CRV Timing Chain?

BoPo
25

Asked by BoPo May 26, 2008 at 03:49 PM about the 2005 Honda CR-V

Question type: Maintenance & Repair

Is there a problem with the Timing Chain/Belt on the Honda 2005 CRV?

44 Answers

littlehorn
30,105

Not that I have heard of.

19 out of 19 people think this is helpful.
Aaron Salsbury
1,175

i am in service at a Honda dealer and we dont have any problems with them at all.

23 out of 23 people think this is helpful.
Aaron Salsbury
1,175

and you have a chain not a belt

36 out of 36 people think this is helpful.
PEng
740

Yes, I think so. I have been told by Honda that I have to replace my timing chain, and the timing chain tensioner and timing chain cover, at only 102,000 km (60,000 miles) and a cost of $1,300 plus tax. Strange, since the car has had all its regular maintenance, by Honda, and I bought this vehicle on the understanding that the chain was designed to last the life of the engine. Does that mean that my engine is also shot? Or is it possibly a misdiagnosis of another problem? Or is it a Honda CRV timing chain and or tensioner problem?

74 out of 74 people think this is helpful.
You think this is helpful.
talainia
280

Yes I have a 2006 Honda CR-V and I recently went to the dealer and they said my timing chain has shifted and it is not covered under warranty.

15 out of 15 people think this is helpful.
talainia
280

I am at disbelief because I have a 2006 Honda CR-V and I just reached 100,00 miles and all of a sudden the timing chain has shifted. Now the Honda dealer is telling me that it is going to cost $1300 to fix and replace it. I was told that these vehicles were built to last and I wish I had read these online reports before I purchased my vehicle because others are having the same exact problem.

13 out of 13 people think this is helpful.
Adam Slaughter
615

i also work in honda service as a tech and can vouch for Aaron. Me and my co workers havent had any problems with the 2.4 timing chain engine that you have. Although we've had one that did need a chain and tensioner because it streched. Sometimes we might get a complaint of a noise due to the timing chain slapping on the guides but thats it. Your situation is kinda odd.

12 out of 12 people think this is helpful.
mom5x
200

I have a 2005 with 145,000 km and the chain has stretched. The Check Engine light comes on intermittently. Code is PO341. Problem is crank and cam positions don't match due to stretched chain. Vehicle has always been serviced at dealer using recommended fluids.

20 out of 20 people think this is helpful.
DougHatesCarFixing
350

We also got an intermittent check engine light and a dealer diagnosis of P0341, Cam & Crank in incorrect phase. This is on our '04 Honda CR-V, at 124,000 miles. This is especially surprising as that dealer had just replaced timing chain and tensioner 2 years ago, under an unspecified "service bulletin", as no-cost warranty repair (also they were unaware they had done this until I checked my invoice file and told them). As a former mech engineer, I cannot buy the "stretched chain" hypothesis. I believe a chain can only be stretched by huge torque, as on a racing motorcycle back wheel. Driving a camshaft should be a mild and steady load, I would think. I think it is far more likely to be a tensioner problem, and that should cost much less than the $650 or so they quoted for chain and tensioner. But the service guy sticks to 'the book' and the diagnostic code. He claims that the tech measured the deflection of the tensioner and chain, and found too much free play in the chain. The book says to replace both. He also said, correctly, that our car was low on oil. True, we have been losing oil over a couple of years and have not found the cause, but the car was occasionally 2 qts low (my fault). He claims that low oil can cause the tensioner to fail, which is believable since the tensioner depends on clean oil and oil pressure to function. I have to say that I am impressed that the car computer can measure and compare the crank and cam positions, and each has its own (angular) position sensor. I presume that a total failure of either sensor would put out a different code (as well as shut down the engine), and I doubt that either sensor could 'shift' out of calibration since they probably produce a pulse from a fixed mark on each shaft. Therefore I accept the finding that the two shafts are out of phase, whether constantly or intermittently. It is out of the question for the chain to have jumped a tooth on a sprocket- even if this were possible it would show up as bad performance right away. That leaves insufficient tensioning as the cause, so the chain goes a bit slack and the cam shaft 'lags' a bit. We don't hear 'chain slap' but it must be occurring, and it is bad. I will probably insist that they only replace the tensioner, against their advice, though I usually take their advice regardless of cost. I would like to hear a more detailed explanation of this code P0341 from one of the experienced techs.

35 out of 35 people think this is helpful.
saman2812
690

Hi , since you are a service person for Honda would you please let me know if 2006 Honda CRV fully loaded EX- LAWD special Edition has chain timing or belt ? Thanx

69 out of 69 people think this is helpful.
faaries
120

my honda crv 2005 stopped suddenly on motorway..without any warning..fortunately, I was on inside lane, and cruised on to lay by...timing chain had broken...affecting the fuel injectors..all of..which had to be replaced..and full engine dismantled....and cost over £1000, for parts alone, to replace..so much for honda reputation..will not consider in future ... posted 2012

12 out of 12 people think this is helpful.
sublimebln
120

The timing chain on my 2005 Honda CR-V has also broken. I have to replace the whole engine over $3,500 in damage. I won't be able to afford to fix it for a few weeks.

12 out of 12 people think this is helpful.
sztyler
150

My 2002 CR-V jumped timing due to a faulty tensioner. I was told by a honda tech that the tensioners go every 150,000kms. I don't believe there was any chain slap. There might be a bent valve, but one thing at a time. I will replace the tensioner, retime the engine, crank it over by hand and see if I have anything hitting. If not, then I will do a compression test. If no compression, then I will pull the head, replace the bent valves myself. If the valve guides are bent, then I will send the head into a machine shop to have them service it. I will then re-install the head (with a new head gasket) and new tensioner, time the engine and it should run like new. I won't replace the water pump as I've been told by various tech's that they'll run 250,000kms.

5 out of 5 people think this is helpful.
sztyler
150

So, if it ends up that there is more damage than I expected once I get the head off (i.e. damaged pistons), then I will simply buy a used engine from an auto-wrecker with low kms and install a new tensioner $100, water pump $100, plus cam and crank seals $30. Used engine with 150,000kms costs about $500-700. I found a shop that will install it for $600-700, plus $100 for fluids. This route will run me $1600 at most. The option above will run me about $200 doing the work myself...to be continued!

3 out of 3 people think this is helpful.
zerngl
80

I have had multiple problems with the timing chain on the 204 Honda Accord 2.4L 4 cylinder. Mine jumped time at just under 100k miles and was replaced by the dealer at no cost. My daughter has the exact car and hers went at 135,000 miles and the engine died while running. I was told that it probably bent the valves and would need a new engine. I replaced the chain, guides and tensor for $250 and installed myself. Car runs great now. Back to my car, at 155,000 miles the check engine light with the P0341 code came back on. The dealer said this is unusual and would only happen if I didn't change the oil often enough. I change three times a year and probably put 10K a year on the car (Im retired). There is a good article from Honda Tunning magazine (link http://www.hondatuningmagazine.com/tech/htup_1005_honda_k_series_tensioner/viewall.html) describing the chronic failing of the tensor in this Honda engine resulting in this failure. Very disappointed in Honda for not recalling the cars with this engine.

8 out of 8 people think this is helpful.
EC123
60

It's a known issue. I have a 2006 CRV EX and I had to replace the timing chain and tensioner. What happens is that oxidized oil builds up in a critical oil orifice in the tensioner and begins to close it off. The chain is lubricated by pressurized oil coming from this orifice. After a time, the chain starts to wear out, stretches, and you get the timing mismatch code or worse - catastrophic failures. I could have avoided this if I had USED GOOD SYNTH OIL AND CHANGED IT EVERY 5,000 miles. Also, these engines tend to burn oil, so make sure you keep the level up. At oil change time, I usually have already topped it off several times adding up to about 3 quarts! Now I've got the torque converter shudder...LOL!

6 out of 6 people think this is helpful.
ashleyf33
70

I have a Honda CRV 2002 with an engine that needs replacing (due to streached cam belt, and bent valves etc) Does any one know of any problems of putting a 2006 engine in? Apparently they are the same.

2 out of 2 people think this is helpful.
sztyler
150

The 2006 engine is identical to the 2002 engine. The only thing that is different is the "intake manifold", but the "exhaust manifold" is the same. Just keep the old engine for the "intake". FYI: The wiring harnesses from an automatic CRV to a standard transmission CRV in this era are different just so you are aware. If you are buying an engine with atleast 100,000 miles/kms on it, I highly recommend you change out the "timing chain tensioner" and the "thermostat". The tensioners are known to fail at about 135,000miles/kms. I would also make sure to use a quality oil (it doesn't have to be synethic) in your new engine and monitor oil levels--always keep it full and change every 4000-5000miles. If oil levels ever go below 1-litre, the tensioners have been known to fail; this is what happened to us. All Honda engines are known to use a little oil between fill-ups. If you're getting the engine from an auto-wrecker and you don't know the history of it, I would change the oil after the first 2000-3000miles just to flush it out and keep the engine clean, then resume to 4000-5000miles/kms oil changes. If the valves seem a little chatty I would also add in 1-cup of transmission oil into the motor oil to clean the engine/valves; this is a common trick of mechanics.

6 out of 6 people think this is helpful.
ashleyf33
70

Thank you, have purchased the 2006 engine, now to freight it 2000KM!

1 out of 1 people think this is helpful.
ashleyf33
70

2006 engine is installed, plus gear box. but gears wont go into reverse or shift up... any ideas?

1 out of 1 people think this is helpful.
tellis1995
60

I have a 2006 Honda CR-V at ONLY 76,000 MILES I have to replace a timing chain. Are you kidding me?? 76,000 MILES. I have had regular oil changes. I have done nothing wrong. These "dependable" car has been a pain in my ass. Done with Honda. I cannot believe I have not even eclipsed 100,000 miles and my timing is bad. Poor manufacturing.

6 out of 6 people think this is helpful.
You think this is helpful.
ashleyf33
70

If its just the chain, we got one off ebay brand new original Honda for AU$100 or less. Initially we thought that would fix the problem with my Honda, but alas it had done great damage already. I hope yours gets fixed with less hassle than mine!!

1 out of 1 people think this is helpful.
halvez
10

honda engines are great if you take care of them I have 391k miles on my 2000 honday accord v6 and I am going for my 4th timing belt replacement when it hit 400k all you have to do is replace the oil every 3 to 5k miles depending on your driving habits if you drive it in traffic like I do then you replace it after 3k and always use a good oil i use mobile one oils they are the best

1 out of 1 people think this is helpful.
MarfaLuna
0

I just picked up my 2005 CRV from the engine rebuilder. At 181,000 the timing chain had stretched enough to jump and it ate 3 intake valves. rebuild including r&r was about $2,300. This may be my last Honda. When I bought it new I thought it was great that it had a timing chain, not a belt.

Eddie Luby
60

honda 2005 runs forever,dont know what everyone is on about?

6 out of 6 people think this is helpful.
natle
100

have just bought a 2005 gee hope the timing chain is ok how do you check it please

10 out of 10 people think this is helpful.
Pajo
10

I am in 'squeaky bum' mode at the moment as I have to have a cam chain and tensioner fitted to my 2005 crv diesel. My local honda garage wanted £1680 inc vat, but managed to get 'mates rates' at my local garage using genuine Honda parts which are astronomically priced. The car has done 140k miles and is rattling like a pot full of marbles. Despite protests from both Honda and my local garage not to use the car at all until the chain is replaced, I do not have any other choice than to use it, albeit very gingerly, until I go on a well deserved holiday and the car goes in for an equally deserved cam chain set in two weeks time. Lets hope the car makes it without the dreaded 'snap'!!!

Alan Tweedlie
40

Chains don't stretch, they wear. Belts can stretch but the links of the chains wear.

3 out of 3 people think this is helpful.
FordNut
38,495

Chains do stretch, I have had it proven to me. The holes in the links for the pins wear and get bigger and that's all it takes. Even though the links themselves, hardened steel will stretch a miniscule amount. My Ford 390 has a pushrod engine and two chains, a double roller chain and the plastic/nylon gears.— made of that material for quiet broke a cog. So I decided to put new chains on at the time and the new ones were fully ¼ shorter than the old ones.

2 out of 2 people think this is helpful.
Alan Tweedlie
40

FordNut, the length of chains increase with wear because, as you say, the holes in the links wear and become larger. That's not stretching as the individual components of the chain don't increase in length, it's just wear. That's what I ment when I said chains don't stretch.

1 out of 1 people think this is helpful.
Pajo
10

Thank you Fordnut, I did manage to last another two weeks before I had the complete chain set fitted by my usual garage. And boy, had it worn and stretched!! So much so that the chain tensioner could not open any further! I can't believe the difference.... my old tub sounds like brand new, and although it cost me £1200 (using genuine Honda parts), it was a far better deal than Honda's £1800 quote. People thought I was nuts spending that amount on a car with 140k on the clock, but I couldn't have bought another Honda for that amount of money, and the old girl does everything I ask of her; whether its delivering goods, stacking drums and amps for gigs, loading 2 bikes for days out, filling it up with wood for my log burner, as well as pulling a trailer tent up and down the country, not to mention driving around Europe with a huge box on the roof.... one does get attached, and I think it was worth every penny. There is a story on the grapevine that when Honda brought out the CRV diesel Mark 2, they put the contract out for the manufacture of the cam chains to a third party, and it wasn't long before Honda realized that some of them were not up to scratch and punters were complaining. Honda had a recall put in place for cars up to seven years old to have the cam chain replaced. Even though my Honda was second-hand and was within that timeframe I never received any info from Honda about it. Thay obviously knew where I lived because I have had two or three recalls for minor things since then. Not sure how true the story is, and if it is, perhaps they were very coy as to who they were going to recall as they didnt really want to splash out! Anyway, all is well, and I am very happy tootling around the country at 40+ mpg and I foresee our relationship reaching 200k with the utmost ease..... after have had the clutch changed that is!!!!!! Any one thinking about buying a second-hand CRV should have no worries as they are built like a tank, but if the engine sounds like its slap- happy it may pay to look at another one. Cheers everyone!

1 out of 1 people think this is helpful.
FordNut
38,495

Fair enough Alan. Makes sense.

FordNut
38,495

Pajo, when you use the £ sign leads me believe your in Great Britain, I know of no other Country that uses that, (Please correct me it I am wrong) and your Honda is the second-best car in it's class and will take you far beyond 200k with proper care. Please forgive my 'second-best' remark. I am just biased, a Toyota guy. My son has an Accord with 195,000 on it and is having trouble with the power windows, but that's as serious as it gets on his car. And a diesel will do even better (usually). Good day to you guys

1 out of 1 people think this is helpful.
ghengus23
10

We have a 2002 and replaced the timing chain as Honda suggested (a cool $1300). We had never had to replace oil between oil changes every 3,000 - 5,000 miles. Now, suddenly after our timing belt change, we're losing oil like crazy; 1.25 quarts every 400 miles or so and Honda can't tell us the reason. We've been back three times to their repair shop and they don't know the reason. No oil under the engine, no burnt oil particles in the tailpipe. No one know what the fnck is going on. As a preferred Honda driver for years I am terribly unhappy and unimpressed by this whole ordeal. The Honda CRV timing chain and tension system if horribly flawed and should be recalled by Honda. I would not recommend a Honda CRV to anyone.

sztyler
150

The shop who replaced the chain obviously missed something! I suggest you NEVER allow your oil level to go any lower than half a litre. The tensioner system in Honda CRV's require strong oil pressure which is determined by the oil level. Failing to keep the oil level at the top will/can cause the tensioner to fail, then the chain to skip a tooth, then your engine will go out of timing and this will cause a bent valve. I am speaking from experience. As for the oil usage, it could be that replacing the PCV valve or spark plugs will clean it up. That said, I have seen various honda and other car companies engines using a litre of oil every 1000kms/miles - even new cars. What a person pays for in oil in their Honda, they may save in repairs in another car that breaks down more frequently. All I can say is always stay on top of regular oil changes in the CRV's, use a good quality oil, never allow the oil level to drop, change the tensioner every 100,000 to 125,000kms/miles as well as their know to fail. The first two years of the CRV's had more issues with the chain and tensioner, but improvements were made in 2004. Recommend getting a 2004 or newer CRV, or immediately change the oil and tensioner if you buy a 2002 or 2003 model.

1 out of 1 people think this is helpful.
ghengus23
10

Why wouldn't Honda recall these regularly faulty tensioners? Why doesn't Honda know the answer to my oil burning CRV? DO they not want to admit their fault in overcompensating with a timing chain + tensioner replacement when a simple solution to my earlier problem could have sufficed? I am not sure where to go from here and neither is the Honda service center from whence I am returning every few weeks. What might you suggest? http://honda-tech.com/honda-accord-crosstour-2003-current- 118/problem-solution-oil-consumption-problems-2003-2007-honda- accords-2963428/

ghengus23
10

The contact information for both Japan Honda and American Honda Addresses to submit your complaints to Honda Motor Company Ltd. 8-1 Hon-Cho, Wako-City, Saitama 351-0188 JAPAN (048) 452-1000 Mr. Cheiko Sakamoto Parts, Sales and Service Divison American Honda Motor Co., Inc. Honda Automobile Customer Service Torrance, CA 90501-2746 Mail Stop: 500 - 2N - 7D President: **** Colliver 1-800-999-1009

1 out of 1 people think this is helpful.
Markw1952
1,345

Psst, I've got a secret for you. ....when it's time to replace your timing chain, it's time for a new car! Now you'll find out why it was better to have the timing belt, which is much easier to replace. And because there's a regular interval for changing the timing belt, you'll know that there's no chance that you'll blow up your engine. I was very surprised to see how many people had timing belt failures with the Honda CRV. Unpleasant surprise and poor design, shame on Honda.

Charles Gow
0

My Sister has a 2006 crv top of the line with 130000 ... timing belt went and say the repairs are more than the value of the car. they are willing to give her $1500 to buy it from her... is this a good deal?

sztyler
150

I wouldn't say this is a good deal at all, unless her CRV is rusted, banged up, needs $5000 in body work, needs tires, brakes, the interior is haggled. If her car is a nice clean CRV then it will be 100% to your advantage to keep it and repair it how I suggest and here's why... The market value of this a 2006 CRV on craigslist is still $8500-$10,000. In 2002 Honda changed the motors in their CRV and now they all come with a timing chain and not a belt. If the shop you're dealing with said you have a belt failure, then pay the $50 tow fee and get a second opinion, cause it definitely has a chain and not a belt. The chain is suppose to be good for the life of the car. If the chain failed it was likely due to a fail in the tensioner which then created slack in the chain, which then put the CRV out of timing and then a piston hit a valve or two--thus causing your issue. This from what you've read above is one of Honda's problems with this new era of CRV's and should have been a recall, but they never did. So yes, rebuilding this motor is alot of time and effort if you don't know what you are doing or if you are relying on a shop to do it. A shop could charge you $3000-4000 to rebuild this motor as it's alot of work. BUT, what I would recommend and this is exactly what I did is, call an auto- wrecker and buy a good used low mileage motor from a 2004-2006 CRV and have it installed. The auto wrecker will tell you how many miles are on the motor you are buying and they are accurate. A motor will run you about $500-$700 and the installation will run you about $550-650. You will need to shop around for a wrecker who will sell at this price and a garage that will install for this price--make 5-7 calls to each place and you'll find what you need. Call auto-wreckers and garages on the other side of city as well, as prices will vary from one end of the city to the next by more than 50%!!! A big shop will want more for the install, while a smaller shop or a home based mechanic will do it for these prices I'm mentioning. When dealing with auto wreckers, you have to always use my favorite line "can you do any better on the price than that" as they'll always quote you higher initially? They'll almost always drop the price by 20-30%, if not just ask them if they'll let the motor go for $600 or whatever price you want to pay. An auto wrecker will also give you a 3-6 month warranty on the motor and the motor they are installing into your CRV is one that came out of a CRV that was hit in an accident but the engine was unharmed--so a perfect running engine with warranty. This is all a shop is going to do if you sell them your sisters CRV. The one thing I recommend you do with that new engine is buy a new tensioner from Honda $125 and have it installed into that engine before they install the engine into your CRV. It's easier to install the tensioner while the new motor is out of the CRV. The tensioner as I mentioned earlier are known to as earlier as 130,000miles. That said, I've seen some CRV's with 300,000kms and on the original tensioner. The tensioner is one of those things that should be replaced in these CRV's every 100,000kms/miles although Honda does not recommend it and few mechanics know this, but doing so prevents issues like the one your sister is experiencing. I know this information first hand in speaking with several Honda Technicians who now recommend this after seeing people with issues like your sisters. And I am speaking from first hand experience as I also had the same problem as your sister and resolved it the exact same was as I mentioned above with a good used engine and new tensioner and my CRV is running strong for two years now with no issues. So when the dust settles, you will have paid about $1500 at the very most and your sister's CRV will be up and running and will be every bit as reliable as before if not more reliable with the new tensioner. The new tensioner is a must. Also make sure to check the motor oil every 4- 5th fill up. It is normal for many engines out there to use a little oil between oil changes. If the oil level starts to drop below the "LINE", just top it up to the line--but never over. The tensioners in the CRV's run on oil pressure which is why the oil level needs to be perfect. If the oil level drops to a half to one litre/quart below the mark for a few weeks, don't panic, just top it up. I recommend keeping the oil level perfect and changing it every 4000-5000 for preventative maintenance and to avoid any future issues. And make sure to use a quality oil like Quaker state. Never use a cheap or recycled oil as this is what can cause tensioners to fail. Even if you repaired your sisters CRV at $1500 and sold it for $9000, you'll still be ahead of the game and this is what I would personally recommend. But if you're going to add a new motor from an auto wrecker and a new tensioner, then I would definitely keep the car as it will be as reliable as ever. Good luck!

Pajo
10

Hi Charles, I think sztyler has answered you comprehensively, and I agree with him entirely. Of course, if you fancy a change of car all you have to do is take their miserly offer, add loads of cash to the offer and then find another car. Danger is you could end up with a right 'lemon' and then you'll be right back where you started! Basically, I decided to change the cam chain because I love my Honda; it does everything I ask of it, throw wood and logs for our wood burner, my drum set and the PA system, bicycles, all my tools, and despite touring around UK and Europe have never run out of luggage space, (but to be sure we added a roof box!) and with having a tow bar fitted I have a trailer for bigger jobs, and have a trailer tent for long weekends away. Even though it had completed 140000+ miles, I decided to change the timing chain and tensioner because I would rather have 'the devil I know'..... if there any minor problems with it, at least I know and can choose to rectify them at my leisure. Lets face it, nothing lasts for ever, and reaching 140000+ miles without any major problems is no mean feat! Believe it or not, I am still using the original clutch! And when I did decide to get the cam chain changed, fearing that I was going to lunch the engine at any moment, it was still returning 42mpg on a good run. Remarkable! Now it runs as quiet as a mouse. Another thing is: if you accept that miserly offer, the garage will then proceed to repair the car and sell it on at a sizeable profit. So you might as well get it repaired instead. It's your call really.... how much do you really love your CRV?

ghengus23
10

As I've had the timing belt changed in my Honda along with the Solenoid Valve and the VTC Oil Control Valve, my 2002 is still running like crap; there is a sluggish response to stepping on the gas pedal (misfiring?). I've brought it back to the Honda dealer three times (who originally put in the new timing chain) and they cannot provide me with an answer as to why my car is not running correctly; it eats oil (about 1.5 quart every 500 miles and gas mileage per gallon has dropped). The Honda shop has given us a loner car each time, but they say they cannot locate a problem. When I step on the gas slightly going uphill, the engine slips into low gear revs up, misfires and the engine light flashes on and off, then stops once I let off the gas. Any suggestions???

ghengus23
10

EDIT: the flashing light stops when I let off the gas while going uphill and the car continues to drive normally. Basically, it the engine goes above a certain RPM (especially when going up a hill, putting extra stress on the motor), the engine light flashes on and off, the car missfires and loses power.

sztyler
150

If you have a flashing check engine light this is a good thing to help you diagnose the issue. I would suggest hooking up a good OBD Computer (professional grade $15,000-$20,000 unit) to your car and go for a drive up some hills so it can read the codes from the flashing light. This will tell them alot about what is going on. This will also tell you whether it is an ignition or fuel problem. Failing this, I can suggest a variety of things to try one by one to rule out the issue. Give this list to your Honda Dealer to check and make sure they don't charge you since this has been an ongoing issue for you. First...check the battery output, alternator charging and wiring to both these items. Check to see if you have a clogged fuel filter or even add some sea-foam to your gas to clean your injection system. See if you have a clogged EGR or PCV? Test the resistance in a few key sensors and items on your engine: camshaft positioning sensor and all 4 coil packs, etc. Then either look up online what the normal resistance is or go to a parts supplier with your Multi- Meter and test the resistance in the new sensors, coil packs, etc.. Check your spark plugs to see what color they are or if you have a dead plug. I've had a new plug go dead after one month which caused the car to run poorly then the engine light went on and off. I replaced the dead plug and voila--all good. Try swapping in a new computer into your CRV - they take no time to swap in. An auto wrecker may allow you to borrow one. When honda replaced your timing chain, if they didn't disconnect your positive battery terminal when doing the repair, they may have somehow shorted something out in the wiring/ignition system of your CRV. Only a good wiring expert would be able to locate and diagnose such an issue, if this in fact is the issue?? Call a Honda Dealer in another city, state or country to see what they have to say? You also mentioned the engine misfires? Does the engine Ping when it misfires? If so, this could be due to a clogged oil pick-up in the oil pan and is quickly resolved by removing the oil pan and cleaning out the oil pick-up with air or water, drying it off and re-installing it. Try one item at a time to see what the issue could be. Start by having Honda hook up their OBD computer to your CRV and taking it up a hill to get the codes to flash then go from there. Do keep us posted.

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Related Models For Sale

Used Toyota RAV4"
760 Great Deals out of 29,913 listings starting at $1,000
Used Honda Accord"
1,185 Great Deals out of 61,913 listings starting at $900
Used Honda Civic"
1,013 Great Deals out of 63,942 listings starting at $1,400
Used Honda Pilot"
618 Great Deals out of 16,778 listings starting at $3,500
Used Ford Escape"
912 Great Deals out of 57,925 listings starting at $900
Used Subaru Forester"
264 Great Deals out of 26,079 listings starting at $1,075
Used Toyota Highlander"
500 Great Deals out of 15,636 listings starting at $3,995
Used Toyota Camry"
1,601 Great Deals out of 80,197 listings starting at $1,295
Used Hyundai Santa Fe"
336 Great Deals out of 22,646 listings starting at $2,430
Used Nissan Murano"
355 Great Deals out of 16,818 listings starting at $2,495
Used Subaru Outback"
364 Great Deals out of 13,870 listings starting at $1,700
Used Toyota Corolla"
1,304 Great Deals out of 52,718 listings starting at $1,988
Used Toyota 4Runner"
323 Great Deals out of 9,843 listings starting at $1,595

Used Cars For Sale

1998 Honda CR-V For Sale
3 Great Deals out of 88 listings starting at $2,500
1999 Honda CR-V For Sale
88 listings starting at $2,500
2000 Honda CR-V For Sale
9 Great Deals out of 112 listings starting at $2,800