What is the point of locking lug nuts if you still have to break off the other nuts to get the wheel loose?

10

Asked by Apr 20, 2013 at 12:45 PM

Question type: Maintenance & Repair

13 Answers

27,905

the locking nut takes a special socket. The other take any socket of whatever size they are. so people cant go buy a 5 dollar socket and take all your lug nuts off and steal your wheel.

Best Answer
99,235

There has to be more to that story. Locking lugs don't really lock - they have a special wrench to turn them. Regular lugs use a regular socket. Lugs normally don't get broken off to remove.

2 of 2 people found this helpful.
27,905

yeah hopefully he didnt mean break off, but break loose.

27,905

They make kits called wheel lock kits and as described one lug nut is different than the rest and take a special socket to fit it. It screw on the threads normally and is tightend to the same torque as the rest. Nothing special here just a good idea if you live in a city where you see cars on blocks frequently.

interference fit threads are different than 'locking lugs', interference fit are the kind you might see anchoring utility poles to their moorings~ seldom used in automotive applications these are a one-time deal, and basically "weld" themselves in place. A "locking lug" is what? a 'french lock' that stops the nut from turning? [like you'll find on u-joints] or a couple of squirts of lock-tite, anyways something that can be dis- assembled with a modicum of force instead of breakin' out the torch to make 'em cherry red, then with hammer torture them loose~

27,905

Read above post for answer to your question judge

26,145

I never was a fan of locking lug nuts as a theft deterrent...IMO they're a serious pain in the @ss, when it comes to changing a flat or getting tires rotated...God Forbid you LOSE that damn special wrench..then you're screwed. I can see where they make sense on a Lambo or a Ferrari or similar upscale car with pricey tires/rims and TPMS sensors to match.. Guessing that locking lugs are a hit with the thugs in the hood with Chrysler 300's with 24 inch dubs, though...LOL!

1 of 1 people found this helpful.
27,905

Oh yeah I tell ya I hate it people come in all the time wanting their tires rotated and you can never find the socket and you ask them and most act like theu have no clue what it is durrrr

10

Alright, I work at a car shop but started without knowing very much. A customer came in wanting new tires, but didn't have his wheel lock. I ordered him a new locking set, and knew we'd have to break off his current locking set. However, we ended up breaking ALL of them off, and I never ordered regular lug nuts. I think the problem was we didn't have that certain socket. I was just confused because I thought those could be torqued off and reused but I guess not. Thanks yalls answers did help.

1 of 1 people found this helpful.

allyssarae728, must confess, am brand new to this, with my generation was the scourge of Left-Handed locknuts, which could easily tell with and L impressed on them, with this new generation would probably break out the acetylene torch, or knock 'em off as you did...and we are EXPECTED to know this?...special wrenches?....for lug nuts...someone ain't thinkin'...what if you were roadside with a flat on the freeway?...those designers, I tell ya~

A cartoon of the "NUT" in question would do so much more than your modern buggy there~

skeleton rims made from human bones~

1 of 1 people found this helpful.
99,235

I use locking lug nuts all year round. I have my good set on my summer wheels and a older set on my set of snow tires. I hand torque them down to 100#.

1 of 1 people found this helpful.

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