleration such as frequent freeway merging) The speed limit between my wife and her work never exceeds 55 mph and is 45 mph over 80% of the distance. We do the speed limit on the highways. • When the engine is operated under heavy loads (Frequent carrying of cargo, multiple passengers or trailer towing) The car has never been “fully” loaded with people and cargo however when we purchased the vehicle we felt quite confident that it should be capable of having people in all the seats and we should be able to use the available cargo space to it’s fullest. Why would we not??? Most driving is just the two of us with an occasional grandchild in the back. • When the engine idles for long periods of time (Frequent use of a remote engine start system followed by some period of idling as an example) We don’t have remote start and don’t like paying for the gas that moves us down the road so we don’t waste it sitting still. Besides, who makes a car the blows oil just for idling? • When the vehicle is operated in stop and go and/or heavy traffic situations Traffic between Westfield and Noblesville (on 146th st) is stop and go only on the rare occasion of a wreck. • When the vehicle is used under severe temperature conditions (Cold or hot) Without a definition of severe this is nothing but a catch all. My Chevy’s, Fords, Oldsmobiles, Hondas and Acura never had the slightest problems with this. The question is why would a Subaru? • When the vehicle accelerates and decelerates frequently Another catch all statement without a definition of “frequent”. • Frequent short trip driving where the engine may not reach full operating temperature Here we go again, a catch all… Nobody intentionally buys a brand new car that will blow out OVER a quart of oil between oil changes and require topping off. NOBODY! This is an unacceptable situation by anyones standards. What should I to expect at 20,000, 50,000 or 100,000 miles? Will I be at a full 5 quarts added between changes at 50,000 miles? Considering normal wear on moving parts and the lesson learned in the first 12,000 miles it could exceed that. I am a reasonable man with a warrantee that is not yet near its limit. I will monitor this situation through the next oil change and if it improves in weather that is not sub zero like we have had (the only condition above that might actually apply to our situation) I will withdraw my demand for immediate corrective action. However I think you and I both know that will not be the case. There is something wrong with this car and I will eventually need it fixed. I will be printing and filing all of our communications on this issue. Please don’t forget to respond to my question on bullet point #3 above as it pertains to proper maintenance moving forward and the addition of non specification oil in my crank case.

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Grant at Subaru of America told me that I live in a "severe driving area". I live near Orlando, Fl. Nothing severe. A bit hot at times, but many places are, and weather/temps have no impact on the oil loss.

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Bravo and well said bobdavis73! The "list" is ridiculous. "Gee, sorry kids, you'll have to go with Mom in the other car. I can't load this one up or I'll have to stop and buy oil............". Or how about "crap - it's 92 degrees out; there goes my oil mileage......." I can tell you that our '13 Forester at highway speeds (65 to 75) would blow through the equivalent of about a quart of oil every 1000 miles. And that was Subaru's own 0-20. Not an issue for us any more. After our repair circus with an '11 Forester, we were not about to go the short-block route with the "13. We dumped the Forester and got another brand AWD vehicle. Maybe not the same gas mileage, but THE OIL IS STAYING IN THE ENGINE! Oh, almost forgot - my wife works with a lady who has a '13 Outback with a CVT (not the manual, Markw1952). They are having problems and are doing the oil consumption test.

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I'm glad I went with the 15 forester because it sounds like 11-14s are no good. I think the jury is still out on the 15s but I've had a great experience so far with my manual. I have 16k miles, just fyi.

Alex I sure hope you are correct, however, you have jumped on board with a company that will deliver excuses instead of a remedy for the problems you may encounter. If it were not for the terrible engine I would have loved our Forester. When the dealership told me over a quart of loss between oil changes was acceptable I jumped ship. Oh! One more thing. The dealership was overfilling my crank case so bad that I had oil blown all over the inside of the engine compartment. Be sure to check your oil level if you are having your dealer change it for you. You may not have a problem because they are dumping larger quantities in at the oil change. I wish you the best with the car Alex.

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Bad news Alex.... There are two other questions on Car Gurus concerning oil consumption on the 2015 subaru models. I hope yours is an exception but I wouldn't buy it from you.

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Any owners of 15's or even 14's should go post their experience on subaru's own PR site- Nasioc. Yeah you will get a ton of argument and nasty comments, but its worth it.

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Yeh, Alex if you read my comments I didn't notice much oil consumption until after about 20k so watch it close. Bobs list is a fairly standard list that all car Manuf. will site for oil consumption causes.. however, when they do they are talking about minimal amounts of consuption like the difference between zero loss and maybe a .25 or .5 loss between oil changes .... Not 2 or 3 quarts between changes like some of you are seeing. I was about to buy a 2015 Subaru last year thinking, "certainly they have fixed the problem from the 2012 I had". So I called a Subaru service manager and asked him if they had fixed the problem. Instead of saying oh yes that was a " you fill in blanks resolution and it is all fixed in 2015", he proceeds to tell me that if my 2012 was only using one quart between changes that it was well within spec. He then made the mistake of telling me what the Spec was. And I swear he told me it it was 1.2 qts. per 1,000 miles. When I stopped laughing I made him tell me again because I couldn't believe he just said that. I then called the Mitsubishi dealer and said I'll take it the Outlander. Alex, I hope you get 250k on your Forester with no issues, but I agree with BobD. You couldn't sell me that for half what you paid for it right now.

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My friends wife bought a 13 Impreza against my best attempts to dissuade her. It was fine till just after 30k. Now they have jugs of 0w20 lying around for when it has to be topped off. Which is about every 2500 miles. My 13 XV uses a quart every 3000 miles, roughly.

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Go Green! .. Gallons of oil burned.. just some numbers for you tree huggers... miles on car qt. burned per quarts burned Gallons burned # Cars Gallons burned by Subarus over life of cars 150,000 4000 37.5 9.375 100,000 937,500 150,000 3000 50 12.5 100,000 1,250,000 150,000 2000 75 18.75 100,000 1,875,000 150,000 1000 150 37.5 100,000 3,750,000

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Guess it lost all of its formating but if you drive a Subaru that burns say two quarts between oil changes for 150,000 miles.. you are burning about 19 gallons of OIL over the life of that 1 car. Multiply that by say 100,000 Subaru cars and you have 1,900,000 gallons of OIL burned by those cars into the atmosphere. Hug those numbers.

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Has anyone read about subaru's use of slave labor? Well- "grey market labor"...

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A lot of angry chatter on here lately. We just hit 9000 miles on our Forester, and so far there's no oil usage. I lost about 1/3 quart during break in, but now it's holding steady. We are not going "easy" on our car either. my wife drives it daily 100 miles to work up the Garden State Parkway in NJ. Average speed is 75. Took a few long road trips which even included some rough and rugged fire road driving. Got to use the X-drive which was great! So 3000 miles into this oil change and so far so good. I want to believe that swapping out the Subaru oil for regular Dino oil during the first 1500 mile break in period had something to do with it. (Earlier post by me). I hope that out good fortune continues. I'll continue to post as we hit milestones with our car. I feel terrible for everyone who is having all this trouble.

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Hopefully it works out for you Fluke. The Subaru AWD is hard to beat. That Forester will drive past anything in the snow.

I have had my 2015 Forester 2.5 nearly a year and haven't noticed any consumption in that time. However it has low miles so I have only had to do one oil change since I got it. You won't be disappointed if you get one. I love mine!

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I love my forester! The handling, the leather seats, the 4x4.... need I go on? But my 2012 has burned a 1qt, 969ml every 1300km (808miles) for the last 20000kms. Sometimes it blows smoke out the back for a few seconds on start up. When i bought it i thought everyone was wingeing about the oil consumption issue. BOY WAS I WRONG!!! Do not buy one, even though they are a joy to drive:(

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So funny to read all of this. I had a 2011 Forester that used a lot of oil. I just got a 2016 Outback and am trying to be optimistic that they have solved this issue. Yesterday I stopped at the dealer to top off antifreeze which was always lower than expected. I mentioned the 2011 Forester oil and the service manager told me that dealership says you should call Subaru to confirm that they allow use of 5-30 as an option without voiding warranty. He said after two oil changes the engine will be adapted to that oil weight and the problem goes away. I was not comfortable at all hearing this. My dealer is in Countryside IL. I only have 1,500 miles and no reason to believe I have any oil problem so I will simply be monitoring and documenting my use of 0W20 as directed in the manual at 4,500 mile intervals. I will also check the oil at every fill up. I anyone ever sees documents from Subaru saying that 5w30 reduces oil consumption and is a valid alternative to 0w20 at any season without added risk of wear or voiding warranty I will consider it. This is just what one service manager said he did to his subaru and one mechanic seemed to reluctantly acknowledge that some people are doing it but he did not directly recommend it. It is possible to void your warranty in my opinion unless you had it as an option in writing from SoA. These guys might have an answer to some people's problems but that doesn't mean it doesn't have any negatives. I wonder what Subaru of America thinks about 5w30. The service manager said that SoA will approve of 5w30 in that engine if you call and ask. They know I have the 4cylinder not the 6 but that is one way they could say there was a misunderstanding if SoA didn't like this response. Anyone ever ask SoA? I feel silly calling when I don't intend to even change to 5w30. I am very picky about gas mileage and believe that 5w20 is part of the reason I can squeeze almost 29mpg from my outback.

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As an owner of a 2014 Forester with an oil consumption problem I would recommend that those of you in this situation contact Robert Silverman's office at lemonlaw.com

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I have a 2013 manual tranny Crosstrek that I FINALLY was able to get Subaru to put a new short block in at 37k miles! The oil consumption issue for mine started before the first oil change and continued to get worse until I was burning through 1 qt. every 1800 miles. That is when they finally got Subaru to agree to a new short block. So far I'm at 45k miles with one oil change after the first 3k miles since the new short block and I have not seen any oil loss. We will see how long this lasts, but Subaru lost a lifetime customer. No more after this experience unless they can fix this problem!

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Just a short summary of the rolling disaster area that my 2015 Forester is - New engine at 10k miles due to excessive oil consumption. Oil leak a few days later from the drain plug, another week and the new engine back out for a new rear main seal, now in once for another oil leak and the dealer can't find it. Oil still puddling on the garage floor - gonna go back in and waste another day at the dealer getting filled up with BS stories about how oil all over the bottom of the engine is not really an oil leak!

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I am planning to buy a new Forester 2015. After reading above comments, I will rethink

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Very wise vfdas! Rethink for sure!!!

For those complaining about oil consumption, how long are you going between oil changes?? When the interval was 3000 miles and 3 months, no, you shouldn't have to top the oil off if it was up to the full mark after the oil was changed, but with 5000, 6000, 7500 mile intervals or six months? Yes, you have to check your oil and top it off! That's true with any car. And yes, flat boxers will consume slightly more than a v engine or an inline engine. That said, Subaru builds excellent cars. If you take care of it, it'll run forever, and it's a very safe car, and handles excellently in all weather. That's worth having to figure out how to check a dipstick and where the oil goes in....

I own a 2015 Forester, and I love it, by the way. I am a mechanic, but you don't have to be a mechanic to check and top off oil.

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@ GW that sounds like the kind of cop-out answer Subaru have been chucking at us for YEARS. My toyota work truck doesn't burn oil and it uses the SAME oil,,, 0w20 And the Toyota goes 4k longer on that oil per the factory recommendations.

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I'm not saying ALL consumption is normal. If your vehicle is consuming more than what is stated in the owner's manual as normal, then yes, there is a problem, but if you understand how an engine actually works and what's inside of it, what seals and rings are used, etc, yes, some oil consumption is normal in any engine, and if the cylinders are sideways, it is more likely that more oil than an in line upright (like your Toyota) will get past the piston rings and get burned in the cylinders. That said, if your exhaust is blue, you're burning too much oil which is indicative of a serious problem that needs to be taken care of that you didn't cause, provided you've gotten your oil changed with the appropriate oil, on time, and checked the level between oil changes. The person who said they burn through 4-5 quarts in 6000-7500 miles has a serious problem with their engine. That shouldn't happen. 1-2 quarts would be normal.

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a quart every 1200 miles is ridiculous. Shame on anyone saying THAT is acceptable. Which Subaru does in the friggin manual.

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Shame on you for not properly researching a huge purchase like a car. You don't have to be in the industry to look at the owner's manual online before buying and read what other people are saying about it. I don't mean to sound rude, but I hear people all the time complaining about their car when their car is functioning how it was designed to function, and the only reason to have those complaints is not being an informed buyer. I spent a month looking into many cars before I made my decision, and I know what I was buying and what I was not. If the car consumes *more* oil than is specified in the manual, then take it to the dealer and demand they fix it. Lemon law is there for a reason - if they can't or won't fix it, you *can* do something about it, but if it is working how they say it should in the manual and you just don't like it, then trade the car.

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I bought the most researched and recommended car and it burns a ton of oil which subaru and its trolls like you say is normal. Shame on you.

But clearly, you personally did no research or you wouldn't have bought it. I'm not a "Subaru troll." I'm an automotive technician that works for Hyundai, not Subaru. I like Subarus. Some people don't. But AGAIN, you cannot be angry that the car is working how it is supposed to because you didn't do any research. You quoted the owner's manual to me. You could have found this information before purchasing the vehicle. I'm done with this. Apparently you're not a fan of reality or the truth and just want to whine about taking two minutes when you fill your tank to check your oil. I know, popping the hood and finding that yellow loop must be difficult. If you hate it so much, trade the car in and quit whining. Goodbye.

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Side mounted engines using oil is bull.I had a 4 cyl Honda Gold wing that never used a drop of oil and its a flat four opposed .My 95 explorer doesn't use a drop of oil either .

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Older Subaru's don't use oil either. Subaru actually says the standard for new Subaru oil consumption is 1 quart in 3,600 miles.

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If you choose to keep a Subaru that is losing oil like that you prolong your suffering. I dumped mine and love my new car. Do yourself a favor and dump the loser. Do all your friends a favor and warn them not to buy a Subaru!!!!! I would trade off the Subaru before more people get wind of these problems. This forum should be full of people that purchased a used Subaru without doing the needed research on the oil consumption issues. Subaru should be put out of business for treating their customers this way.

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Sorry Ginger but I own two Subaru's and the old one with 200,000 miles on it is the better car. I do virtually all my own mechanical work as I have done for decades so your condescending tone and attitude don't cut it with me. When a brand new car uses oil from the beginning and uses a quart in a thousand miles or less then nothing an apologist for Subaru says will convince me that the piece of junk I bought is actually a good car. I had a Toyota with over 300,000 miles that used a quart in 3,000 miles! The longest I went on an oil change was 5,000 miles and due to the oil consumption rate I was checking the oil level DAILY. In fact I changed the oil three times in the 10,000 miles I went before getting a new engine. Actually 4 counting the oil change Subaru did for the oil consumption test.

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Subaru's PR presence online is astounding!!!

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Anyone else find it funny that GW says... "But clearly, you personally did no research or you wouldn't have bought it".... and yet she bought a 2015. hmmmm and she/it says I knew what I was buying... and she apparently hasn't read the other threads on here ... "if it uses more than is recommended in the manual then return it".. LOL... I'm pretty sure she/it isn't a mechanic. I don't mind being rude. I'll give her/it a year before she is on here "whining" with the rest of of X-Subaru "Mechanics".

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Hi all. Giving my 12,000 mile update. For me, good news...so far. Doing the 2nd oil change today and not a drop missing as far as I can tell. I lost a bit during break in but now it seems to be holding steady. I'm still convinced that my switching to Dino oil during break in period helped the rings seat. Again, I've always been told that synthetic oil is a NO NO during break in. Its so slippery it doesn't allow the the rings and bearings to seat properly. In any event it hasn't hurt. My only continuing gripe is the auto lift gate. I can't ever seem to hit the button just right and the gate opens, beeps, clicks, closes, beeps, latches, etc... I wish that it wasn't so touchy. Other than that, love the car. Had to avoid a flying tire tread on the GSP and was so impressed with the cars nimble handling. I was really swerving too! Hopefully the tires aren't as crap as everyone makes them out to be in the snow. Update y'all in a few months!

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Aside from the oil consumption, our 2015 Forester runs great like a Camry! Agree with the tricky lift gate. When first bought, if click on the button it would would just slowly continue to rise hard despite resistance. In other words, if your garage door is closed and you try to open the lift gate, you could get sandwiched between the gate and the garage door! So I played around with the controls and made if semi-automatic. Still tricky. I can open most of the time right away, but my wife gets frustrated to find the right location of the button! Also, with the radio controls, I am old fashioned and like the volume and tuning knobs rather than the touch screen. FYI- these are not major complaints on an otherwise great vehicle except of course for the oil consumption!

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At this point my car is so screwed up that Subaru has offered to either buy it back or fix it until I am satisfied. Not sure which way I will go yet but I would say to anyone having problems with their new Subaru to document everything and keep after Subaru of America to do the right thing.

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2016 Forester, CVT trany with 5600 miles. Owners manual says ok to add 5w-30 dino oil. Changed to 5w-30 oil at 200 miles, again at 1000 miles, again at 3000 miles. Now after 2600 miles on the last oil change the oil level is down only 1/16 inch. Cold starting temps down to -10 degF with long warm ups because the heater system is poorest of any car I have ever owned. Others writing in about oil consumption problems starting at 20k or higher mileage does not have me optimistic..... If problems start will trade the suby in on Nissan or other brand. Will be first and last Suby. Sad truth is we were looking for a "safer" car, planned to sell our 1989 Nissan Sentra with 360,000 miles. Does not use 1 qt of oil between 4000 mile oil changes. I still have the Sentra...may keep it, and yes it has a good heater too.

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Wife's 2013 XV Crosstrek, I know different engine, had severe oil consumption when new. Talked to a local race engine builder about the problem when car lost half a quart in the first 500 miles. His advice was to ignore the manufacture break in and follow his steps on how they break in engines. This procedure works, car now with 40000 miles burns no oil and it hasn't since 6000 miles. First step, at around the 500 mile mark drain manufacture oil to remove most of the loose factory machining metals and greases. Fill with good synthetic motor oil, he recommended Pennzoil Platinum. Second step, they do this on a dyno, but this is what he recommended without one. When car is completely up to operating temps. find a nice long hill free of police and other cars, come to complete stop at bottom, accelerate to redline and go through all the gears hitting redline in each gear, except maybe last gear. When slowing down, no braking if possible, let car go through its downshifts or stop on its own. Third step, change oil immediately, drive normal and start monitoring oil consumption frequently for the next 5000 miles. Wife's car burnt 1/4 of a quart the next 5000 miles and zero after that. He basically said you're properly seating your rings and if you burn excessive oil after a pull there's something wrong. He also said, no they don't break in engines from the factory, if they did there wouldn't be early engine oil consumption. Other notes from our conversation, the first 10000 miles of your engines life are the most important, check oil every fuel fill up, if it needs a 1/4 of a quart, add it. And the most important thing, never run your oil level down to the warning light or what he called the to late light, if you do you've caused irreversible damage and your engine is going to probably burn oil for the rest of its life. Thought I'd share what has worked for my wife's XV, which are known to be oil burners. On a side note, my parents followed the manufactures break in on their Chevy Equinox and it burns a quart of oil between changes at 55000 miles.

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I don't know about redlining a new engine but a Subaru service manager that I know and trust recommends not babying a new Subaru engine but to drive it like you would normally. I have run my new engine a lot harder than the first one which I babied and it has only used a 1/3 quart in 3,000 miles.

I just drove my 2013 forrester 900 mi round trip. I checked oil before leaving. The last leg of the trip was 365 mi. Non-stop with cruise at 68. Car got 28.5mpg. When I exited the highway in home town it sounded like I was driving a diesel. Next morning I added a quart of oil and drove 10 mi. Checked oil at home and added another quart. 2qts in under 100 mi. car has 43,000 on it. At dealer now. Luckily I have extended warranty if needed. Then I'll just trade on a new one maybe. Is a good car but oil consumption is terrible. OH and the idiot light never came on. How do these cars pass emmisions or be able to claim how clean they are if that much oil is being passed.

I've got a 2015 manual forester. It's been burning a qt of oil every 1200 miles or so. The dealer is going to replace the block. Its got 7200 miles on it.After reading this I'm worried that may not fix the problem.

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The block replacement worked for my 2014 manual Forester. Even so, it was worthwhile for me to file a claim through lemonlaw.com.

I have a 2010 Forester, manual transmission, about 120,000 miles. For the past year I have been adding 2 QTS of oil per 1,000 miles in between oil changes and the power steering has a slow leak as well ( which makes it sound like the CV joints are going). My former Outback blew the head gasket twice. My former Subaru sedan had CV joint problems and issues with the synchronizer rings in the transmission--both expensive fixes. This is my last Subaru.

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GingerWrench: Automotive companies list service limits for oil consumption that are intentionally VERY low. Honda, Toyota, Ford, GM, and most others indicate that around 1QT/1000mi is a "normal" or "acceptable" burn rate. However, all of us know that any car burning a QT of oil every 1000 miles with less than 100,000 miles on it is ridiculous. No manufacturer designs their passenger cars to burn that much oil. In fact, they generally don't design their cars to burn any oil. Manufacturers create arbitrary high burn rates (1QT/1000-1200mi) to keep them from having to repair vehicles. Subaru upped the rate to 3600/1QT because they were being SUED. In so far, as the Outback/Legacy owners, in 2012/2013 MY2013 vehicles, no one was reporting it as the engine was "new" for that year. So all the research in the world wouldn't have told you anything about your prospective $30k car being a lemon.

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More information can be found here: http://www.subaruoutback.org/forums/104-gen-4-2010- 2014/280418-fb-series-engine-oil-burning-subaru-you.html This is based off the Forester and Outback / Legacy sites.

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I bought my 2015 Legacy 2.5, CVT trans. on 2/2/2015. Changed oil at 5,000 miles, then added another 2,300 miles....7,300 total. NO oil problems. The level on the dipstick hasn't changed.

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I have a 2015 forester CVT four cylinder version, we have over 30K miles on it now and have had no issue with oil consumption. I believe it is one of the best cars I have ever owned. I am a diesel guy, but I must say I love this car. I have been changing oil at 5K miles and now change on dipstick over that time and typically it looks very good and clean even at 5k miles.

1 out of 1 people think this is helpful.
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I have a 2015 Subaru Forrester (stick shift) and have been very unhappy with the oil consumption since the beginning. They are recommending engine main part to be replaced but by reading all this, I'm not sure if it will fix the problem, now... I think lemon law should be in use so that they can repay us..

2 out of 2 people think this is helpful.

Wow, I am glad I found this page… I have a 2015 Subaru Forester and have 31,700 miles on it. It started burning fuel about 7,000 miles ago. I have never owned a car that I have had to add oil in between changes. Very disappointing. I guess I need to ask for a consumption test? I am in Southern California… my dealer just said it was normal. WHAT???

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Read through the last few threads on this forum in the last 6 months. . You're going to find a trend is developing and that's that the Forrester models with the CVT transmission are NOT BURNING OIL. WHY is this?? Well, two possible reasons, the engine rpms on a manual transmissions generally have a greater swing when driven rising and falling faster with the normal rhythm of shifting gears and secondly, people who drive stick shift cars love to "red line" their engines. Ive had two cars with manual transmissions,. I know what people do, heck, I did it myself on my former cars. Show me any car and car owner and the person with the automatic transmission will generally go further.. Besides, the automatic transmission can actually shift faster than any manual, do it more smoothly and new modern CVT transmissions actually get BETTER fuel economy .. It's sad that the Subaru manual transmission is really not that good and a friend of mine that purchased one actually regrets it now. Had to replace a couple of clutches in 100,000 miles. My advice is skip the manual transmission altogether for the oil consumption, clutch issues and sloppy shifts.. I've driven my friends Forrester and it's really not nearly as responsive as my CVT.

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It's been a little over a year with my manual 2015 Forrester and I now have about 26,000 miles. Between my last two oil changes, I have had to fill a quart at around 3,000 miles after the oil change. It is a little annoying, but not worth the hassle at the dealer IMO. I have done a lot of mountain driving out of Denver, so that contributes to the oil consumption. In response to MarkW, the automatic doesn't shift faster because CVTs don't shift. And I never redline. It's ok for you just to say you simply prefer automatics because you and your friend must not know how to drive a manual if he's replacing two clutches in 100K and if you don't think the manual is responsive. I'm thankful for my decision on the manual specifically because it's more responsive in the mountains and anywhere else, but I also simply prefer manuals...

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Alex-. Just to clarify for you, I learned to drive on a manual transmission back in the 60s. I had two brand new manual transmission cars with well over 150,000 miles and no clutch problems, they just weren't Subaru's. My friends car, a Forrester had two clutches because the idiotic mechanic forgot to change the throw out bearing on their car and had multiple occasions of "bird noises". It wasn't until my mechanic fixed her car and she's finally happy right now, but, I've driven her car and it's NOT the greatest transmission. Now, as for your comment about CVT transmissions "don't shift"? What in the devil are you talking about?? My friend, CVT transmissions are constantly changing gears while you are driving, that's what they do.. it's a continuous variable transmission and it is always in the sweet spot for the engine speed... Sounds like the manual transmission is working for you and also that your oil consumption is not too bad. That is good. My two manual transmission cars were VWs, and I had them when I was much younger in my 20s early 30s.... Now that I'm in my 60s, yes, I prefer automatics, and the new ones actually get better fuel economy... I noticed that you didn't question that.. Of course, not everyone redlines their cars,. I occasionally did it, I was young... I realize now that is not a good thing. You can't redline an automatic, it just works. And, my preference for automatic transmissions is not because I don't know how to drive them, I just don't want to. In case you didn't know, here in Los Angeles, we have the most INTENSE, and challenging bumper to bumper traffic anywhere in the country. It's not a great thing to be number 1 for traffic congestion, but, it's a reality we have to live with. So, I can assure you that if you lived in LA or SoCal, you'd be likely driving an automatic transmission yourself. Peace.

10

2015 Forester. Started having oil consumption issues as far as I can tell, around 40,000 miles. Progressively got worse. Am now about to take in for second consumption test. The first test was deemed "invalid". Only because we caught them putting in an extra quart of oil to start the test. We documented when we got home and then told them.... after they said we had "passed the test. Got no documentation, just a " I wish you would have told us that first". There's more to the story, but will wait to see how this test goes. Not real happy with Subaru or their dealership. This, by the way, is our second Forester. After spending big bucks to get the last ones head gaskets replaced, we were told the new Forestor has fixed the problem! Can't wait to be done with this issue!

1 out of 1 people think this is helpful.
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WOW! We're you actually able to get this on your cell phone video?? You should have sent this to Subaru of America or at least report this dealership to Subaru corporate. This is EXACTLY what Subaru doesn't want.. in case you didn't know, Toyota had an oil burning problem with some of their cars, surprise! And, I talked with someone at Toyota because I was wondering, I have a 2009 PRIUS. Our car is not affected, but, they told me that they do this kind of "warranty work"all the time. It's easy money from corporate and they get reimbursed, so, they don't mind doing it. Look, your dealership is NOT being straight with you, find another dealership. If your car is NOT meeting the standard , they should FIX IT. "The first test was deemed "invalid". Only because we caught them putting in an extra quart of oil to start the test." 40,000 miles on a 2015 is a LOT OF MILES, where do you go?? I'm sure that your 2015 head gaskets are just fine? Is your 2015 a manual transmission?

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You all realize there is a class action lawsuit that deals with this issue. Google it for info if you haven't been notified by mail. It's a problem with some of the engines and not the way anyone drives. BTW, before the class action lawsuit I easily won a claim against Subaru under Lemon Law for excessive oil consumption on my '14 Forester.

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Poppajohn52, --YES, I'm sure that everyone knows this,. http://jalopnik.com/subaru-settles-lawsuit-over-oil-burning-cars- 1752805682

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More information -. http://www.girardgibbs.com/subaru-oil- consumption-class-action-lawsuit/

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No "mark", the dealers have been doing all they can to NOT fix the oil burning subarus. Toyota is NOT subaru. Buy an oil burning FB sube and see for yourself.\ The most common tactic they employ is fudging the "consumption test".

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79letour-. Actually,. Toyota and Subaru collaborate together a lot. You know, the BRZ and the FRS are really similar, if not identical. And,. my local dealer told me they do the oil consumption test for some of their affected cars all the time. They do the work and get paid from Toyota of America all the time. It's really a matter of your individual dealerships....call the corporate office and check it out with them. The corporate office does not want people at their dealerships ruining their overall brand and reputation..

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Maybe you've heard that phone calls and letters, especially letters and emails are the squeaky wheels that get the grease,. It's true.. but, you have to do it...

130

I've called the robots at SOA repeatedly. Its been three years and they haven't done jack &*^% Is it fun playing advocate for a big corporation that lies to customers?

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Your experiences are vastly different to mine, I found them to be very helpful..

130

Do you work for subaru or something? Aweful weird how you play PR guy for them on here so much.

1 out of 1 people think this is helpful.

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