2020 Honda Civic Hatchback vs 2021 Honda Civic

2020 Honda Civic Hatchback
2020 Honda Civic Hatchback
$21,750MSRP
Overview
Overview
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2021 Honda Civic
2021 Honda Civic
$21,250MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2020 Honda Civic Hatchback
$21,750MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2021 Honda Civic
$21,250MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now

CarGurus highlights

Winning Vehicle Image

According to CarGurus experts, the overall rating for the 2020 Honda Civic Hatchback is 7.7 out of 10, while the 2021 Honda Civic scores 7.2 out of 10. Based on these ratings, the 2020 Honda Civic Hatchback emerges as the better choice, offering a more versatile and modern package, balancing performance, comfort, and technology features effectively.

Choose the 2021 Honda Civic if:

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7.2of 10overall
  • You need a car with comprehensive safety ratings, including a Top Safety Pick for the Touring trim and five stars from the NHTSA.
  • You prefer a broader choice of trim levels, each offering unique features and amenities specific to your needs.
  • You're looking for a fuel-efficient sedan with modern infotainment including Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, especially in higher trims.
Overview

MSRP

$21,750

MSRP

$21,250

Average price

$22,467

Average price

$21,502

Listings

318

Listings

2088
Ratings & Reviews
User Reviews
User Reviews

Expert reviews

7.7 out of 10

Expert reviews

7.2 out of 10
Pros
  • Stylish design
  • Fun to drive
Cons
  • Outdated technology
Pros
  • Stylish design
  • Multiple body styles
  • Fun to drive
Cons
  • Underwhelming base engine
  • Outdated technology
  • Interior materials feel cheap

2020 Honda Civic Hatchback Reviews Summary

When the Honda Civic first went on sale in the US in 1973, it was a tiny 3-door hatchback capitalizing on concerns arising out of the OPEC Oil Embargo. In other words, it was a safe and smart choice during a period of unrest and uncertainty. Eventually though, years after oil pipelines once again gushed with plentiful crude, hatchbacks became synonymous with economic despair. Judgmental types assumed you couldn’t afford anything better, and soon few people wanted them anymore. Today, hatchbacks are making comebacks, and the 2020 Honda Civic Hatchback is a good example of why.

2021 Honda Civic Reviews Summary

Honda is ready to retire the 10th-generation Civic, one of the groundbreaking versions in the nameplate's long and storied history. From its polarizing design and three body styles to the arrival (finally!) of the Type R performance variant in the U.S. market, this version of the Civic made its mark. And even though the design is now six years old, and the car is ubiquitous on American roads, the 2021 Honda Civic remains worthy of consideration.
No video found
Popular Features & Specs

Engine

1.5L 174 hp I4

Engine

2.0L 158 hp I4

Drive Train

FWD

Drive Train

FWD

Seating Capacity

5

Seating Capacity

5

Horsepower

174 hp @ 6000 rpm

Horsepower

158 hp @ 6500 rpm

MPG City

31

MPG City

30

MPG Highway

40

MPG Highway

38
2020 Honda Civic Hatchback
2020 Honda Civic Hatchback
$21,750MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2021 Honda Civic
2021 Honda Civic
$21,250MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2020 Honda Civic Hatchback
$21,750MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now
2021 Honda Civic
$21,250MSRP
Overview
Overview
OverviewShop Now

CarGurus highlights

Winning Vehicle Image

According to CarGurus experts, the overall rating for the 2020 Honda Civic Hatchback is 7.7 out of 10, while the 2021 Honda Civic scores 7.2 out of 10. Based on these ratings, the 2020 Honda Civic Hatchback emerges as the better choice, offering a more versatile and modern package, balancing performance, comfort, and technology features effectively.

Choose the 2021 Honda Civic if:

Shop Now
7.2of 10overall
  • You need a car with comprehensive safety ratings, including a Top Safety Pick for the Touring trim and five stars from the NHTSA.
  • You prefer a broader choice of trim levels, each offering unique features and amenities specific to your needs.
  • You're looking for a fuel-efficient sedan with modern infotainment including Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, especially in higher trims.
Overview
MSRP
$21,750
$21,250
Average price
$22,467
$21,502
Listings
Ratings & Reviews
User reviews
4.6
4.9
Expert reviews

7.7 out of 10

Read full review

7.2 out of 10

Read full review
Pros & cons
Pros
  • Stylish design
  • Fun to drive
Cons
  • Outdated technology
Pros
  • Stylish design
  • Multiple body styles
  • Fun to drive
Cons
  • Underwhelming base engine
  • Outdated technology
  • Interior materials feel cheap
Summary
When the Honda Civic first went on sale in the US in 1973, it was a tiny 3-door hatchback capitalizing on concerns arising out of the OPEC Oil Embargo. In other words, it was a safe and smart choice during a period of unrest and uncertainty. Eventually though, years after oil pipelines once again gushed with plentiful crude, hatchbacks became synonymous with economic despair. Judgmental types assumed you couldn’t afford anything better, and soon few people wanted them anymore. Today, hatchbacks are making comebacks, and the 2020 Honda Civic Hatchback is a good example of why.
Honda is ready to retire the 10th-generation Civic, one of the groundbreaking versions in the nameplate's long and storied history. From its polarizing design and three body styles to the arrival (finally!) of the Type R performance variant in the U.S. market, this version of the Civic made its mark. And even though the design is now six years old, and the car is ubiquitous on American roads, the 2021 Honda Civic remains worthy of consideration.
Video
No video found
Popular Features & Specs
Engine
1.5L 174 hp I4
2.0L 158 hp I4
Drive Train
FWD
FWD
Seating Capacity
5
5
Horsepower
174 hp @ 6000 rpm
158 hp @ 6500 rpm
MPG City
31
30
MPG Highway
40
38
Look and feel
2020 Honda Civic Hatchback
7/10
2021 Honda Civic
8/10
Half a decade ago, Honda redesigned the Civic, positioning it against competitors like the Subaru Impreza and Toyota Corolla. The response to this redesign was mixed; some found the bold styling challenging to get used to, and it required viewing from the right angle and light to truly appreciate. For the 2020 model year, Honda made subtle adjustments to its Civic Hatchback's appearance. The large faux air intakes were toned down with body-color crossbars, the grille was refreshed, and the headlights acquired a smoked look. New wheel designs were introduced too, although the previous ones were already well received. The test model, a top-of-the-line Sport Touring edition, gleamed in Platinum White Pearl paint. This provided a striking contrast with the car’s glossy black detailing, drawing compliments from onlookers. The interior boasted stitched leather on the steering wheel, soft-touch materials, and high-quality finishes, although it still had a fair share of hard plastics typical of mainstream compact cars. Despite that, closing the door with a bank-vault thunk and experiencing the immediate ambient noise reduction left a lasting impression. One standout feature for 2020 was the availability of a six-speed manual gearbox in the Sport Touring trim, previously reserved only for the Sport trim. This added tactile driving pleasure and brought the price to $28,980, including the destination charge from the factory in the UK. While the price might seem high, it was significantly less expensive than the Civic Type R, and Honda's pricing spectrum also meant you didn’t need to break the bank to own one. The base LX trim started at $21,650, with the Sport at $22,750, the EX at $24,150, and the leather-appointed EX-L at $25,350. Reflecting on the Honda Civic’s history, it was clear that significant redesigns arrived roughly every decade. Past iterations in 1984, 1992, 2006, and 2016 each set new benchmarks for the compact car segment. In anticipation of the upcoming 2022 model, Honda presented its concept as a scaled-down Accord, stepping away from drastically redefining the segment again. For the 2021 model year, Honda sold the Civic in four-door sedan, five-door hatchback, and performance-tuned Type R formats. However, the two-door coupe was discontinued, and the manual transmission also disappeared from the sedan lineup, awaiting the next generation. Reviewing the sedan version, the lineup included LX, Sport, EX, EX-L, and Touring trims, with prices ranging from $21,250 to $28,300, excluding the $995 destination fee. Our test car was a Touring sedan finished in Cosmic Blue Metallic paint, adding an extra $395 to the total cost, bringing it to $29,690. Though the styling of the 10th-generation Civic drew polarizing opinions when it debuted, it had become familiar with over a million units on the road. The Touring trim with its eye-catching paint and 18-inch wheels presented a handsome appearance from the right angles but sometimes left one wondering. The interior, innovative and adventurous in 2016, started to show its age, especially in the infotainment department. Despite this, it maintained quality materials, distinct design, and thoughtful detailing, holding on to its trend-setter legacy.
Performance
2020 Honda Civic Hatchback
9/10
2021 Honda Civic
7/10
Driving the 2020 Honda Civic Hatchback, particularly in the Sport or Sport Touring trims, didn't mimic the performance of the Civic Si. While both shared a turbocharged 1.5-liter four-cylinder engine, the Hatchback’s outputs were distinct. The base engine produced 174 horsepower for LX, EX, and EX-L trims, while the Sport and Sport Touring trims enjoyed a boost to 180 horsepower. Torque for these models measured 162 lb-ft from 1,700 rpm to 5,500 rpm with a CVT, and 177 lb-ft from 1,900 rpm to 5,000 rpm with the manual transmission. This engine provided ample power for the front-wheel-drive Civic Hatchback, characterized by its quiet, refined, and well-mannered nature. However, the transmission’s long clutch travel and gear throws distinguished it from the tighter, tauter Civic Si, which also benefited from a helical limited-slip differential. Where the Civic Si focused on spirited driving, the Civic Hatchback Sport and Sport Touring trims offered a more balanced, daily-driving experience. They provided a softer, more compliant ride with wider seats, a quieter cabin, and a subdued exhaust. Despite these qualities, they still delivered an enjoyable drive down winding roads, albeit with less grip and composure than the Si. Regarding fuel economy, the test car rated by the EPA at 32 mpg in combined driving, achieved 32.7 mpg on a testing loop, even under spirited driving conditions. In 2021, the Honda Civic offered a choice between a naturally aspirated 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine or a turbocharged 1.5-liter four-cylinder engine. The base 2.0-liter engine, offered in LX and Sport trims, produced 158 horsepower and 138 lb-ft of torque, paired with a CVT that drove the front wheels. For many, this powertrain was satisfactory unless experiencing a turbocharged variant. The turbocharged 1.5-liter engine, standard in EX, EX-L, and Touring trims, provided 174 horsepower and a more robust 162 lb-ft of torque from a low 1,700 rpm to 5,500 rpm. This engine added verve to the Civic’s driving experience. While a manual or dual-clutch transmission could have enhanced the fun-to-drive factor, the CVT left much to be desired, especially with its droning characteristic and unsatisfactory paddle shifters. Despite the transmission's flaws, the Civic's fuel economy was commendable. The test Touring model averaged 34.8 mpg over a 140-mile driving loop, exceeding the EPA's 33 mpg estimate for combined driving.
Form and function
2020 Honda Civic Hatchback
8/10
2021 Honda Civic
8/10
Consumer preferences leaned towards SUVs despite their higher costs, increased weight, and less aerodynamic design, leading to higher fuel consumption. However, the 2020 Honda Civic Hatchback presented a strong case for compact cars. With 25.2 cubic feet of cargo space, the Civic Hatchback held a slight edge over the HR-V's 23.2 cubic feet. While the HR-V offered 57.6 cubic feet of maximum volume compared to the Civic's 46.2 cubic feet, the hatchback compensated with better acceleration and superior fuel efficiency. The Civic Hatchback's seating position was low, making entry and exit slightly challenging compared to the HR-V. However, once settled into the Sport Touring's heated leather front seats, with excellent thigh support for the driver, comfort was undeniable, though the passenger would welcome a height adjuster. Honda’s center console storage was another highlight, offering depth and configurability for various items, including oversized water bottles. Rear seat comfort was surprisingly good, although the lack of air-conditioning vents and dark-tinted rear glass could make long rides uncomfortable. The 2021 Honda Civic sedan sat low, translating into a seating position that demanded some effort to get into and out of, which some might find beneficial as part of daily exercise. Once inside, comfort ruled, unless it was a sweltering day, as the rear seats lacked air-conditioning vents. The driver's seat in most trims offered eight-way power adjustment, making it easy to find a comfortable position. However, the front passenger seat lacked a height adjuster, impacting ease of access and comfort. Despite the low seating, the Civic sedan’s interior space remained ample, reminiscent of midsize cars from a decade ago. Adults could comfortably fit in the rear seats, which offered excellent thigh support and a well-angled backrest. The center console stood out for its practicality, featuring various trays and compartments to accommodate everyday essentials. The trunk space measured 15.1 cubic feet, slightly reduced to 14.7 cubic feet in the Touring trim due to the premium sound system’s subwoofer.
Technology
2020 Honda Civic Hatchback
8/10
2021 Honda Civic
5/10
Front-seat passengers in the 2020 Civic Hatchback were greeted by a stylish dashboard, with digital instrumentation and a 7-inch touchscreen infotainment system starting from the EX trim. The system included Bluetooth and a volume knob, although it lacked a tuning knob and voice-recognition technology. The Sport Touring trim enhanced the tech offering with Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, satellite radio, text-messaging support, a navigation system, a quick-charging USB port, and a 12-speaker premium sound system. The automatic climate control system and Smart Entry with Walk Away Auto Lock added convenience, though it wasn’t a tech powerhouse. Tech-wise, the 2021 Honda Civic showed its age, especially at the lower end of the spectrum. The base LX model offered a minimal tech setup with a 5-inch LCD screen, Bluetooth, and a slow-charging USB port. The Sport trim added a much-needed upgrade with a 7-inch high-definition touchscreen, eight-speaker sound system, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, text-messaging support, and a faster USB port. The EX trim brought HD Radio and satellite radio, while the Touring trim featured navigation, digital traffic, and a 10-speaker premium audio system. Despite these upgrades, the Civic’s voice recognition system in the Touring trim was unsophisticated, often falling short compared to user-friendly Apple CarPlay or Android Auto systems.
Safety
2020 Honda Civic Hatchback
7/10
2021 Honda Civic
7/10
Every 2020 Honda Civic Hatchback came equipped with the Honda Sensing suite. This included forward-collision warning with automatic emergency braking, lane-departure warning, lane-keeping assist, adaptive cruise control with low-speed follow capability, automatic high beams, and Road Departure Mitigation. The Civic Hatchback also featured LaneWatch for right-side blind-spot monitoring, displaying a video feed on the infotainment screen when the right turn signal was activated. However, it lacked a traditional blind-spot monitoring system and rear cross-traffic alert. The car earned top marks for crash-test performance but missed out on the IIHS Top Safety Pick due to poor headlight ratings. Honda equipped every 2021 Civic with Honda Sensing, the company’s suite of driving assistance systems. This included adaptive cruise control with stop-and-go capability, forward-collision warning, automatic emergency braking, lane-departure warning, lane-keeping assist, Road Departure Mitigation, and automatic high beams. LaneWatch remained part of the offering for EX trims and above, but with similar limitations as in the 2020 model. The Civic lacked a traditional radar-based blind-spot warning system and rear cross-traffic alert. Though Honda Sensing was effective, it wasn’t as refined as competitors, causing abrupt and indecisive behavior in traffic. However, the 2021 Civic earned a Top Safety Pick designation from the IIHS for the Touring trim, and a five-star rating from the NHTSA in all assessments.
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By: CarGurus + AI

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