Engine temp gauge running hot

40

Asked by Feb 08, 2016 at 05:54 PM about the 2009 Toyota Camry

Question type: Maintenance & Repair

My check engine light came on the other day.
Before I could pull over the car stopped. Had it
towed. The next day It turned over. However, after
driving less than a mile the gauge started moving
up towards H. I've replaced the coolant temp
sensor and checked the thermostat. The car is NOT
leaking fluid. Both the ac and cooling fan work.
Please help.

11 Answers

I had the same issue on my 89' Camaro I found out it was a blown head gasket.

46,925

What you really need is a scan tool to read the check engine codes. Do you know anyone that has one? Will cut down on needless part replacing and guess work. How did you "check" your thermostat?

40

I put my thermostat in boiling water to make sure it was opened and closed. It did... I took the hose out of the over flow container and put it in water while the car was running to see if it boiled to determine if the gasket was blown. It did not.

40

I forgot to mention, When I took it to Auto Zone the code read that Coolant temp sensor needed to be replaced which is why I replaced it. After replacing it the light remained on and it continued to run hot. If the sensor or wire was bad would the fan still spin? The next day I turned the car on and the check engine light was not on. Yet the gauge moved towards H. That's when I checked the thermostat.

46,925

Just keep in mind that water boils at something like 212 degrees. Your thermostat is supposed to open at 180 degrees. If you just dropped it into boiling water, it may be opening at the higher temp and not the lower 180 temp. This would cause your car to get up into the higher heat range before the thermostat opens up. If you go through the trouble of taking out the thermostat, you should always just put in a new one. That way you can always be sure that it's not a thermostat issue. Have you felt the upper radiator hose when the engine is hot to make sure that the system is pressurizing? You may have a bad radiator cap. I would also remove the radiator cap and let the car run until it reaches operating temp, and see if the fluid is circulating. If everything seems to be operating fine, my next test would be to buy a head gasket test kit and see if your problem is with your head.

40

I believe we are getting somewhere. I took the cap off yesterday to check circulation at operating temp. It doesn't seem to be doing anything. This morning I squeezed the hoses at Operating temp with the cap off and they were pretty easy to close. Should this be? Are we getting somewhere?

40

I just put a thermometer in the radiator while the car was sitting idle and the temp is not moving... I drove around the block a few times and waited for the thermometer to go back to H. I think put the car in park and took the cap off and squeezed the upper radiator hose with no problem.

46,925

You will want to leave the cap on. Get the car to about mid level on the temp range, and then see if the hose is hard and pressurized. If it is soft, it means the cap is bad and losing pressure. If the cap is off, it will never pressurize.

40

I put coolant in and that seemed to have solved the problem.. It drove fine yesterday. It drove fine this morning Until I turned the heat on. Cold air blew out and it eventually overheated. Help?!

3 people found this helpful.
40

I can drive around for 20 minutes straight. When I turn off the car and touch the radiator cap it's yet cold. I can take it off feeling no heat where as before it would be to hot to touch.

1 people found this helpful.

Hey Amani, what was the end-result of your dilemma? How did you solve it?

Your Answer:

Camry

Looking for a Used Camry in your area?

CarGurus has 73,889 nationwide Camry listings starting at $1,250.

ZIP:

Toyota Camry Experts

  • #1
    Reelin68
    Reputation
    15,450
  • #2
    Tom Demyan
    Reputation
    5,120
  • #3
    last_chance_garage
    Reputation
    4,000
View All

Related Models For Sale

Used Honda Accord
582 Great Deals out of 104,443 listings starting at $1,225
Used Toyota Corolla
599 Great Deals out of 66,928 listings starting at $1,460
Used Honda Civic
407 Great Deals out of 49,585 listings starting at $1,495
Used Nissan Altima
737 Great Deals out of 66,540 listings starting at $1,000
Used Toyota Avalon
124 Great Deals out of 7,380 listings starting at $1,000
Used Toyota RAV4
544 Great Deals out of 79,733 listings starting at $1,995
Used Nissan Maxima
203 Great Deals out of 16,701 listings starting at $1,650
Used Hyundai Sonata
382 Great Deals out of 47,745 listings starting at $1,900
Used Toyota Highlander
393 Great Deals out of 51,863 listings starting at $2,500
Used Honda CR-V
611 Great Deals out of 78,550 listings starting at $1,995
Used Toyota Prius
154 Great Deals out of 18,103 listings starting at $1,000
Used Chevrolet Malibu
570 Great Deals out of 52,308 listings starting at $1,550
Used Ford Fusion
677 Great Deals out of 63,336 listings starting at $800
Used Toyota Tacoma
432 Great Deals out of 48,711 listings starting at $2,994
Used Toyota 4Runner
254 Great Deals out of 34,432 listings starting at $2,995

Used Cars For Sale

2018 Toyota Camry For Sale
36 Great Deals out of 39,794 listings starting at $16,999
2017 Toyota Camry For Sale
77 Great Deals out of 6,073 listings starting at $10,983
2016 Toyota Camry For Sale
83 Great Deals out of 4,538 listings starting at $9,900
2015 Toyota Camry For Sale
212 Great Deals out of 8,334 listings starting at $6,000
2014 Toyota Camry For Sale
74 Great Deals out of 2,725 listings starting at $6,995

Content submitted by Users is not endorsed by CarGurus, does not express the opinions of CarGurus, and should not be considered reviewed, screened, or approved by CarGurus. Please refer to CarGurus Terms of Use.