Who can help me with a "radical" no gasoline vehicle.

judge_roy
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Asked by judge_roy Feb 04, 2013 at 10:18 PM about the 2010 Bentley Brooklands Coupe

Question type: General

Since collectively Americans spend a lot of money on exercise, why not capture all that energy for use in your buggy, to get to the store?  My design exercises all four limbs, put just as much work as you'd like into an accumulator (like the kind you'll find on anti-lock brakes) for use propelling a vehicle, then use the rolling energy to charge the accumulator again? I simply need your rapid prototyping and 3D modeler. Most of the commercial components have been chosen.

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joef
3,235

The force/energy that it would take to recharge the accumulator would equal the force/energy that the accumulator would gives out. That would render it useless on flat ground and for going uphill so it would have to be constantly recharged while going uphill/in a straight line. If it were allowed to roll downhill for too long, it would eventually come to a stop unless some sort of clutch was installed.

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judge_roy
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the drive is hydrolocked, as the pump as motor will not let any fluid out. You're right in a closed loop system force in=force out that's why you can do twenty laps while stationary, then turn it loose--3000 psi can be made safe with dual containment to sheild a blowout. for chrissakes, your anti-lock braking system has one of these and you'd be surprised at how much energy it can store. More than deflating a football. My design calls for a ten litre bosch unit which can store quite a bit of energy.

judge_roy
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none of these things are established, just a wacky non conventional sort of design, for example no engineer will sign onto my program of bearing as motor, which in my humble opinion is self-evident. Apparently 3000 dynamic psi will blow out, to which I say look at the space shuttle. a 14" sealed bearing is not rocket science.

judge_roy
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Could you imagine storing all of the rolling energy from a san francisco downhill? The ten liter will probably get you to the zoo and back....actually regulations will not permit this, but an off road 'crawler' with nubby tires is not subject to highway rules.

judge_roy
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a keyed inner race and the outer race goes round and round. of course there will be hoses to the inner and outer races to a manifold/throttle poppet spool valve- x 4 for all wheels sakes thats a lot of high pressure expensive fluid rubber- not to mention out the accumulator and refill at the top...all high pressure rubber lines...drat-

judge_roy
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since you will be moving your hands and arms a total of eight inches stroke, a method of controlling the throttle simultaneously HAS to be a stationary (goes with) paddle throttle, that is used to tell the wheels to go, or pull back to capture the forces-(braking---to hydrolock--squeal the wheels) push to brake-

judge_roy
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Had a roll of autocad printouts but Inventhelp.com decided to keep them and inform me that I must build one, then they can put it before investors. I told them "I just want to build one", to which they offered no 3D solidworks rental, but tried to shake me down for 300 dollars instead. Invent Help MY ASS! since then the two computers crashed and burned taking my pirated autocad and ALL the drawings with. They are all still here in my noggen, just have to go metric now-

judge_roy
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Please let me use your copy of solidworks, I have only minimal exposure to this and looked pretty tricky, but I'm a quick learn with this. To rent a solidworks station is like three thousand a month, and you get to keep nothing, it's all property of solidworks ('least the software part)-

judge_roy
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Basic design. nothing fancy. like a mini breaks down into easily understood parts (if I could show you in 3D) do use the Bosch automotive design handbook, and all of the spatial guesses I've made were affirmed by this book.

judge_roy
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Steering might be a little hard to understand as you're pushing and pulling with your hands and kicking with both feet (not necessarily tied together, but a chain could make this happen) AND turning. I've chosen only 90 degrees to full lock and 90 the other way too, this way if you're pusing and pulling, it is still possible to do this and activate the paddle control in your left thumb.

judge_roy
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you could stop exercising with your hands and just work the feet for steering.

judge_roy
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joef, you seemed with me until the clutch part. what is needed is a throttle that can pull from the accumulator, then push into the accumulator. Simultaneously arms and legs will have a check ball so forces can only go in one direction kick-push the 8" stroke and pull the 8"---pushing does not generate forces as easily- Clutch=reverse flow pullin it slow. a clever throttle design will tackle this part.

judge_roy
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joef, can't seem your 'take this to a personal level, so I will spill it here'. Your notion of having too much pressure in your accumulator is dealt with the nitrogen half (the balloon displacement section and pressurization for the accumulator has a nitrogen bubble on top which can only take so much "before she blows". I'm concerned about getting to reverse gear. This thottle design with four in four out reverse flow to change four out pushin up against the four in--in a controlled, save metered fashion. A spool valve was my first thought because you can mount it anywhere with a cable control, but now am leaning to a rotary setup so flow can be metered more easily.

DavidH25
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The next step Bob is going to be hydrogen cells, when some engineer can come up with a storage system. Hydrogen is non finite, can be extracted from sea water, holds a tremendous amount of energy per weight unit..and I wish I were the engineer to come up with it...going to richer than Bill gates and The Sheik of Saudi Arabia combined. There is plenty of oil still in the ground but it is eventually going to be depleted when our great grandkids want to fill 'er up. There is no such thing as perpetual motion either

DavidH25
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Or jack up the rear end of your car, that way you are always going downhill

judge_roy
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David, nice fantasies-extracting hydrogen takes up more than a refrigerator's worth of equipment and not suitable for transportation at this point. I'm reminded of these "high-tech" pogo sticks that are just a damned three dollar bimbo cylinder with a tee stick and a crutch tip. bouncing on the pressure generated by the weight. This concept is kinda the same---you exercise, the hydraulic cylinders have a one-way checkball, the juice is pumped into a sealed tank (with the nitrogen bubble at the top)....you release the exercise energy into the wheels, which pump it back to the accumulator----sealed goodness...

DavidH25
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Bob, that is why I said 'when some engineer can come up with a storage system" and I did not mean putting sea water in and extracting it in the vehicle. Bob, Bob, have some coffee...when hydrogen can be stored in vitro...right in the womb of the car dude. you are smarter than that come on now....

DavidH25
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And then you are going back to perpetual motion, never been done my friend

judge_roy
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onboard algae bioreactor to produce hydrogen---now you're thinkin~

judge_roy
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the perpetual motion clock uses the earth's magneticism...so it's not really-

judge_roy
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Guruguys, it's a lot simpler than what you are invisoning. There is no hydrogen needed, because there is NO FUEL. Pressures are captured and stored. Big whoop. NOT ROCKET SCIENCE here....as I've stated, the tricky part is the motor/bearing which requires a dynamic seal (you know goes round and round, but still keeps the pressure contained)..."hermetically". Tie your heads around the concept that work in = work out. (with rolling and friction losses, and do not worry, it's a matter of clever throttle design at this point, quite sure one of you blokes can puzzle this one out for me)

judge_roy
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Wish I had a bently brooklands coupe. never seen one...ever.

judge_roy
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Neil Degrasse Tyson drives one of these-

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