2021 Honda CR-V vs 2022 Cadillac Escalade

2021 Honda CR-V
2021 Honda CR-V
$25,350MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2022 Cadillac Escalade
2022 Cadillac Escalade
$77,795MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2021 Honda CR-V
$25,350MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2022 Cadillac Escalade
$77,795MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
Overview

MSRP

$25,350

MSRP

$77,795

Average price

$26,400

Average price

$80,236

Listings

2660

Listings

365
Ratings & Reviews
User Reviews
User Reviews

Expert reviews

7.8 out of 10

Expert reviews

7.3 out of 10
Pros
  • Plenty of cargo space
  • Standard advanced safety features
  • Excellent value for money
Cons
  • Uninspired styling
  • Fairly pedestrian performance
Pros
  • Multiple powertrain options
  • Impressive technology
  • Easy-to-use technology
Cons
  • Poor ride quality
  • Poor fuel economy
  • Interior materials feel cheap

2021 Honda CR-V Reviews Summary

Even in a grim year, Honda is selling a staggering number of CR-Vs. The CR-V is the best-selling Honda by far. It’s also the second best-selling compact SUV, just behind the Toyota RAV4. And it's the fifth best-selling vehicle in the U.S., and if you take out all the commercial sales of full-size pickups it’s one of the two best-selling vehicles year in and year out.

So it’s hard to argue against the CR-V formula. Honda’s been at this almost as long as crossovers have been a thing, launching the CR-V in 1997—a year after the RAV4 debuted.

The funny thing is, aside from sales volume, there’s only one thing the CR-V particularly excels at. Aesthetics are subjective, but it would be hard to argue the CR-V is the best looking vehicle in its class. It’s not the cheapest. It’s not the best equipped, especially at the middle to lower trim levels. It’s not the fastest, nor is it the quietest, or the most fuel efficient. It’s not even the most reliable, showing up nowhere in J.D. Power's Most Reliable list.

So what makes it so appealing to American consumers? Let’s see if we can figure that out.

2022 Cadillac Escalade Reviews Summary

Over roughly two decades in production, the Cadillac Escalade has become the General Motors luxury brand’s de facto flagship. It may share underpinnings with more pedestrian SUVs and pickup trucks from other GM brands, but the Escalade sits at the top of the Cadillac hierarchy in price, size, and—thanks to Cadillac’s constant reshuffling of its other nameplates—name recognition. It’s also an established player in a robust niche of big luxury SUVs.

The Escalade’s competitive set splits into two camps: other truck-like body-on-frame SUVs (Lincoln Navigator, Infiniti QX80, Jeep Grand Wagoneer, Lexus LX) and upscale unibody SUVs (BMW X7, Land Rover Range Rover, Mercedes-Benz GLS-Class). It’s a good time to be shopping for a full-size luxury SUV, in other words.

Cadillac has one of the freshest entries in this group. The Escalade was redesigned for the 2021 model year, adding a number of notable features like a 38-inch OLED display screen and GM’s Super Cruise hands-free driving system.

Changes for this generation’s sophomore model year are minor. A Buckle to Drive feature that forces the driver to buckle their seatbelt before setting off is now standard, lane-keep assist and lane-departure warning are now standard on the base Escalade Luxury trim level, and Premium Luxury Platinum and Sport Platinum models gets standard puddle lamps. Cadillac also added three extra-cost colors: Mahogany Metallic, Galactic Gray Metallic, and Wilder Metallic.

The Escalade is available in standard-wheelbase and long-wheelbase Escalade ESV body styles (the latter will be covered in a separate review), with the option of gasoline or diesel engines and five trim levels: Luxury, Premium Luxury, Sport, Premium Luxury Platinum, and Sport Platinum. We hoisted ourselves into a standard-length Premium Luxury diesel model for this review.

No video found
No video found
Popular Features & Specs

Engine

1.5L 190 hp I4

Engine

6.2L 420 hp V8

Drive Train

FWD

Drive Train

RWD

Seating Capacity

5

Seating Capacity

8

Horsepower

190 hp @ 5600 rpm

Horsepower

420 hp @ 5600 rpm

MPG City

28

MPG City

14

MPG Highway

34

MPG Highway

19
2021 Honda CR-V
2021 Honda CR-V
$25,350MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2022 Cadillac Escalade
2022 Cadillac Escalade
$77,795MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2021 Honda CR-V
$25,350MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2022 Cadillac Escalade
$77,795MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
Overview
MSRP
$25,350
$77,795
Average price
$26,400
$80,236
Listings
Ratings & Reviews
User reviews
4.5
4.8
Expert reviews

7.8 out of 10

Read full review

7.3 out of 10

Read full review
Pros & cons
Pros
  • Plenty of cargo space
  • Standard advanced safety features
  • Excellent value for money
Cons
  • Uninspired styling
  • Fairly pedestrian performance
Pros
  • Multiple powertrain options
  • Impressive technology
  • Easy-to-use technology
Cons
  • Poor ride quality
  • Poor fuel economy
  • Interior materials feel cheap
Summary

Even in a grim year, Honda is selling a staggering number of CR-Vs. The CR-V is the best-selling Honda by far. It’s also the second best-selling compact SUV, just behind the Toyota RAV4. And it's the fifth best-selling vehicle in the U.S., and if you take out all the commercial sales of full-size pickups it’s one of the two best-selling vehicles year in and year out.

So it’s hard to argue against the CR-V formula. Honda’s been at this almost as long as crossovers have been a thing, launching the CR-V in 1997—a year after the RAV4 debuted.

The funny thing is, aside from sales volume, there’s only one thing the CR-V particularly excels at. Aesthetics are subjective, but it would be hard to argue the CR-V is the best looking vehicle in its class. It’s not the cheapest. It’s not the best equipped, especially at the middle to lower trim levels. It’s not the fastest, nor is it the quietest, or the most fuel efficient. It’s not even the most reliable, showing up nowhere in J.D. Power's Most Reliable list.

So what makes it so appealing to American consumers? Let’s see if we can figure that out.

Over roughly two decades in production, the Cadillac Escalade has become the General Motors luxury brand’s de facto flagship. It may share underpinnings with more pedestrian SUVs and pickup trucks from other GM brands, but the Escalade sits at the top of the Cadillac hierarchy in price, size, and—thanks to Cadillac’s constant reshuffling of its other nameplates—name recognition. It’s also an established player in a robust niche of big luxury SUVs.

The Escalade’s competitive set splits into two camps: other truck-like body-on-frame SUVs (Lincoln Navigator, Infiniti QX80, Jeep Grand Wagoneer, Lexus LX) and upscale unibody SUVs (BMW X7, Land Rover Range Rover, Mercedes-Benz GLS-Class). It’s a good time to be shopping for a full-size luxury SUV, in other words.

Cadillac has one of the freshest entries in this group. The Escalade was redesigned for the 2021 model year, adding a number of notable features like a 38-inch OLED display screen and GM’s Super Cruise hands-free driving system.

Changes for this generation’s sophomore model year are minor. A Buckle to Drive feature that forces the driver to buckle their seatbelt before setting off is now standard, lane-keep assist and lane-departure warning are now standard on the base Escalade Luxury trim level, and Premium Luxury Platinum and Sport Platinum models gets standard puddle lamps. Cadillac also added three extra-cost colors: Mahogany Metallic, Galactic Gray Metallic, and Wilder Metallic.

The Escalade is available in standard-wheelbase and long-wheelbase Escalade ESV body styles (the latter will be covered in a separate review), with the option of gasoline or diesel engines and five trim levels: Luxury, Premium Luxury, Sport, Premium Luxury Platinum, and Sport Platinum. We hoisted ourselves into a standard-length Premium Luxury diesel model for this review.

Video
No video found
No video found
Popular Features & Specs
Engine
1.5L 190 hp I4
6.2L 420 hp V8
Drive Train
FWD
RWD
Seating Capacity
5
8
Horsepower
190 hp @ 5600 rpm
420 hp @ 5600 rpm
MPG City
28
14
MPG Highway
34
19
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