Over heating??

Asked by May 30, 2011 at 09:14 PM about the 1974 Volkswagen Beetle

Question type: Maintenance & Repair

Hello everyone,
I have a 74 beetle, and it seems to overheat. After driving around for 20-30 minutes the car spudders out. If is leave it for 20 minutes it will start up again and go for 20-30 minutes. Cap, rotor, plugs, wires, point and coil have all been replaced inthe last month or so.
Thank you for any help

5 Answers


go get you a meat thermometer. boil some water and stick it in to check the calibration. then drive the car, and when it spudders out go back, pull out the oil dipstick and insert the thermometer. if your oil temp is below 230 degrees, your really not overheating the oil. if temps are over 230 then you need to start by checking oil level, make sure ALL the tin around and under the engine is in place, and ALL the engine seals are good. report back on these things first.

2 of 2 people found this helpful.

Will do I also have an after market fuel pump installed on it is it possible that is is over heating?


is the fuel pump an electric pump? if so, it needs to be mounted up under the fuel tank. most of the time we mount them under the fuel tank on the passenger side. there is a nice flat panel there to mount them. the reason for this is that mechanical pumps are PULLER pumps. they PULL gas. electric pumps are PUSHER pumps. they PUSH gas alot better than they PULL gas. so if you have an electric pump in the engine compartment, you need to move it. they will heat up and can cause a lack of fuel.

1 of 1 people found this helpful.

well i encounter the same problem recently with my 73 beetle.. especially in a traffic jam.. I've been told its from the fuel pump so u have 2 find a way 2 keep the pump from overheating..

1 of 1 people found this helpful.

mechanical pumps are not affected by heat. electric ones can be. so are ya'll running electric or mechanical? MOST of these kinds of problems can be traced back to two things. either the fuel lines are running close to exhaust or the tank vent system is clogged. without writing a book here is the jest of both problems: if fuel line is close to a heat source (and it's gotta be hot like exhaust or heads) the fuel in the line turns from liquid to vapor. vapor can not be pumped so the car acts like it's out of gas. actually it really does run out because no gas is pumped into the carb. once the line cools down the gas returns to a liquid and pumps like normal. on the tank there is usually a vent line up by the top of the tank (just under the fill hole) if this line gets plugged up the tank will not vent. now when you suck gas out of the bottom of a container that can NOT get any air in it (vent is plugged) the tank gets pressure buildup. once this happens it becomes harder to suck gas out. think about pouring gas out of a gas can with the vent plugged up. it pours good for a second then starts gurguling, you open the vent and it pours smooth. or drinink out of a water bottle. turn it straight up and suck the water out. the bottom of the bottle starts to colapse because of the suction. next time you drive the car, remove the gas cap and see if this helps your problem. if so, then the vent system is plugged. if not i bet its vapor locking.

2 of 2 people found this helpful.

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