What Honda vehicles can be towed 4 wheels down?

Asked by Sep 20, 2013 at 12:24 PM

Question type: General

I believe the CR-V can but other models?

29 Answers

NONE of them, thank you....these are delicate machines~!

7 out of 7 people think this is helpful.

if you backdrive the motor, the timing belt will snap as the imminent interference will wreck the motor~

4 out of 4 people think this is helpful.

dammit!, just rent one of these~__http://www.uhaul.com/Reservations/EquipmentDetail.aspx? model=at

7 out of 7 people think this is helpful.

No, not even the CR V if it's an automatic. All due respect, your information is mistaken, unless it specifically says that in your owners manual... then I stand corrected. But I know of no automatic that can be towed any distance, non emergency.. Manual in neutral, different story, that's fine

4 out of 4 people think this is helpful.

We were typing at the same time..at least we agree

2 out of 2 people think this is helpful.

Hey dave! you put a smile there everytime, my friend~

Perhaps you could simply drive the car and take an Amtrak back....that'd be sexy enough~

there we have it Rich, from the final authority with a Corolla himself, snap on the towbar if you've got a manual transmission...Automatics get a little toasty~

4 out of 4 people think this is helpful.

My Corolla owners manual allows unlimited four wheel towing for manuals and strictly forbids it in automatics. Don't see how a Honda would any different ..they call it dinghy towing, can be towed forward facing . Again, manual only

3 out of 3 people think this is helpful.

seems odd, with a two wheel tow, the front wheels immobilized, the rear wheels would...what? keep heatin' up to melt all the grease out of them?...personally don't buy it and could tow your way to point barrow with no trouble a-tall~

2 out of 2 people think this is helpful.

two wheel U-hauls are quite a bit more affordable too~...man or auto they don't care...immobilize the wheels with chains...used one for my 2500 mile drive with a Toyota corolla that we disconnected then used to do the Grand Canyon~

3 out of 3 people think this is helpful.


You know these will not work with a 4wd subie~

2 out of 2 people think this is helpful.

...sorry turns out I am the one out of his mind...fixin' a dryer 1/4 nut driver be thy only tool needed, but screws galore~...welcome to the private hell...try to keep cool as the parts dissemble~

1 out of 1 people think this is helpful.

Sorry, but I've towed a 2006 CR-V AT for over 30000mi with no problems but would like to update to a newer vehicle. I check with the dealer. Thanks for your opinions....

9 out of 9 people think this is helpful.

Corolla? I was asking about Honda's?

3 out of 3 people think this is helpful.

I was a UHaul Dealer so am familiar with their 'Tow Dollies' Since I'm a "Fulltimer" it would be rather expense to rent one 24/360! and then it's just another piece of equipment to stow..

3 out of 3 people think this is helpful.

It was just a comparison Rich, no direct connection. Since you have done that, that many miles with no problems I stand corrected. Its the same deal with a VW Baja, everybody says it can not be towed forward with rear wheels down but my Dad towed his behind his motorhome well over 40,000 miles, not a single problem

2 out of 2 people think this is helpful.

Thanks again to all....

2 out of 2 people think this is helpful.

almost got these three loads dry with .75 cents per load...pants and towels need to be hung out to dry yet....I'm underwhelmed if not for the good laundry folk (terry) who helped me fold the bedsheets~

Well I finally looked up the Owners Manual and it says you CAN tow 4 wheels down. It does recommend removing the accessory fuse if it will be a long tow so the battery won't discharge.

3 out of 3 people think this is helpful.

All CR-V's can be towed 4 down. Check your stuff before spouting incorrect info. I sell Honda's and they are the most popular car to be flat towed.

16 out of 16 people think this is helpful.
Tim Strom

I have had two CRVs - a 2002 and a 2009. Both were automatics and were flat towed tens of thousands of miles with no problems. There is a start-up procedure that must be followed to protect the transmission and speed is limited to 65 MPH. The procedure is simple - start car, let it warm up for a few minutes, then hold foot on brake and cycle through the gears - 1,2,3 and then to neutral letting the car idle for a minute or so in each gear and DO NOT SHIFT TO REVERSE but stop in neutral, shut engine off and leave ignition switch in accessory mode. I always carry a set of keys in my pocket so I can lock the car. Before towing, make sure that the parking brake is off, all lights and the radio are shut off. A good idea is to tow for no more than 6 hours and then recycle the start procedure as that will recharge the battery and protect the transmission. I did install another hot wire feed from my motorhome to keep the battery charged while on the road. Simple and effective and far less costly rather than driveline disconnects necessary on many vehicles - and yes, both of my CRVs were 4 wheel drive vehicles. It your vehicle is flat towable, that will be noted in your owner's manual or you can check on line or with an installer. I like Roadmaster equipment, especially their Invisibrake for the the towed vehicle.

9 out of 9 people think this is helpful.

sure you can, as long as you hook it to the back of whatever you're drivin'- so simple, a caveman could do it!

2 out of 2 people think this is helpful.
Brian Carman

People really need to do some research before they go answering questions as if they know what they're talking about. Most Hondas are designed to be towed 4-down. I deliver trucks for a living, and I tow my car 4-down behind those trucks. I meet a lot of other drivers that do what I do, and I've seen multiple Hondas. A ~2008 Honda Element was one person's tow vehicle. And a 2008 Honda Accord coup was another one I've seen. That guy said pretty much all Hondas are designed to be towed 4-down. He says he has to do it a very specific way, though. He says he turns the car on, shifts into R for 5 seconds, N for 5 second, D, 2, and 1 for 5 seconds each, then goes back up to N, and turns the car off. This sets the car up to be towed. If you do it differently, it will harm the transmission. My advice is not to do your research on websites like this, because a lot of people give bad advice here. Go to a website where people tow a lot. RV websites are what you need to look for. Do a search for "Dinghy vehicle list." You'll find lists of vehicles specifically designed to be towed 4-down. You'll see if your vehicle is on the list or not. Also, be sure to look up the process for towing your car so you'll know how to set the gearshift properly. And if all else fails, buy a stick. Can't go wrong with a stick. :) I don't recommend tow dollies or trailers. They're a huge pain. But also, keep in mind that you'll spend a good $800 or more on your tow setup on your car, depending on your setup and who installs it. Some of them don't install so easily--they can be a pain to install. Good luck.

5 out of 5 people think this is helpful.

For what it's worth, I actually read the owners manual for my 1991 Accord with automatic transmission. The manual says that (1) it's definitely best to tow it with the front wheels OFF the ground, but (2) you can tow it (it doesn't say how far) with all four wheels on the ground IF you first start the ending, then shift into drive, then shift into neutral, then kill the engine. My gut is telling me to just pick up a tow dolly and use that. Feels safer.


I own an automatic front wheel drive 2013 Honda Fit and page 159 of the manual specifically states that it can be flat towed in neutral with the key in accessory mode! So those of you who can't seem to find the time to actually read, I suggest you open your eyes, do some research and shut your mouth before spouting off about something you obviously know very little about!

2 out of 2 people think this is helpful.
Michael Contros

Correct answer is: Step 1. Start, warm up to operating temperature, maybe 5 minutes or till the cooling fans cycle once. Step 2. Engage emergency brake and also hold foot brake, shift from park to D1 30 sec., D2 30 sec, D3 30sec, D4 30 sec, Neutral. Step 3. Engine off but leave key on 1 click so steering is free. Hook up tow bar to Tow vehicle, make all connections for lights Make sure tow vehicle is in park, all connections tight, safety chains in place, all lights, turn, brake working. STEP 4 Now release emergency brake on Honda Civic, Crv, Fit, etc. Step 5. Tow till you need fuel in Tow Vehicle, usually 300-400 miles. STEP 6 When you stop to fill up with fuel on Towing Vehicle * REPEAT STEPS 1-5 I am 5 times Recertified NIASE master technician, 20 years Professional tow truck operator...Motorhome jockey..lol..

2 out of 2 people think this is helpful.

We are original owners of a 2012 Fit Sport with automatic transmission, specifically purchased in April 2012 BECAUSE Honda told us it could be flat towed. We too have fallen victim to Honda America's decision not to honor their powertrain warranty. Page 159 of the Owner's manual reads: "Towing Your Vehicle Your vehicle can be towed behind a motorhome When Your Vehicle is Towed Behind a Motorhome Perform the following procedure before towing your vehicle. Automatic Transmission models 1. Check the transmission fluid level > Make sure the fluid level is between the upper and lowermarks. 2. Start the engine. 3. Depress the brake pedal. Move the shift lever through all its positions. 4. Shift to D and hold for five seconds, then to N. Let engine run for three minutes, then turn it off. 5. Release the parking break. 6. Leave the ignition switch in ACCESSORY. > Make sure the steering wheel does not lock. 7. Turn off all the electric devices. Do not use any accessory power sockets. > This can prevent the batter from running down. >>>Towing your Vehicle Automatic transmission models NOTICE Failure to follow the recommended instructions exactly will result in severe automatic transmission damage. If you cannot shift the transmission or start the engine, your vehicle must be transported on a flat bed truck or trailer. Do not exceed 65 mph (100km/h) Consult your towing parts sales or rental agency if any other items are recommended or required for your towing situation. Automatic Transmission Models If you tow your vehicle behind a motorhome, the transmission fluid must be changed every 2 years or 30,000 miles (48,000 km), whichever comes first. >>> When Your Vehicle is Towed Behind a Motorhome Automatic transmission models NOTICE Severe transmission damage will occur if the vehicle is shifted from R to N and then towed with the drive wheels on the ground." Page 160 reads: "•Extended Towing If you tow more than 8 hours in one day, you should repeat the "before towing your vehicle procedure" at least every 8 hours." The remaining information on the page relates to removing the vehicle's 30 amp radio fuse to prevent the battery from running down. Page 10 of the Honda Fit Warranties Manual reads: "Your powertrain is covered for 5 years or 60,000 miles, whichever comes first." Now having regurgitating what is written in the Honda Fit Owner's and Warranties Manuals, here is our story. Our 2012 Honda Fit has been driven 27,361 and is less than 5 years old and still under warranty. We are currently in the San Diego area on a 6-week cross-country road trip. Our Fit started making weird noises that sounded like a fan belt slippage. A burnt rubber smell reinforced our suspicion. We drove to a nearby Jiffy Lube. The manager took it for a spin around the block. When he returned, he told me he thought the transmission was the problem. OBTW, no warning lights came on to indicate there was a problem and fluid levels were where they should have been. On Monday, Sept. 26th, we towed the Fit to a San Diego area Honda dealership. After explaining our situation to the Service Tech, he aggressively confronted me asking "Who told you that you could flat tow your car?" I sensed he didn't believe me when I just as aggressively replied "Honda". I recited by memory the pre-tow procedures and warnings. It remained obvious he doubted me. As we finished up the paperwork, I noticed he had included an estimated cost. When I told him the car was still under warranty, he told me Honda would decided if the damage fell under warranty. While stowing our towing accessories, he came out recited the pre-tow procedures and skeptically asked me if I performed all the required procedures. On the morning of the 27th, he called and informed me Honda America had declined to honor the warranty and claimed I must have done something wrong and that Honda America had the final word. I responded by telling him the courts and not Honda America will have the final word. I told him I wanted everything he was telling put into writing. He went on to inform me there was a replacement transmission in Los Angeles and if I gave the go ahead he was certain they could have me back on the road by week's end. I told him to proceed. To add insult to injury, he call me that afternoon to tell me Honda America was requiring me to post a $1,200 deposit on the old transmission's core that will be reimbursed 1) when it is received by Honda America and 2) only if it can be rebuilt. Think about it for a second; Honda is going to charge me $5,800 for parts and labor and then demand a ransom of $1,200 for something I will have paid for to be replaced!?! Yesterday afternoon (the 29th), the Tech called to inform me the Fit was ready to be picked up. When we got to the dealership, the Tech told us the Service Manager wanted to talk to us. Both the Tech and Service Manager told us they were stunned that Honda America had declined to honor the warranty; especially since there was no proof we had done anything wrong to cause the problem. I told them I appreciated their sentiments and asked they inform Honda America that they have lost a customer for life and might lose other potential customers contemplating purchasing a Honda vehicle to tow behind their motorhome.

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