How many 4 cylinders were made?

25

Asked by Jan 04, 2008 at 08:29 PM about the 1962 Pontiac Le Mans

Question type: General

18 Answers

honestly,to many to count i belive the 4 cylender was standard for that car.

44,925

You have this question posted as being about a 1962 Le Mans. The 1962 Le Mans had only one engine, a 326-cid V8. The 4-cylinder was not available until the 1988-1993 Le Mans, which were based on a Daewoo platform. These had two options for engine: 1.6L 4-cylinder, or a 2.0L 4-cylinder. I couldn't find production numbers for this vehicle but they were all 4-cylinder from 1988-1993 when they were discontinued.

the lemans was built with a 4 cylinder 215ci in 1961-63,people should do their homework before openning their mouths. they are however very rare not many were produced somwhere around 3300. there were 2 4 cylinder engines that yr. the buick & pontiac. if its a pontiac engine it will have a code 162P. on the block.

3 of 3 people found this helpful.

the lemans had four different engines from 1961 - 1963 195ci, 215ci, 326ci, 389ci . if you still have doubts there is always Google.

2 of 2 people found this helpful.
55

There was never a production 389 in a 1961-63 Tempest or Le Mans, aside from the Trophy4 which was half of a 389. The 195ci was standard in these cars. The 215ci was the high compression Trophy4 with a 4bbl carb.There was also the option to have the 215 Aluminum block V8 Buick engine, but these are few and far between. The production drag cars had the Super Duty 421 engines with a transaxle that can best be described as two powerglides linked together with a unique stall converter.

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3,235

oops my bad ,no 389s in 61-63. i should have known this.

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105

1962 Pontiac Tempest Engine note midway - talks about the V8 (389) that became the 326 in 1963 - has allot of basic info in this artical below - I just found out allot when I purchased by 1962 Pontiac Tempest Lemans with a huge 4 cylinder ( Left bank of the 389 - (GM cost saving idea to used the same pistons bearuings and design size making the 4 a tough little motor. My car has a wierd option package it is a 4 cyl with a 4 barrel carb (yep! factory option) 4 speed manual 165 horse?! crazy - well read the artical below its good thanks 1962 Pontiac Tempest A minor exception to that was the compact 1962 Pontiac Tempest, significant for having GM’s first postwar 4 cylinder engine, a flexible driveshaft, and a rear transaxle (transmission in unit with the differential ) associated to independent link-type suspension. One enthusiast magazine called Tempest “a prototype of the Yank vehicle for the ’60s,” but no other U.S. make would have a rear transaxle and independent rear suspension till the Chevrolet Corvette and Plymouth Prowler of ’97. Like a speedometer cable, the 1962 Pontiac Tempest ‘s “rope” driveshaft carried rotary motion thru a long, delicately curved bar underneath the floor. Thin, but lightly stressed inside a steel case, it was mounted on bearings and permanently lubed. The driveshaft’s slight sag allowed a lower transmission tunnel in front, though not in back; it also eliminated the need for U-joints and authorized softer engine mounts for better interior isolation. The rear transaxle, a first for Detroit (but not the world ), made Tempest less nose-heavy than typical cousins Olds F-85 and Buick Special. But though its independent rear suspension was ostensibly superior, it was susceptible to unexpected oversteer that might be alarming, especially on wet roads. Still, the 1962 Pontiac Tempest handled well — more so than Chevy’s rear-engine Corvair, even though both used easy but difficult swing axles in back. The 1st 112-inch-wheelbase 1962 Pontiac Tempest used a unitized Y-body structure changed from the 1st Corvairs, as did the F-85 and Special. The standard slant-four teamed with manual and automated transaxles, and was offered in tunes to suit regular or premium gas. By 1963, horsepower Was 115-166 ( vs 110/130 in ’61). Optionally available for 1962 Pontiac Tempest was the Special’s 215-cid aluminum V-8 with 155/185 bhp. This gave way for ’63 to a debored 326-cid version of the Pontiac 389 packing 260 bhp. So supplied, a Tempest could scale 0-60 miles per hour in 9.5 seconds and reach 115 mph. 1962 Pontiac Tempest bowed with a single series listing standard- and Custom-trim four-door notchback sedans and four-door Safari lorries with one-piece rear “liftgate.” Coupes appeared at midseason with bench- or bucket-seat interiors, the latter christened LeMans. Custom and LeMans convertibles were added for 1962 Pontiac Tempest and proved quite popular, prompting a separate LeMans series for ’63. Styling did not change much. A twin-oval grille was used for ’61, a full-width three-section affair for 1962 Pontiac Tempest, a different split grille and squared-up body lines for ’63. Prices also failed to change much, with many models in the $2200-$2500 region.

4 of 4 people found this helpful.
105

retraction on the V8 as a 389 - the 215 was a buick engine? my bad - but the the 4 was the left bank as mentioned sorry for the mis info (gave me a chnce to post the interior pic - looks good for original

2 of 2 people found this helpful.
105

didnt see the ? it is a buick that was a typo

nice interior

4,805

Here's a good place to start researching: http://www.oldride.com/library/1962_pontiac_tempest.html The 389 V8 was indeed available in the 62 Tempest. ___________________________________________________ 41,535 Tempest fours were produced. 28,867 Tempest fours had synchromesh - 112,668 had Tempes-Torque. 1,658 Tempest V8s were produced. 86 Tempest V8s had synchromesh and 1,572 had Tempest-Torque automatic.

4,805

make that 141,539 Tempest Fours. Sorry!

105

you are the man thanks - has not happened yet but do you know anyone who can replace the rope drive bearings - heard they take a special tool and dont know if the parts are available and thanks on the interior comment it basically sold the car thanks to all

4,805

Its my understanding that any machine shop can do it. You'll want to get involved on the PY (Performance Years) forum to locate someone who can do this. Start here: http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=478237 and especially read the comments from "draggin GTO".

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30

How much would a Slant 4 cyl w/a 4bbl intake be worth?

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10

Here is mine 4cyl 4speed

1 of 1 people found this helpful.
10

Here is mine 4cyl 4speed

20

Okay guys, here's the real poop about the Tempest 4. 61 was an odd year for intake manifolds, the 4 bbl was dual plane. Max hp in 61 was 155. 62 they went to a single plane manifold on the 4 bbl, 166 hp. All 1 bbl manifolds were obviously single plane. 1 bbl engines ranged from 110 to 140 hp. There was also an over the counter engine available at 184 hp. Smokey Yunick set one of these up for the race track...all stock. That mill pulled 240 hp. I think that was for a pure oil race, or something like that. Nunzi Ramano is running a door slammer in NY, in the 11's. This has got to be the baddest 4 cylinder ever made. Also see 64 Lemans 4 cylinder turbo. I have been playing with this engine for over 20 yrs.

2 of 2 people found this helpful.

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