What is a normal life span for a Porche 911 or a Boxer

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Asked by Jan 23, 2016 at 10:56 AM about the 2000 Porsche 911 Carrera Convertible

Question type: Maintenance & Repair

I've gotten intrigued about owning a Porsche.  However, the newer low mileage ones are out of my price range, but those about 10-15 years old with 60,000+ miles are not.  I've heard a Porsche engine is good to 300,000 miles or so, with proper maintenance.  Is that true?

9 Answers

28,465

Yes, they can go to 200 or 300k miles with proper prevenitve maintenace. Probly one of the most important parts is to get a PPI = Pre Purchase Inspection which can be done tugh your local Porsche deal or Porsche indy mechanic. The key to all water cooled Porsches is the IMS bearing which should be replaced at the same as the clutch. IMS bearing failure can destory the motor and have been known to give out at random mileage intervals. It is a good idea to replace the IMS as soon as possible for a peace of mind. There are serveral aftermarket bearing but if I where to replace it I would use the direct oil feed bearing. Other than that they are amazing cars and you can get some great deals on used porsches. Here is a pic of the direct oil feed IMS bearing. Good Luck with your purchase!

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30

They can run for a while but definitely do not buy one with that amount of miles.

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15

Only &5 of the 996-motors years 1999 to 2005 had IMS Failure. If you have one with high mileage its probably ok. But when you do a clutch jo get the IMS and RMS done while you are in there. But get an AWD 911 for the real Porsche experience. There is a 2000 Millennium for sale in TN for $17,300. Its high mileage but the car is loaded and listed for $89,765.00 when new.

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2,290

Like any precision machine, maintenance is key. Maintenance records should be available. Except for electronic issues, I do all maintenance. If you can change brake pads, then you'll find a Porsche is no different than most cars. Stay away from "Stealerships", they will rip you off big time. I have changed the IMS bearing in my 2000 996 convertible for peace of mind when doing the clutch. Great cars, and 200k is entirely realistic, and if you can turn a wrench and change your oil, get a Porsche race shop to inspect it. You will absolutely cherish moment behind the wheel. Good luck!

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2,185

I don't agree with HunterTaylor. The most reliable Porsches I have owned (I have had more than 30) were ones that averaged at least 6-9k miles per year. The most unreliable were the garage queens that barely moved. I had a 20k mile 14 year old 996 and that was just one long string of problems, whereas my 180k mile 996 Turbo did another 60k miles without a single problem. The highest mileage 911 I owned was still going strong when I sold it at 370,000 miles

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Yea Andrew I'm not the most Porsche savvy person so you're. Probably a better source. Just my feelings on miles.

10

You must read these: http://www.oregonpca.org/resources/ims-bearing-the-full-story/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2008/11/wild-ass-rumor-of-the-day-porsche-boxster-engine-failures/ My 2008 Boxster S RS60 suffered IMS Failure @ 71,000 miles and original clutch. Find a car with the fix in place. Other issues with M96/M97 engines are cylinder wall "D" Chunk Failure and Rod Cap Bolt Elongation. 2009 and newer do not appear to have the IMS issue.

1 people found this helpful.

Porsche engines will run basically forever. Issue is IMS bearing failure on the 99 to 05 year engines. Make sure any Carrera or Boxster you purchase has had the update ($2500- 3000) performed or you could be looking at a catastrophic failure of the engine. Other than that updates like stereo systems are difficult if you are a sound buff, as there really isn't much room in the car for a sub to match what the newer cars bass is. Those teardrop headlamps are readily available to replace, but can be $2500 a piece. Other than that the car is resilient and good to go. Just get one that has already had these things addressed.

You can easily get 200-300k out of a water-cooled Porsche. I've owned 3 and I do all of my own maintenance. Keep the oil changed and monitor your fluids and you'll be fine. I currently have a 2000 Boxter S that I bought with 70k miles on it, and I am now crossing 130k and it runs like it did the first day I bought it. If you really want a kick in the pants, put in a lightened flywheel and racing clutch. I did it myself and now its really a rocket. They're great cars, especially if you have the wherewithal to do at least some of the maintenance.

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