2021 Honda Passport vs 2022 Cadillac Escalade

2021 Honda Passport
2021 Honda Passport
$32,790MSRP
Overview
Overview
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2022 Cadillac Escalade
2022 Cadillac Escalade
$77,795MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2021 Honda Passport
$32,790MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2022 Cadillac Escalade
$77,795MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now

CarGurus highlights

Winning Vehicle Image

According to CarGurus experts, the overall rating for the 2021 Honda Passport is 8.0 out of 10, while the 2022 Cadillac Escalade scores 7.3 out of 10. Based on these ratings, the 2021 Honda Passport is the recommended choice for its higher overall rating, strong performance, and excellent safety features.

Overview

MSRP

$32,790

MSRP

$77,795

Average price

$28,476

Average price

$80,734

Listings

1188

Listings

373
Ratings & Reviews
User Reviews
User Reviews

Expert reviews

8.0 out of 10

Expert reviews

7.3 out of 10
Pros
  • Great handling
  • Powerful engine
  • Comfortable
Cons
  • Irritating transmission
  • Uncomfortable seats
Pros
  • Multiple powertrain options
  • Impressive technology
  • Easy-to-use technology
Cons
  • Poor ride quality
  • Poor fuel economy
  • Interior materials feel cheap

2021 Honda Passport Reviews Summary

The 2021 Honda Passport was introduced for the 2019 model year. It carries over to 2021 largely unchanged, but with some additional features. First used by Honda in the early 1990s, the Passport name harkens back to a time when SUVs were more about rugged off-road capability. SUVs are very different beasts these days, and the Passport bridges the gap as an adventurous crossover SUV that is designed with daily life in mind.

The Passport is closely related to the Honda Pilot. The fact that Honda offers multiple midsize SUVs might seem confusing. Automakers always talk about not wanting one model to cannibalize sales of another. Though the Honda Passport and the Honda Pilot are in the same category, the Passport stands out as a more active alternative. It leverages that older more rugged Honda nameplate and backs it up with some features not found on the family-hauling Pilot.

2022 Cadillac Escalade Reviews Summary

Over roughly two decades in production, the Cadillac Escalade has become the General Motors luxury brand’s de facto flagship. It may share underpinnings with more pedestrian SUVs and pickup trucks from other GM brands, but the Escalade sits at the top of the Cadillac hierarchy in price, size, and—thanks to Cadillac’s constant reshuffling of its other nameplates—name recognition. It’s also an established player in a robust niche of big luxury SUVs.

The Escalade’s competitive set splits into two camps: other truck-like body-on-frame SUVs (Lincoln Navigator, Infiniti QX80, Jeep Grand Wagoneer, Lexus LX) and upscale unibody SUVs (BMW X7, Land Rover Range Rover, Mercedes-Benz GLS-Class). It’s a good time to be shopping for a full-size luxury SUV, in other words.

Cadillac has one of the freshest entries in this group. The Escalade was redesigned for the 2021 model year, adding a number of notable features like a 38-inch OLED display screen and GM’s Super Cruise hands-free driving system.

Changes for this generation’s sophomore model year are minor. A Buckle to Drive feature that forces the driver to buckle their seatbelt before setting off is now standard, lane-keep assist and lane-departure warning are now standard on the base Escalade Luxury trim level, and Premium Luxury Platinum and Sport Platinum models gets standard puddle lamps. Cadillac also added three extra-cost colors: Mahogany Metallic, Galactic Gray Metallic, and Wilder Metallic.

The Escalade is available in standard-wheelbase and long-wheelbase Escalade ESV body styles (the latter will be covered in a separate review), with the option of gasoline or diesel engines and five trim levels: Luxury, Premium Luxury, Sport, Premium Luxury Platinum, and Sport Platinum. We hoisted ourselves into a standard-length Premium Luxury diesel model for this review.

No video found
No video found
Popular Features & Specs

Engine

3.5L 280 hp V6

Engine

6.2L 420 hp V8

Drive Train

FWD

Drive Train

RWD

Seating Capacity

5

Seating Capacity

8

Horsepower

280 hp @ 6000 rpm

Horsepower

420 hp @ 5600 rpm

MPG City

20

MPG City

14

MPG Highway

25

MPG Highway

19
2021 Honda Passport
2021 Honda Passport
$32,790MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2022 Cadillac Escalade
2022 Cadillac Escalade
$77,795MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2021 Honda Passport
$32,790MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2022 Cadillac Escalade
$77,795MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now

CarGurus highlights

Winning Vehicle Image

According to CarGurus experts, the overall rating for the 2021 Honda Passport is 8.0 out of 10, while the 2022 Cadillac Escalade scores 7.3 out of 10. Based on these ratings, the 2021 Honda Passport is the recommended choice for its higher overall rating, strong performance, and excellent safety features.

Overview
MSRP
$32,790
$77,795
Average price
$28,476
$80,734
Listings
Ratings & Reviews
User reviews
4.6
4.8
Expert reviews

8.0 out of 10

Read full review

7.3 out of 10

Read full review
Pros & cons
Pros
  • Great handling
  • Powerful engine
  • Comfortable
Cons
  • Irritating transmission
  • Uncomfortable seats
Pros
  • Multiple powertrain options
  • Impressive technology
  • Easy-to-use technology
Cons
  • Poor ride quality
  • Poor fuel economy
  • Interior materials feel cheap
Summary

The 2021 Honda Passport was introduced for the 2019 model year. It carries over to 2021 largely unchanged, but with some additional features. First used by Honda in the early 1990s, the Passport name harkens back to a time when SUVs were more about rugged off-road capability. SUVs are very different beasts these days, and the Passport bridges the gap as an adventurous crossover SUV that is designed with daily life in mind.

The Passport is closely related to the Honda Pilot. The fact that Honda offers multiple midsize SUVs might seem confusing. Automakers always talk about not wanting one model to cannibalize sales of another. Though the Honda Passport and the Honda Pilot are in the same category, the Passport stands out as a more active alternative. It leverages that older more rugged Honda nameplate and backs it up with some features not found on the family-hauling Pilot.

Over roughly two decades in production, the Cadillac Escalade has become the General Motors luxury brand’s de facto flagship. It may share underpinnings with more pedestrian SUVs and pickup trucks from other GM brands, but the Escalade sits at the top of the Cadillac hierarchy in price, size, and—thanks to Cadillac’s constant reshuffling of its other nameplates—name recognition. It’s also an established player in a robust niche of big luxury SUVs.

The Escalade’s competitive set splits into two camps: other truck-like body-on-frame SUVs (Lincoln Navigator, Infiniti QX80, Jeep Grand Wagoneer, Lexus LX) and upscale unibody SUVs (BMW X7, Land Rover Range Rover, Mercedes-Benz GLS-Class). It’s a good time to be shopping for a full-size luxury SUV, in other words.

Cadillac has one of the freshest entries in this group. The Escalade was redesigned for the 2021 model year, adding a number of notable features like a 38-inch OLED display screen and GM’s Super Cruise hands-free driving system.

Changes for this generation’s sophomore model year are minor. A Buckle to Drive feature that forces the driver to buckle their seatbelt before setting off is now standard, lane-keep assist and lane-departure warning are now standard on the base Escalade Luxury trim level, and Premium Luxury Platinum and Sport Platinum models gets standard puddle lamps. Cadillac also added three extra-cost colors: Mahogany Metallic, Galactic Gray Metallic, and Wilder Metallic.

The Escalade is available in standard-wheelbase and long-wheelbase Escalade ESV body styles (the latter will be covered in a separate review), with the option of gasoline or diesel engines and five trim levels: Luxury, Premium Luxury, Sport, Premium Luxury Platinum, and Sport Platinum. We hoisted ourselves into a standard-length Premium Luxury diesel model for this review.

Video
No video found
No video found
Popular Features & Specs
Engine
3.5L 280 hp V6
6.2L 420 hp V8
Drive Train
FWD
RWD
Seating Capacity
5
8
Horsepower
280 hp @ 6000 rpm
420 hp @ 5600 rpm
MPG City
20
14
MPG Highway
25
19
Look and feel
2021 Honda Passport
9/10
2022 Cadillac Escalade
6/10
The 2021 Honda Passport was essentially a shortened version of the Pilot, featuring two rows of seats instead of three. This similarity was evident at a glance, leading some to dub the Passport a "Pilot Sport." Inside, the Passport's dashboard layout mirrored that of the Pilot, including Honda's awkward "button shifter" design instead of a conventional lever. Despite these corporate design choices, the Passport boasted a spacious interior with high-quality materials throughout. Trim levels for the 2021 Passport included Sport, EX-L, Touring, and Elite. The entry-level Sport came with features like 20-inch alloy wheels, LED fog lights, push-button start, tri-zone climate control, and a seven-speaker audio system. The EX-L trim added leather upholstery, a power moonroof, and a power rear liftgate. The Touring trim included front-and-rear parking sensors, a hands-free liftgate, and a WiFi hotspot. The top-tier Elite trim offered heated and ventilated front seats, a heated steering wheel, and wireless device charging. The 2022 Cadillac Escalade made a bold first impression with its massive size and unapologetic design. The grille, LED daytime running lights, and taillights were scaled to match its bulk, with the taillights vaguely recalling classic Cadillac tailfins. The front end, with its tall hood and vertical running lights, resembled a diesel locomotive more than a car. The various styling elements emphasized the Escalade's bulk, making it distinct from other GM full-size SUVs. The 22-inch wheels on our test car looked tiny compared to the vast expanse of sheet metal. The Escalade followed Cadillac's pattern of offering different trim pieces for "sport" and "luxury" models. The Luxury and Premium Luxury trims featured bright exterior trim and wheels, while the Sport trim had darkened trim, including a mesh grille. The Escalade rode on the same body-on-frame architecture as other GM full-size SUVs and trucks, which may not seem ideal for a luxury vehicle but has been a successful formula. The interior featured leather upholstery, wood trim, and a massive panoramic sunroof, but lacked a cohesive design theme. Some materials looked nice, but there were still cheap-looking plastic bits.
Performance
2021 Honda Passport
7/10
2022 Cadillac Escalade
6/10
The 2021 Honda Passport came standard with a 3.5-liter V6 engine producing 280 horsepower and 262 pound-feet of torque, paired with a nine-speed automatic transmission. It offered standard front-wheel drive (FWD) and optional all-wheel drive (AWD). The V6 provided strong acceleration, and the automatic transmission managed power well. The engine's stop-start system could be abrupt, but there was a switch to disable it. The Passport's ride was a blend of comfort and refined handling, with 8.1 inches of ground clearance and AWD models featuring Intelligent Traction Management with Snow, Sand, and Mud drive modes. FWD Passports could tow up to 3,500 pounds, while AWD models could tow up to 5,000 pounds. The 2022 Cadillac Escalade offered two powertrain choices. The standard 6.2-liter gasoline V8 produced 420 horsepower and 460 pound-feet of torque. A $100 option was GM’s Duramax 3.0-liter turbocharged inline-six diesel engine, producing 277 horsepower and 460 pound-feet of torque. Both engines were paired with a 10-speed automatic transmission and standard rear-wheel drive (RWD) or optional four-wheel drive (4WD). A 2023 Cadillac Escalade-V performance model was available with a 682-horsepower 6.2-liter supercharged V8. The diesel engine provided smooth power delivery and a lower torque peak, making it an asset when pulling away from a stop. The gasoline engine had a maximum towing capacity of 8,200 pounds, slightly more than the diesel. However, the Escalade's ride was unsettled, with the body never feeling settled and vibrations from pavement imperfections.
Form and function
2021 Honda Passport
8/10
2022 Cadillac Escalade
8/10
The 2021 Honda Passport offered a generous 100.8 cubic feet of cargo space with the rear seats folded, and 50.5 cubic feet with the second row in use. An additional 2.5 cubic feet was available in an under-floor storage tray. The EX-L trim featured a power liftgate, while the Touring and Elite trims included a hands-free power liftgate. The upright seating position provided excellent visibility, and the center console had a deep center bin and an open cargo tray. Both front and rear seats had deep in-door pockets for storage. The rear seats offered plenty of headroom and legroom, and they could recline and slide for added comfort. The 2022 Cadillac Escalade shared its body shell and chassis with the Chevrolet Tahoe and GMC Yukon, while the extended Escalade ESV was a cousin of the Chevrolet Suburban and GMC Yukon XL. The standard Escalade measured 211.9 inches long, while the ESV was 227 inches long. This platform sharing resulted in a cavernous cabin, offering the most first-row and third-row legroom among full-size luxury SUVs. Second-row captain’s chairs and a 60/40 power split-folding third-row bench seat were standard, with a power-folding 60/40 bench seat available as a no-cost option. The Escalade offered 25.5 cubic feet of cargo space with all seats in place, 63.0 cubic feet with the third-row seats folded, and 109.1 cubic feet with all rear seats folded. However, the raised center console provided limited storage space, and the 12-way power adjustable front seats with massage and lumbar support felt like they could have come from one of the Escalade’s GM cousins.
Technology
2021 Honda Passport
7/10
2022 Cadillac Escalade
9/10
For 2021, Honda made Android Auto and Apple CarPlay standard on the Passport, included with the newly-standard 8-inch touchscreen infotainment system. This was a distinct advantage over the three-row Pilot, which required moving up to at least the EX trim to get CarPlay and Android Auto. However, the Passport's infotainment system had dated graphics, a confusing menu layout, and a volume dial that felt like an afterthought. The audio interface lacked a tuning dial, which was a notable omission. The 2022 Cadillac Escalade featured one of the most elaborate infotainment displays in any current production vehicle. The 38-inch curved OLED display consisted of three screens: a 14.2-inch digital instrument cluster, a 16.9-inch touchscreen, and a 7.2-inch screen for trip-computer functions. Wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, as well as Bluetooth connectivity, were standard. Cadillac paid attention to how the display fit into the dashboard, with icons arranged to fit the screen's shape. Physical toggles for climate control and other functions were retained. However, the carousel format for changing radio stations was awkward to use while driving, and the rotary controller seemed like an afterthought. The Escalade's OLED screens provided unparalleled resolution for the standard 360-degree camera system, and the rearview camera mirror eliminated blind spots. Additional tech features included a head-up display, night vision, and augmented-reality navigation. A 19-speaker AKG Studio sound system was standard, but difficult to tune properly.
Safety
2021 Honda Passport
9/10
2022 Cadillac Escalade
8/10
The 2021 Honda Passport came well equipped with advanced safety features such as automatic emergency braking, forward collision warning, lane departure warning, and adaptive cruise control. Available driver assistance features included blind-spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic alert, and front-and-rear parking sensors. The Passport received an overall rating of five out of five stars from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) gave the Passport top "Good" scores in most crash tests, with "Acceptable" ratings for the passenger-side small overlap front crash test, headlights, and child-seat anchor ease of use. The front crash prevention tech received a second-tier "Advanced" rating. The 2022 Cadillac Escalade came standard with adaptive cruise control, forward-collision warning, automatic emergency braking (front and rear), front and rear park assist, lane-keep assist, and lane-departure warning. Blind-spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert were standard on Premium Luxury and higher trims, with trailer blind-spot monitoring standard on Premium Luxury Platinum trims and above. Super Cruise, a $2,500 option on most trim levels, offered hands-free driving on pre-mapped highways and used a driver-facing camera to check for distraction. While the system occasionally disengaged for unknown reasons, it provided smooth and natural responses. The Escalade's safety ratings were not published by the IIHS or NHTSA for this model year.
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