1969 Leyland Mini User Reviews

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User Reviews

Displaying all 4 1969 Leyland Mini reviews.

1969 Leyland MiniReview
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Its A Mini Thing — Minis are fun if you have not driven a old proper mini thats in good condision then you better do so befor you bag them out but if you have driven one a bit then you can bag them out lol its a MINI thing :)

Pros: good fun car to drive

Cons: can be a pain in the rain "LUCAS" lol

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1969 Leyland MiniReview
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Modified Mini — This was probably the car that had the best road holding capabilities of all the cars I have owned. It wasn't all that fast (stock) but once it was bored from a 1000cc to a 1175cc it was potent. Add to that a 38/42 Weber carburettor, banana branches and free flow exhaust system and you had a mean combination for such a small lightweight car. Bigger 6 cylinder cars didn't have a patch on it in a street race when cornering and short straights were involved.

Pros: Fun car if you have the cash to modify the engine.

Cons: Way too small for a big guy like me.

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1969 Leyland MiniReview
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Tough One, This One —

Few cars evoke such emotions in people as the iconic Mini. For many people, the love affair with the Mini is a strong one. Unfortunately, it often ends in tears. I’ve had around 6 of them, in various states of repair - my first at 14 years of age. For a novice looking to tinker with a car, not much beats a Mini – they’re pretty easy to work on and parts are easily available and relatively cheap. They were built reasonably well in the 60’s, with early (pre-1967) Australian cars being finished by dipping the whole body in paint. Despite the factory never making a cent on the sale of any Mini (they lost money on every one they sold) by the 1970’s build quality was atrocious. This was largely down to British Leyland cutting the cost of production and increasing profits – a disastrous strategy that cost Britain her entire auto manufacturing industry. The car I owned, a 1972 Leyland Mini, had been modified several times across her life. Not built very well to begin with, it had been de-seemed (a popular Mini modification – as they were built with unsightly external seems to make production in overseas markets easier) and was on its um-teenth engine. It was resplendent in its white at the front fading-to blue at the back paint work. I spent a great deal of time and money playing with/repairing that car – and it all ended in tears. When it was working, it was a joy to drive – the Mini’s addictive combination of chuckable handling, spritely performance, and diminutive size making beating bigger cars a joy. I also remember it costing me about $2.50 to head from Geelong to Melbourne and back (in the year 2000). When it wasn’t working, it was a pig of a thing. Quite often, the cause of poor running or not-running was (eventually) traced back to faulty brand-new replacement parts – how can you win?! The carbies go out of tune rapidly, the timing seems to alter itself at whim, the electrics are not only plagued by gremlins – but made by them, and the bodywork dissolves like Asprin. Just for a joke, the factory put the gearbox in the sump of the engine, making oil changes a regular necessity (every 3-5000kms), and replaced the normal steel-springs for the suspension with taught rubber doughnuts. A clever idea, until you try to travel any further than 3 kilometres, when it shakes your fillings out and makes it economically sensible to move in with your chiropractor. The Cooper and Cooper S models are highly sought-after and make a great weekend fun-car (if you can tame torque steer that will often have you changing lanes). My Mini died an undignified death, being written off by a P-plater who smashed into her on the same week I’d put it up for sale. The insurance cheque was more than I’d advertised it for, and paid for a new transmission (another one!) in my Audi…

Pros: Fun, great-handling, pokey performance, run on the smell of an oily rag.

Cons: Built by Communists (or monkeys; or communist-monkeys) and fall apart faster than a cheap suit.  The savings in fuel will be nothing compared to repair costs!

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1969 Leyland MiniReview
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Nothing But Baby Poo To Carpet Sticks Better Than A Mini To The Road! — My first car, and so glad I bought. You want to learn how to drive in the hills quickly with a FWD car, the mini is perfect! Not enough power to get you into serious trouble, but enough torque and lack of weight to enable you to go as fast as much more powerful cars, esp on the downhill :D

Pros: It was small and handled on rails, could park almost anywhere, girls thought it was cute, always gave you a smile driving it!

Cons: Parts were crazy expensive, seating position was 'interesting', girls thought it was cute, zero crash protection, lack of power in the dry and it only went to 140kph

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Displaying all 4 1969 Leyland Mini reviews.

Reviews From Other Years

1968 Leyland Mini Reviews

Leyland Mini Clubman By Robert

I bought the mini for AU$100 from a friend. It was my first car and the driver's side door had been wired shut as it had been in an accident. Originally the paint was probably gold, but it had faded ... Read More

1967 Leyland Mini Reviews

My Mini By Terry

because of the age all mini of that era are built by hand and generally rushed the workmanship on some of them is poor mine is no exseption as there is some problem with the pannling when putting 12" ... Read More

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