How to rotate tires

Asked by Feb 17, 2013 at 09:48 AM about the 2007 Toyota Corolla LE

Question type: Maintenance & Repair

I have been told different things and don't know who to believe, do you do lie an X    RR to LF and LR to RF or in a circle RF to LF or what??  I think you guys know what I'm trying to ask 2 diff tire stores said diff ways and the dealer wants $80!! Forget THAT the dealer said they are thee only people "qualified" to do it and I have a had time believing that..or are they?  One tire is wearing out on the outside of the tire one is almost bald just the outside not inside on front. I would have not even noticed but my wheels were turned all the way left tires have about 30,000 miles on them thankx in advance

18 Answers

PS somebody said they always need to be mover to spin the other direction True?

front to back, back to front. Correct they are directional. There is a risk of de-lamination to change their usual direction-

2 of 2 people found this helpful.
Best Answer Mark helpful
5,175

If they're directional only go front to back but if not u can go side to side as well like fronts to back and backs to oppisite side front which is best for non directional tires. and as for bobs comment not sure how he knows they're directional unless u told him what kind u have.

true Robert- yer ole' BIAS PLY did not care!

5,175

prob not but even new tires can be directional or non directional.

Tire rotation is FREE if you go to TIRE PROS---these guys have their act together.

5,175

btw if your tires are wearing this way get an alignment.

1 of 1 people found this helpful.
1,095

it also sounds like you need an alignment. that one tire should not be wearing unevenly like that.

the design of each unique brand has it's certain peculiarites, just look at the design, it IS directional, the goodyear aquatread is one example- the whitewall stripe should be on the outside of the tire!

5,175

not all tires are directional :P

99,865

Try this chart

2 of 2 people found this helpful.
485

Always front left to rear right, rear right to front left, rear left to front right and front right to rear left. Unless they are directional.

1 of 1 people found this helpful.
5,175

tenspeed put a diagram :P

8,685

Several tire shops have told me to keep all tires spinning the same way whether directional or not. The steel belts have a nasty way of shifting when the rotation is changed. Having had several sets of tires with bad belts, I follow that religiously! Of course, directional tires have the rotation stamped into the sidewall, and that is the way they turn, period.

1 of 1 people found this helpful.

amen, Michael why do this? for fun and sport?

875

Yep...it's just best to try and keep em always rolling the same direction if possible, however there are always flat tires and if you happen to be lucky enough to have a full size spare as long as it's not a true directional, you can put it where you need it...same for the lil donut spares. Also there is usually a recommended rotation in the owners manual or on a trunk sticker as long as you keep the same type of tires on the car as original. ok...so how many of you know...rwd, best tires on front....fwd, best tires on back. This due to the "trailering effect" on the rear wheels of a front wheel drive car. The rear wheels are essentially just being dragged around by the car. They aren't steering and they aren't driving so the only real frictional forces they get, other than rolling resistance, are in turns. These are lateral forces and even if the rear tires are worn say 50% more than the front it can be a disaster in the right conditions (you needed tires, you just bought two) What happens is...particularly in wet conditions...with best tires on front you feel all confident in steering but the rear can slide out without ANY warning...lots of people spin off highways due to this effect (I myself do not care at all for FWD) . With best tires on back you will feel the give in the steering first and can adjust speed accordingly. This information comes directly from Michelin Tire Technician training videos.

4 of 4 people found this helpful.
8,685

I have always been told that you want the best grip on the rear wheels, no matter front or rear wheel drive. Of course, on all wheel drive, you have to replace all 4 tires at once, or risk damage to the transfer case.

875

If you can't steer the car, good grip on the back is useless. Like I said this comes from the Michelin Training Videos....Cars on test tracks, varying amounts of tread, varying road conditions...at 55mph, two fwd cars...one with good tread on front...one with good tread on back ....the one with the good tread on the front tires spun out of the curve every time. Of course they never recommend driving on low tread but if necessary put the good ones on the rear on a fwd car. On a rear drive car with good tires on the back the first thing you notice is that you have the wheel turned but the car is still going straight because now you can't steer...with the good tires on front you can still steer if the rear slides and make corrections.

1 of 1 people found this helpful.

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