hi i'm looking at buying a 2006 subaru outback 3.0 Ll bean edition (h6)-it has almost 120,000 miles-asking 9900-my questions what maintenace repairs are coming up-how much money would i put into it

Asked by May 03, 2016 at 03:15 PM about the 2006 Subaru Outback 3.0 R L.L. Bean Edition Wagon

Question type: Maintenance & Repair

63 Answers

22,335

YES, go for it. There's no timing belt to worry about since it's an H6, but, I would definitely have the head gaskets checked thoroughly.. Also, checked out the water pump and condition of the radiator.. If you need to replace the water pump, radiator or thermostat, make sure that they are FACTORY SUBARU genuine parts, not aftermarket. Good luck. http://www.carcomplaints.com/Subaru/Outback/2006

1 of 1 people found this helpful.
5,710

Mark, that's such bullshit! There are myriad items that plague eleven year old OBs! M. Beaujacques, PLEASE take this chariot to a sesoned Subie pro for a thorough analysis. Sheesh....

5,710

Sorry, Mark---don't mean to be mean, but radiators and water pumps are the LEAST of the common problems with these old-timers.

22,335

Ernie, there you go again, just slinging the gloom and doom painting dark clouds on the horizon. 2006 is not that old of a car, 10 years. And, yes, it's all condition. You're presuming that the person looking at this car seriously can't evaluate the overall physical condition of the car...of course they should have it looked at, but, 120,000 miles is completely normal mileage. Hell, your offering to sell someone a 2011 car with 99,000 miles? And, you don't know this car or what region it's in! If it's a California vehicle, I can tell you that it's in MUCH BETTER condition than any vehicle in NEW ENGLAND. By the way, you don't put much stake in "Car Complaints" do you?

1 of 1 people found this helpful.
22,335

Ernie, by the way, did you even read the point I made about checking out the head gaskets, that would require an inspection of the car....

1 of 1 people found this helpful.
22,335

Ernie, why is the 2006 Subaru Outback on this list of "best vehicles"? Do you really think you have all the answers??? http://www.carcomplaints.com/best_vehicles/

1 of 1 people found this helpful.
22,335

beaujacques, why don't you take a look at this thread, there's a guy making comments about his 2007 Subaru Outback with over 250,000 miles.. You've got to take all these comments with a grain of salt..... Do I think you should get the car you're considering checked out, YES.... But, I'm sure you're not looking at a "beater"... Make your own decisions, and realize that there's a legion of people out there with high mileage Subaru cars..... Discussion is at the bottom of this post... See this, http://www.subaruhighmileageclub.com/miles200000.html www.cargurus.com/Cars/Discussion-c21664_ds686183

3 of 3 people found this helpful.
22,335

beaujacques- I'm no mechanic, but, I can tell you from experience, there's nothing cheaper than just fixing an old car compared to purchasing new or late model vehicles.... Look at it this way, most new cars are $400 per month for 60 months or more for five years... That's over $5,000 per year... I can assure you that you won't have $5,000 a year in repairs every year.... That's why I kept my old car for 19 years.....

2 of 2 people found this helpful.
5,710

Decaf, Grasshopper.

I have a 2006 Subaru with 196,000 and the head gasket just blew. I want to try to keep, but repair estimates are about $1500 to $2000. The car is good on its exterior but I don't know how long the engine will last after it is repaired.

5,710

The odds are pretty good that the motor will troop on as new after a careful HG reseal. Just be sure to have a competent machine shop test and flatten the heads and an experienced wrench torque them carefully. Throw in a fresh t-belt but the water pump and t-stat are probably ok. Change the ATF while you're at it to protect the tranny. Good luck.

1 of 1 people found this helpful.
22,335

Chanchito-. You mentioned that your car is "good" on the exterior.... How's the interior coach of your car?? This is pretty important... If you plan on keeping your car another 10 years, you probably want the seats, carpeting and dashboard to look pretty good as well.. I'm​ going to presume that you are the original owner... ? Or, how long have you actually owned this car.. 196,000 miles is quite an achievement, that's almost 20,000 miles per year.... You must drive it pretty often..? Or, maybe you recently acquired this car? Pride of ownership for an older car that is in pristine condition is a really​ high factor especially if you decide to put a significant amount of money into fixing it up... If the car is basically a beater inside with ripped seats, worn carpet or torn headliner,. I would think twice before doing anything significant... When Ernie says it will keep going, I wonder how long this might be... Another 100,000 miles... That's five more years if you continue driving it at the present rate. The engine may go that distance, but, the transmission ?? I would not count on that.. by the way, take a really hard look at the age of the water pump, thermostat and radiator?? You don't want one of these single point of failures to stop your car ...IF you are already paying for the labor, which is the most expensive part of the job ... while they're in there, consider these other very important components... You'll save yourself the money doing it all at once and be done with it..

1 of 1 people found this helpful.
22,335

Chanchito- ONE more important item, even if you were to do all the things I suggested, it would still be less expensive than buying a new car.

1 of 1 people found this helpful.
79,635

Maybe cheaper than a new car but it may be worth a lot less than it costs to fix.

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79,635

Gimee a S, Gimmee a U, Gimme a B...................

5,710

To repeat: water pumps and t-stats are life-long Subie components; to "take a hard look" at their age is meaningless. Similarly, the radiator condition is easily physically observed...and they're cheap in any event. Yeah, Grasshopper: "...gimmee an A...gimme a R...." PLEASE STOP pretending you know anything about servicing requirements!

1 of 1 people found this helpful.
22,335

Ernie, you know what..... YES, it's true..I'm not a mechanic, but, I know people who are and I have very good resources... You can believe what you want.. I'm a little more "proactive" about system failures. I'm​ NOT trying to squeeze the last mile out of a system so, yes, I err on the side of caution.. IF I even suspect that something is about to fail or it's too old... many times I've​ replaced things before there was an actual problem... Case in point, I have a vehicle with six plus years old tires... but, the tread looked fine... I replaced all of them with brand new tires.. You spend your money the way you want.... but, it's your clients that call the shots .. and your advice is an OPINION .. that's it.. SO, when you tell people to SKIP IT.. I hope you realize that when they break down somewhere in the middle of nowhere... they won't have fond memories of what you told them...

79,635

Mark, all you offer are second hand opinions that you read on the web somewhere. If you want to over maintain your car to buy peace of mind then go ahead. Kind of like your extended warranty that you bought and did not use.

22,335

These are NOT second hand opinions.. far from it... The reality is we have taken many road trips.. several across country to many remote places... and I don't want breakdowns In these situations. As far as my car is concerned, the extended warranty was all of $500 over 36 months, really nothing to speak of.. Insurance is the shifting of risk... There's a myriad of things that could happen... The fact that it didn't is just not an argument NOT to have it.. AND, the reason I purchased a certified pre-owned vehicle is that I wanted everything working from the start... something you have said many times you would do... I don't collect cars..I actually drive them and​ expect them to be fully functional and in top condition all the time..I can rely on that , which​ means that my cars are "road ready" if I need to take them out of town... SO, if that means that I put a few more dollars into this, so be it... You can make your own decisions.... AND, when it comes time to sell my cars, they go pretty quickly..I keep all my records and receipts.. people really like that....

5,710

If you can get another 3yrs powertrain for $500 on that OB of yours that'd be a good deal if it absolutely covers your CVT and motor internal valve guides.Otherwise I have to agree with FOR, Grasshopper.

5,710

My recs are based on statistical risk that is highly confident based on several thousand Subies I've fully serviced...PLUS anecdotal tracking of many tens of thousands my peers and I discuss. Prophylaxis makes sense only when guided by knowledge. Otherwise it's expensive; reminds me of the guy who used TWO condoms in high school.

1 of 1 people found this helpful.
79,635

That is your choice Mark. You clearly need to buy peace of mind. I made my choices and have both peace of mind and a nice pile of cash to show for it. I did get an extended warranty on my Forester of Doom at no cost to me.

22,335

F_O_R and Ernie-- Well, I can see we're never going to see eye to eye on these issues... Let me put this another way... By purchasing certified pre-owned vehicles...I'm saving a whole lot of cash up front on the depreciation .. it's very significant... Usually 28 to 30 percent.. savings. SO, when I pay for a few extras, like the certification, extended warranty and whatever I'm doing, it usually will be a greater savings than buying a brand new car... I used​ to buy brand new cars until a friend told me how good the lease returns were ... Let's agree to disagree and leave it at that.

5,710

Lease residuals are a crap shoot that's organized by the manufacturers' banking divisions predicting financials over future valuations. Sometimes they make money...and sometimes they don't. What can't be forecast is the condition of the product at the end of each experimental session. Hedging one's individual bet with costly insurance is a relatively expensive option to lessen risk...but perhaps is reasonable under certain circumstances, such as when the product's prognosis is impossible (young model), or condition is masked by an erroneous "certification" cloud. Indeed, it can be tough for mortals...and Grasshoppers.

Thank you all for your advice and opinions! It turns out that the repair shops estimates are about $2300 plus taxes for the head gasket and engine reseal work on our current 2006 engine with 178,000 miles. The other options is to get another engine with 108,000 miles and install it -- the estimate for that is $2650 plus taxes. The repair shop is saying the engine replacement will be easier and last longer. I will let them know to look into the transmission belt. I will also have them check the water pump, thermostat, radiator. What is an ATF? Yes, we are the original owners and the interior and exterior are in good condition (no interior tears or exterior dents). Thanks for the advice.

22,335

Chanchito- YES, great thinking... I purchased my Subaru Outback Limited a little more than 3 years ago.... It was a certified pre-owned vehicle... from an established "dealership that sells new cars... that's really the best place to look for a clean used car... Good luck.

79,635

How does paying more for a car reduce depreciation? Once you drive the car off the lot it is no longer "certified", all you have is the warranty but after 3- 4 years or so the car would be worth the same as an identical car that was not certified.

5,710

"3-4 years" is awfully generous, to boot.

1 of 1 people found this helpful.
79,635

I always laugh when private parties sell "certified" cars that they bought and are now selling as if it means anything at all. Sort of like selling a used car as "new".

5,710

W.C. Fields said it best a long time ago....

22,335

Mr. Regrets- privately sold cars are NOT certified, you should know better ...as far as depreciation goes, the steepest curve is in the first two to three years.. they all depreciate for a very long time... UNLESS they become classic cars like your 62 Jaguar... not too many cars fall into this category ... only dealerships certify cars and there's a standard procedure for that. Used cars are sold as is, but, it helps to have records, receipts, and a proven timetable for maintenance ... all of this adds value and gives the prospective buyers more confidence in selecting a used car ... I've sold many used cars and they've all been in EXCELLENT mechanical condition.. I only sell or trade cars for performance, function and safety issues... Old cars are generally less safe than newer models.. As cool as your old 62 Jaguar is, it's not a particularly safe car by modern standards... SO, when I said that there's a significant costs savings by purchasing a three years old vehicle, the savings from the sales price is around 30% , the sales tax, registration, and insurance is all less expensive .. that's an instant discount right from the beginning.. plus, the car depreciates more slowly in years 4 to 12... it's simple arithmetic.

22,335

That's 30% from what you would have paid for the same make and model brand new....

79,635

People claim certification in an attempt to get more for their cars based on past certification.

22,335

I'm only going to say this one more time.....private party folks cannot "certify" used cars despite they may have purchased one.... only dealerships can certify cars.... there's normally about 152 steps to go through... yeah, laugh all you want that I purchased one....I don't care what you or you know who thinks..... I got a report when I purchased the car... everything was documented in detail ...My car was NOT sold "as is"..... I have NEVER had a single issue with the car, again, a lot of people are foolish enough not to get a good car in the first place... then complain like hell. they probably went for a "used car" dealership or auction.... you're running a bigger risk there and chances are you'll wind up with a lot of problems.... you have no one to blame but yourself. At least with a certified car, you know that everything has been inspected, reviewed and brought up to standard. Unlike the master of doom and gloom's pronouncement that someone just "waved their hands" over the car and said it was certified .... I suppose that this could happen at an unscrupulous dealership.... but, that is why you should do your homework to find a reputable dealer that has had a long standing business in the community.... the dealership I purchased my car from started their business in 1966.... that's 51 years ago and is still one of the largest and most successful new car dealerships here in Los Angeles.... they have a stellar reputation... they're not going to risk that on a certified car sale,... you can believe me or not.... good luck with your choices... I can see that your still fuming about your Subaru... too bad. . As for saving money on used cars, you bet, I recently got another car and saved 50 percent off the cost of a brand new vehicle.... show me how buying new makes sense.... it doesn't ... Everyone loves to purchase new cars.... I get that, but, if you know the value of money, it doesn't pay to do that. Most people just lease cars, they are on a perpetual rental cycle... like renting an apartment. and when they run up the mileage on a lease, they have no options... either purchase the car, pay the lease penalty costs or sign a new lease.... they usually go with the last option.

79,635

Reading comprehension problem Mark? I said people claim extra value for cars that WERE certified. I never said that the certification is transferable but people try to make it a selling point.

22,335

You inferred it when you said...that it's​ an ATTEMPT TO GET MORE MONEY for their cars based on past certification translating to justify a higher price point at the sale.....

5,710

Yes, Grasshopper, PLEASE don't say it again....

79,635

I think Mark is trying to convince himself that he made a good choice by repeating over and over.

5,710

As a budding scientist I learned to train rats and pigeons at Brown's infamous experimental pych labs. Believe me, it doesn't take more than an occasional reinforcement (like a "best post" nugget) to condition insanely repetitive operant behavior. We've all read of the rats who'd starve themselves tapping on a response paddle for their rare diminishing morsel. It doesn' take much....

We fixed our car and it's ready to go. We had to replace the thermostat and radiator for an additional $200. So total cost is about $3000 to replace engine, radiator and thermostat. The shop guarantees its work for 12,000 miles and 1 year whichever comes first. We are driving it today and I'm looking forward to keeping the car for another 5 years or so. According to KBB, the car is worth about $5000 if I were to sell it. I hope we're trouble free for a long while. :)

22,335

Chanchito- EXCELLENT choice.... enjoy...and savor that the money you're saving by NOT spending $400 per month or $4,800 annually on new car payments for 5 years is MUCH LESS than what you are doing. SO, despite what Ernie so adamantly stated about the thermostat...it needed replacing..? Ernie thinks that these components don't fail on Subarus ( LOL)... even though he's never seen your particular car.... WOW... what hubris... Let me tell you, EVERYTHING fails eventually.... Time erodes everything... Yeah, maybe they last longer and go further... but, they all fail at some point. I understand that the Subaru thermostat is designed with larger capacity for coolant bypass for greater circulation and efficiency.. I hope you followed my advice to get the original Subaru equipment part for that? See this discussion below, http://www.subaruoutback.org/forums/66-problems- maintenance/11265-subaru-thermostat-vs-market-stat.html Good job on the new radiator... bottom line is if you are diligent about keeping up with repairs before really huge problems ruin your engine, your car will go as far as you're willing to throw money at it. Your car is at the bottom end of the depreciation scale, meaning it will lose value much more slowly than anything newer. Your in the zone now for the car to start paying you back "in service" for all the years you spent paying off the vehicle. The longer you drive this the more money you're saving... I had an old 95 Honda Accord...kept it for 19 years...and with all the various repairs...saved a ton over a new vehicle...the $5,000 you just invested is the sales tax on a brand new car.. think about that....so, kudos to you... Congratulations.

1 of 1 people found this helpful.
5,710

Your 11 yr old OB will depreciate about $1k/yr ongoing. Keep it simple: do NOT invest more than $1k/yr in repairs/services ongoing. In a few years you'll donate this chariot to charity for a small tax deduction. Don't over-fertilize it in the meantime, eh? Grasshoppe: you insulting little shit! The reason they replaced the t-stat is that they were afraid to NOT do so when selling a new radiator. Yes, it's PRUDENT...but NOT necessary. Keep your lack of knowledge away from those in need. Friggin' fanboy....

1 of 1 people found this helpful.
5,710

Further: ALL the info you purport to "give" to others is sourced from us REAL mechanics on this forum or scattershot you pick up online. Passing it off as "my advice" is the height of hypocrisy, Mark. PLEASE get a life...preferably somewhere else. "Time erodes everything"...you're too much. I guess sedimentation are alternate facts, eh?

22,335

Ernie, I'm going to stand by my conservative advice for replacement of the water pump, thermostat and timing belts at regular intervals... yeah, maybe it costs more money , BUT, sooner or later it will have to be replaced anyway and I'd rather choose when to get this replaced at my own convenience rather than when the car breaks down...so, we definitely have a difference of opinion on maintaining cars.. it's very UNFORTUNATE that you have to lower yourself to profanity on these differences of opinion and style.. I am VERY cautious about keeping my cars running in absolute top condition, something I would have thought you as a mechanic who repairs cars for a living would appreciate.... after all, I'm the kind of person who brings work into shops like yours at the drop of a hat to ensure that I'm always at full power on the road.... You should know that there's a legion of people out there like me who do everything we can to avoid calling the AAA roadside assistance for breakdowns..it's the last thing I want to do.... You have said many times that the T-STAT on the Subaru is practically a lifetime part... I'm sure it's good....but lifetime??? These are NOT alternative facts...cars breakdown..you of all people should know that since you fix them.... Let me tell you something else... I replace tires every 6 years, batteries every 4 to 5 years, and other parts routinely... I have routinely said that it's a good thing to replace the timing belts and water pump..and I've read many articles online about the importance of using the Subaru original equipment parts... whenever I can I use original parts... again, more expensive..it's only money.... besides, fixing the car is always less expensive than getting a new car...how many times have I told people that....as far as them being afraid not to replace these parts, I completely disagree..they were wise to do so... stop making people feel bad about the choices they've made...you can make your own decisions..

79,635

You complain about vulgarity when you push that fouled mouth cretin down under as a expert? Really Mark?

22,335

I'm NOT the one making the remarks... someone else is... As I said BEFORE, the guy in Australia is RUDE.... Ernie is just trying to make it personal, in poor taste and vindictive...big difference. One more thing Ernie...you have the benefit of knowing how to fix your cars.... great skill.. not all of us have that luxury.. The rest of us have to rely on people like yourself and trust our mechanic... IF I were one of your customers bringing my car in for repairs, I seriously doubt that you would talk with me and make disparaging comments no matter what my questions or concerns were?

79,635

You do know this is a forum for people that know how to fix cars? ;)

22,335

F_O_R-. Really... I thought this forum was a way for people to share ideas and experiences...

22,335

F_O_R- where did you get that idea???

22,335

Chanchito - by the way..no matter what anyone tells you..it's always less expensive to repair than replace your car... let me put this into perspective for you.... I drove my 1995 Honda Accord for 14 years after I paid it off purchased brand new...car payments are about $5,000 per year... fourteen years at $5,000 is a savings of $70,000. Seventy thousand dollars will pay for a lot of repairs....the most expensive thing is to perpetually buy or lease new cars.... think about that... you're money ahead...way ahead even if you were to fix everything ...

1 of 1 people found this helpful.
5,710

Grasshopper, the BIG problem is that you know NOTHING, but pretend to pass off your blindness as experienced knowledge. That's the mark (npi) of a charlatan poseur. Bravado and naivete don't give you the standing to offer your "opinions" as equally valuable "preferences" because you throw money around unnecessarily because you're unskilled. And NO, this is not a forum for "sharing ideas" about HOW to service vehicles from non-experts. Your flagrant diarhheatic style only fools some of the people some of the time. Please stop this awful pretense.

79,635

Always cheaper Mark? That may be - up to a point. Once the engine and transmission goes you could equal or exceed the price of a new economy car with the repair costs and when you are done spending all that money you just have an old car.

22,335

F_O_R- that's an interesting perspective coming from a guy who owns a 1962 Jaguar..and has kept it for as long as you have... although, it's collectible value made it worth doing... still, an old car... Not everyone wants to drive an old car...as you have said many times, the car was too valuable and too risky to drive every day... My point is... Sure, you will have repairs on an old car.. BUT, even with a new transmission, engine and other parts...it will NEVER rise to the level of $50,000 in repairs... never.. Look, I saved a lot of money driving older cars... No car payments for 15 years....that is a huge savings.... AND, these cars were frequently driven many cases out of town on road trips... The money was better invested somewhere else. No one needs a new car every 5 or even 8 years.... marketing people would like you to believe that... maybe after 12 or 15 years.. different story. By NOT spending all this money on new cars, I was able to have money set aside for repairs... Look at it this way... having cars costs money..you either spend it on newer cars in the form of car payments or you pay for repairs.. either way, it's going to cost something... depreciation is a really big cost factor, so every time you charge out for a new model, the cost is enormous.

22,335

Ernie, there you go again with your personal insults and name calling..my name is Mark..why don't you try using it... .".. the BIG problem is that you know NOTHING, but pretend to pass off your blindness as experienced knowledge..." As for my knowledge of cars, of course, I never said I was an expert..or mechanic.. BUT, I've owned many cars and have had life experiences with them over 49 years, owned my first car at 16... Let me put it this way...you don't know what I know..and I've managed to have a lot of cars are made them last a very long time being very careful and prudent ...I can't say this enough...I don't make "unnecessary repairs"... I consult with my mechanic and have a great business relationship with them to avoid problems...the real problem here is that you don't appreciate how I've been able to make the cars I'm had last as long as you would expect...by being proactive... fixing things BEFORE there were major issues.. AND, by postponing getting a new replacement car and driving the older models with repairs, I've actually saved money in the long run... People don't have to "trade up"to a newer car... UNLESS they want better safety features... that's a big exception... Older cars are less safe...no question.

22,335

FOR----you wrote................................................................................ "Once the engine and transmission goes you could equal or exceed the price of a new economy car"...why did you bring that up... I wasn't under the impression that the Subaru Outback or Forester were "economy cars". We're NOT talking about economy cars ....were talking about fixing a much more substantial automobile.

1 of 1 people found this helpful.
79,635

Heaven forbid that I suggest that Mark's idol is what it is. Take a Valium Mark.

5,710

A 3500lb AWD elevated wagon decently outfitted for $26k? That's an economy car. It could've been more substantial, especially with better choices for metallurgy, better suspension, and more durable engineering, but Toyoburu absolutely insists on building to a price point, durability be damned. It's interesting to note that,,,never mind...this story is better saved for a separate thread about how companies are affected by ownership changes and growth curves.

79,635

I wonder if Subaru could sell an upscale, quality car or is the name too inextricably tied to the economy image? Maybe if they spin off a Lexus type subsidiary.

22,335

F_O_R-. SO.. Subaru Outbacks are "economy cars" as far as you're concerned...I guess if your benchmark is a Jaguar...then maybe you have a point.... Bottom line is everything is relative... Wonder what that makes the Chevy Spark.. around $13,000.. ? As adjusted for inflation...a VW from the early 70s selling brand new for $2,250 .. would be the equivalent of $13,000 today...the VW was truly an economy car like the Spark.... By the way... while I like the Subaru..it's not my best car... I have others... really don't give a damn when you think... I could easily consider selling it if it started to cause me problems....so far, it's been very reliable...

79,635

Your record of infatuation with Subaru is well established Mark.

5,710

SO Grasshopper may hop away?

52,625

LOL @ Guru. Totally agree with you evaluation of Mr. Mark O. Weiner!

5,710

Re: luxury spinoff I think SOA is too busy with growing pains to be able to market a better vehicle. The "global platform" starting with the '17 Imp in Indiana should do well...but again essentially giving away AWD in a crowded economy market of FWD compact toys. I just wish they'd stop cost-cutting essential components like their nice-feeling CVTs....

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