2020 Dodge Challenger Review

Challenger

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2020 Dodge Challenger Overview

Since Dodge resurrected the Challenger 12 years ago, it has given its signature pony car several minor updates and several massive boosts in performance. For 2020, there are no major changes to report. Challenger trims include SXT, GT, R/T, R/T Scat Pack, SRT Hellcat, and SRT Hellcat Redeye. Prices range from modest to moderately expensive, and performance ranges from entertaining to downright exhilarating.

The range starts with a 3.6-liter V6 in the SXT and GT versions. It makes 305 horsepower and 268 pound-feet of torque, driven through an 8-speed automatic to either the rear wheels or optional all-wheel drive (AWD). For those who can’t live without a V8, the Challenger R/T gets a 5.7-liter unit with 375 horsepower and 410 lb-ft of torque. The R/T comes standard with a 6-speed manual, and an 8-speed automatic is available.

The R/T Scat Pack gets a 6.4-liter V8 with 485 hp and 476 lb-ft of torque and will do 0-60 mph in 4.4 seconds. If 485 hp doesn’t sound like enough, then look to the 717-hp SRT Hellcat and its 6.2-liter supercharged engine. The Hellcat gets to 60 mph in 3.5 seconds, and it shifts through either a 6-speed manual or 8-speed automatic. King of the hill is the SRT Hellcat Redeye, which makes 797 hp. The Redeye comes with only the 8-speed auto and will do a quarter-mile in under 11 seconds.

For fuel economy, V6 versions get up to 23 mpg combined. Hellcats are predictably very thirsty with an EPA rating of 13 mpg city, 21 highway, and 16 combined.

At least in the front, all versions of the Challenger are roomy, and the seats are comfortable enough for long trips. The rear seats are on the small side, but the 16.2 cubic feet of trunk space is impressive. Base Challengers get dual-zone climate control, power-adjustable seats, and a 7-inch touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. Stepping up the range adds more high-quality materials and a larger 8.4-inch touchscreen.

Given that it’s an older design (much older than most other cars on the road), the Challenger doesn’t come with the kind of active safety features that some buyers may expect from a new car in 2020. Other than a reversing camera, optional features include adaptive cruise control, blind-spot monitoring, and forward-collision warning. The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) gave the Challenger a 4-star overall rating, but in Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) testing, the Challenger scored only Marginal in the small front-overlap test and Acceptable in the rollover and head restraints categories.

A full-size coupe with retro styling, the Challenger is also a comfortable, usable car that just so happens to offer crazy amounts of performance. Even after all these years, it is still one of the best speed bargains on the market.

Updated

Since 2012, Andrew Newton has been writing about cars both old and new. Andrew has been an associate editor at Sport Car Digest as well as a contributor to sites like BoldRide and JamesEdition. He was also the Education Manager at the Larz Anderson Auto Museum in Brookline, MA before becoming the Auction Editor at Hagerty Classic Car Insurance. He currently splits his time behind the wheel between his NA Miata, 1994 Corvette, and Triumph TR6.

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